Articles in the Everything Category
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Horror Story

By Rachel Rostad | May 24, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘In my favorite fiction about us, I would see you and some bell within me would toll—the way an elephant will walk over the bones of its own kind, know it instantly, and fall down and mourn. Instead, I looked away. What struck me was not like lightning or love, and so I wept.’

What Makes Pussy So Problematic?

By Rokudenashiko | May 18, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The story behind Japanese artist Rokudenashiko’s arrest for her vagina-inspired sculptures

Lavender Town: Three Poems by Sally Wen Mao

By Sally Wen Mao | May 17, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘When you climb the stairway, / don’t shield your eyes / from the pixels, 30 hertz heat— / don’t shield your awe / from the ghosts of pretty prey’

Kate Gavino’s ABCs of Being an Asian American Writer

By Kate Gavino | May 13, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

From Ann M. Martin’s Claudia Kishi to intersectionality, SPAM, and The Woman Warrior

The Next Bruce Lee and Other Poems by Kien Lam

By Kien Lam | May 10, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘I’ve heard the way some people breathe / at night and it made me want / to close their mouths. I think / inside of all of us lies / an animal trying its best to escape.’

Blank, White Spaces: An Interview with Esmé Weijun Wang

By Larissa Pham | May 9, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Writer and mental health advocate Esmé Weijun Wang talks about languages, love, immigrant children, and her debut novel, The Border of Paradise

Islamophobia in the Bible Belt

By Deepa Iyer | May 4, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

As immigrant communities reshape Tennessee’s racial landscape, how the state has become a breeding ground for anti-Muslim sentiment

Lives You Never Had: Two Poems by Tyler Tsay

By Tyler Tsay | May 3, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘the games you played as a child: / cracks breaking bones with every step. alive because / that’s your job.’

Benedict Anderson in Search of Tjamboek Berdoeri

By Benedict Anderson | April 29, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Solving the mystery behind a Chinese Indonesian writer’s forgotten account of the final years of Dutch colonial rule through Indonesia’s armed revolution

dear Bambi: Three Poems by Kristin Chang

By Kristin Chang | April 26, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘So be / domestic, Bambi / no one kills a pet / So sell your flesh / for fabric, Bambi. Leash / your skin to a lawn / meat yourself.’

Two Mothers: A Comic Based on Interviews with the Mothers of Akai Gurley and Peter Liang

By Asians4Peace | April 20, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘How should I feel after bringing someone into the world to them have them unjustly taken from me?’

A House Made of Flames: Two Poems by Albert Abonado

By Albert Abonado | April 19, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

When we point towards the horizon and say this is the color / of our grandfather, we do not know for how long // the night will carry your shade or what winds / brought you here.

Kareem: An Excerpt from Technologies of the Self

By Haris A. Durrani | April 15, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘He lingered on the edges of my social field of view, here in the basement lab where it was hot and loud’

Hasanthika Sirisena’s Country Surrealism

By Leland Cheuk | April 13, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The author talks about her award-winning collection of short stories, which takes us on a contemporary Sri Lankan’s global journey

The Clouds Followed Us: Two Poems by Hala Alyan

By Hala Alyan | April 12, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘We begged our bodies for / alchemy, death into new lungs, we fed bread / to the jinn’

Only the Clotheslines Knew: Poems by Zeina Hashem Beck

By Zeina Hashem Beck | April 12, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘You’ve memorized its bends like a prayer, / its long silver-gray hair, / its cigarettes, its favorite / songs and curse words, / the holes in its shirts.’

We’re in the Room, Calvin Trillin

By AAWW | April 11, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Writers respond to Trillin’s doggerel “Have They Run Out of Provinces Yet?”

Ochazuke

By Mike Fu | April 8, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘He doubts he has the capacity to uproot himself and start over in a foreign land at this age. But times of war and revolution have a tendency to embolden the meek, to electrify the confident.’

The End of History

By Kristine Sloan | April 5, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘The right to hxstory is the right to know. / I need to know how my mind is theft. / My body is property because my mind is theft. / I say “woman” and I can still move my mouth.’

Hour of the Ox: Poems by Marci Calabretta Cancio-Bello

By Marci Calabretta Cancio-Bello | March 29, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

We graze our fingers through damselfish schools, // but our appetites are as insatiate as the sea is for land. / We gnaw the shore, legs wound in seaweed, / skin flayed by the tongues of clams, pulling, pushing.

Meet AAWW’s 2016 Open City and Margins Fellows

By AAWW | March 25, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Follow the work of these ten writers in our online magazines.

AAWW TV: Remixing Guantanamo Bay

By AAWW | March 23, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Poet Philip Metres talks about why he chose to create an opera from a redacted history of torture

Chinese Dreams: Two Poems by Timothy Yu

By Timothy Yu | March 22, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘At Downtown Crossing // he trail the shoppers, buying nothing, & rub / his rented nose. He know: myself am hell. / His feet unmoved in the snow.’

A Penny Short

By Peter HZ Hsu | March 18, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘I left them both at the wedding reception. The best man was toasting the groom by listing all the women he’d given up for his new bride, and I’d had about enough.’

Matt Huynh Inks Stories of an Inherited War

By Michelle Chen | March 11, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The artist’s interactive graphic novel adaptation of Nam Le’s “The Boat” is an entry point to a conversation about refugees today

Edge of a Time Zone: Two Poems by Ae Hee Lee

By Ae Hee Lee | March 8, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

You said you were an ant, eyes frozen / on an indigo wave looming over the world. / (You reset every time / you move forward.)

Ghost Forest

By Pik-Shuen Fung | March 4, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘Say, I’m here, Dad, my mom said. I’m here, Dad, I said. You have to say it louder so he can hear you.’

High-Wire Acts: An Interview with Alexander Chee

By Catherine Chung | March 2, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The author of the The Queen of the Night talks about being possessed by a woman who never lived and how writing fiction is all about bringing to life the thing you see that nobody else can

March First Movement: Korean Translations

By Kim Kirim, Im Hwa, and Kim So-wŏl | March 1, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘All the bitter things, one by one, in a rush, / She wants to swallow. Clothed in blueblack scales in a forest of iodine-colored seaweeds, / She wants to be chased by a shark.’

Ashok and Hua Freestyle in a Freezing Greenpoint Park

By Ashok Kondabolu | February 25, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Journalist and music critic Hua Hsu talks to Ashok Kondabolu about the best and worst of his dad’s record collection and how his fascination with rap beef inspired his upcoming book

To an Unknown Passenger

By Phinder Dulai | February 23, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘my hulled hands crash against the tide / to the unloved I will offer / a part of me / in hope my wards will be made complete / for another life’

My Family Was Under Threat

By Meiko Ko | February 19, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘I’m conducting an experiment for escape.’

The Fates: Two Poems by Eddie Kim

By Eddie Kim | February 16, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘There’s a piece of me / that has never been / to this country and another that never left. // I stare at strangers as if they might be friends. // It took three weeks of traveling / before anywhere looked like home.’

Death is a Festival

By Anis Shivani | February 9, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘He knew the genealogies and coats of arms of / all his neighbors, with pride at its right hand and / cruelty at its left’

Foraging

By Aditya Desai | February 5, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

He’d gotten used to the routine of filling out the job applications: name, address, past positions, done. But then came that deadly box, ‘Have you ever been convicted of a crime or felony?’

Bite Hard: Three Poems by Justin Chin (1969-2015)

By Justin Chin | February 2, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘when I am dark/ when I am no more light/ when I am no / more an abomination/ when I am no more shame/ when I am face / again/ when the collective being of me worships god, family, / education and the collective administrative silver spoon, / then I will be back in the fold.’

History Through Invention: Iksaka Banu’s “Farewell to Hindia”

By Iksaka Banu | January 29, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘When the Japanese were in power, I realized that the Dutch East Indies with all of its aristocratic ways, was finished. I must have the guts to say goodbye to it. And whatever fate befalls me, I will remain here.’

Another Kind of Death

By Lillian Kalish | January 28, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

It was just the right and wrong moment to leave, to go to China, to live in a country where the weight of blackness might not hinder your breathing. And yet, there were things you were afraid of losing.

What I Saw Through The Telescope

By Jess X. Chen | January 26, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘We are given a face, / which means we are given / a vessel of blood to call body, / & lungs–that know the alchemy / of altering wind into breath–the way / plants are always transforming / someone’s last words / into oxygen.’

Now Alive, Now Burning: Three Poems by Yuki Tanaka

By Yuki Tanaka | January 19, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘We melted in amnesia, bubbled up / from the ocean, rinsed clean / of appetite, all healed, / all negated, a sequence of two spines / imitating an arrow. A jaguar loved us. / He licked where our hips had been, / and we cucooked in reply.’

Digging a Hole to China

By Michelle Chen | January 15, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

In Huan Hsu’s The Porcelain Thief, the search for a family treasure unearths the spell of nostalgia

Letters for __________you.

By Esther Lee | January 12, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘You brace yourself against the oncoming. But today the sea glistens like the fish you used to scale.’

Line Break Courage and Other Poems by Zhou Sivan

By Zhou Sivan | January 5, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘we need to reinvent the image of tragedy for the nation everyday / or even in the everyday / get incensed or pretend to be so or else there is no exit and no future’

Chopped: Four Sections

By Wo Chan | December 29, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘All your potatoes on the ground—you were never meant for this. The camerawoman tiptoes around spilled tubers as she zooms in on your front teeth, tearing open a parcel of dried shrimp. ‘

Five Boroughs, Seven Killings

By Rishi Nath | December 28, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

New York City through Marlon James’ Booker Prize-winning novel

The Starfruit Tree

By Ashwak Fardoush | December 25, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘Because she had saved my sister once, when my mother tried to pound out the wildness from my sister’s body with both words and sticks, no one ever came to rescue her.’

Flowers of Yarn

By Rowan Hisayo Buchanan | December 16, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

A graphic memoir on ritual and mourning

No Need for the Moon to Shine in It

By Jane Wong | December 15, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘Murder is to mitosis is to mercy. / We are mostly legs too: part tendon, part pardon, kicking / or curling.’

I am a Slave to Narrative

By Melani Budianta and Yvonne Michalik | December 10, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The Indonesian fiction writer Intan Paramaditha on the political potential of horror and writing as a feminist practice

Bad Women: Intan Paramaditha’s “Apple and Knife”

By Intan Paramaditha | December 10, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘In this way, people kept talking about her, and she continued to come to family gatherings. In the eyes of my relatives, she remained a problem that refused to be simplified.’

Solar Maximum: Poems by Sueyeun Juliette Lee

By Sueyeun Juliette Lee | December 8, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘Being alive has again made something new, something that may not be true of justice but is a basic commonplace in evolutionary theory. To forebear is one attitude, rising in an infinite return another.’

Terrorist-ish

By Shymala Dason | December 4, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘Shouldn’t be singing such a song, Ravi knew. But what to do? Inspiration, that was what was happening to him. He couldn’t help it. Had to let it out. He was artist. Couldn’t be always thinking about wars and horrors.’

Returning: Two Poems by Wendy Chin-Tanner

By Wendy Chin-Tanner | December 1, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘If not agates, then barnacles, if not / sweet-smelling seaweed, then shattered shells./ The traveler need not journey on. // If not mussels, then sea glass, if not // smooth surfaces, then rocks pocked by anemones. / The traveler’s journey is one of return.’

Until the Red Runs Out: Two Poems by Muriel Leung

By Muriel Leung | November 24, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘Match lit by a shadow’s curiosity. / Though I was not there for it, I still tasted their meat // and their marrow held a sweetness.’

Lycoris Radiata

By Kou Sugita | November 17, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘Do you hear / the rainfall beating / on cowhide skin / father? It is the life / of autumn, / supernova / booming’

Why I Set My Novel in an Unnamed Country

By Chaitali Sen | November 12, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

An imaginary setting gave me, a child of immigrants, the authority to write about belonging unquestionably to one’s surroundings

Great Object of the Ocean: Poems by B.B.P. Hosmillo

By B.B.P. Hosmillo | November 10, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘Your mouth a little wound with a little reason to be / involved is why alienation is a body part, which moves / you to harshly ask if death really wanted what it wanted, / if its sole duty is to be observed all the time.’

Everyday Islam: Abidah El Khalieqy’s Mataraisa

By Abidah El Khalieqy | November 6, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘But what has happened in our era? If just one vocal daring woman steps forth and speaks of the inequalities of the age and criticizes the establishment, especially those who hold authority, then she is immediately muzzled!’

Nonstop Mixing: The Bay Area’s First Filipino Mobile DJ Crew

By Oliver Wang | November 2, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

In the mid-1970s, with a DIY fog machine and light stands made of tire rims, Sound Explosion brought the experience of the discotheque back to garage parties, school dances, and weddings.

Setting a Place

By Rohan Kamicheril | October 28, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Sustainable eating can often feel like the privilege of a well-heeled elite, but how do the appetites and labor of New York City’s immigrant communities fit into the picture?

And If There Was No Country by J. Mae Barizo

By J. Mae Barizo | October 27, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘And they were a solemn people: naming / the world, mapping it out, arguing about what it meant. Clandestine as / husbands’

Bardo

By Muna Gurung | October 23, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘I wonder what happens to skin when it is robbed of touch. Does it break? Does it know to breathe? Does it forget the painful sweetness of a tickle?’

Pray Away from Our Adolescence: Poems by J.H. Yun

By J.H. Yun | October 20, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘Pastor says / abstain, says sins of the flesh, says hell. But when we see the boys / with their strong corded necks that make us crazy, we want and we do not.’

57+ Moves in Contemporary Flash Fiction

By Matthew Salesses | October 19, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Fabulism as conflict, punchlines, symbolic white space, and more

Getting to Know You: Broadway Meets Heart Mountain

By Hana C. Maruyama | October 15, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

As George Takei’s Allegiance makes its way to Broadway, a look back at how choreographer and dancer Michiko Iseri went from the Heart Mountain incarceration camp to the first production of The King and I in 1951

I’m Nature Boy: Two Poems by Albert Saijo

By Albert Saijo | October 13, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“ALL WILL COME BACK FROM ROOTS – NOTHING KILLS BLACKBERRY – BUT WHERE ARE ALL THE SPARROWS”

You are Nothing But a Dog

By Vt Hung | October 9, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“When she began crying, I thought about the rainfall in Viet Nam, how she said it was so heavy a person could hide in it.”

Red Squiggle

By Rowan Hisayo Buchanan | October 8, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

When spell check doesn’t recognize your name

Over the Fields: Two Poems by Angela Peñaredondo

By Angela Peñaredondo | October 6, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘They love long hours of blackout. / They love this snuffed out match / of a little city. To the dust that separates // stained lace. To the poor / thrum of humidity.’

Samira en Moses: A Story of [the] Lesser Pilgrimage

By Mariam Bazeed

Illustrations by Mariah Scee

| September 29, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘My father had seen us wrestle the men, had seen our bodies thrown into the sea of their desires, had seen my mother part the waves: Samira en Moses, minus divine intervention.’

Beaching: Two Poems by Jenna Le

By Jenna Le | September 29, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘The first boy that I dated weighted down his coif / with so much hair gel that the crest atop his pate / was hard as horses’ teeth’

The Night Suzy Link Goes Missing

By Lisa Ko | September 24, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘Last week some of the other kids dug a hole to China in the dirt lot behind the Purtells’ house. Down at the end of Locust Street, that swampy neverland that reeked of skunk cabbage.’

Why I Wrote a Novel About Indonesian Political Exiles

By Leila S. Chudori | September 24, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘For me, who grew up and became an adult during the New Order period, I was conscious of a historical and political absurdity. I began to feel that there were some Indonesians who had become invisible.’

Rewriting History: Leila S. Chudori’s Home

By Leila S. Chudori | September 24, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘Where was Mas Han? What was he running from? And why hadn’t he called or tried to get in contact with me? These were my questions, those of a wife, a woman, who had no idea how what had happened would affect the fate of the Indonesian people.’

Private Manning by Kazim Ali

By Kazim Ali | September 23, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘On the radio they are playing a record that is skipping. A deep-voiced woman joyfully sings, “My life has just begun– gun– gun–”’

Immigrant Cartography by Cathy Guo

By Cathy Guo | September 22, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘No others no-place/what to do but hoard the remaining solaces’

A Ghost Abroad: An Interview with Matthew Salesses

By Ed Lin | September 16, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Debut novelist of The Hundred-Year Flood talks lower-body ghosts, communication subterfuge, and American entitlement

After Yi-Fen Chou: A Forum

By AAWW | September 15, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

19 writers respond to Michael Derrick Hudson’s yellowface

While We Slept

By Muna Gurung | September 10, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘We pulled together as much of our body parts as we could. We collected everything we lost in sleep, everything we gained, as a three hour-long silence spread over Kathmandu.’

Indexing a Life

By Swati Khurana | September 10, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘The bags of paper are bodies, sitting on ledges, tucking their legs into themselves, folding smaller, hugging themselves for comfort.’

The Degenerates

By Hari Kunzru | September 10, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘Whether they know it or not, they are Middle-English archetypes, judges of good taste. Self appointed gatekeepers. In a word, critics. They know art when they see it and frankly it’s not brown.’

At the Queens Museum

By Amitava Kumar | September 10, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘Here in New York, however, the boat had a different meaning: a migrant who, despite all the baggage he must carry, is still afloat.’

Good Girls Don’t Say Such Things

By Chaya Babu | September 10, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘We saw innocence and wisdom in the dark, leather-faced fishermen in Colaba, their broken down canoes resting ashore amidst tin shanties with colorful blankets bleached by the sun and salt of the Arabian Sea’

Theft of Color by Margaret Rhee

By Margaret Rhee | September 8, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘When I ask, the histologist responds, / Cells have no color. / We use ink to color the slides.’

Watch Amitav Ghosh Talk about the Ibis Trilogy

By AAWW Staff | September 7, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Brooklyn, Opium, Diaspora, Imodium. The celebrated writer in conversation on the release of River of Smoke in 2011

Awake After Midnight

By Arnav Adhikari | September 1, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Modern Indian artists looked westward after Partition, away from the nation. An exhibit of two periods of avant-garde Indian art juxtaposes their work with contemporary artists, who ask how India can awake as a nation.

Indonesia on the Global Literary Stage

By Margaret Scott and Jyothi Natarajan | August 27, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

What does it mean to be a guest of honor at the Frankfurt Book Fair? John McGlynn talks about the Lontar Foundation’s role in bringing Indonesian literature to the world and his own path from puppet maker to translator.

The Dirt in My Knees: Two Poems by Wendy Xu

By Wendy Xu | August 25, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘The world has a sleek, hot belly / A cue of white space, an inch or several yawning before the drop, towards volta’

Night Garden: An Excerpt from Bright Lines

By Tanwi Nandini Islam | August 21, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘She planted the tiny sleeping nuggets into the ground, as a small prayer. One day, they would metamorphose, escape into the world as something altogether different.’

Rajiv Mohabir: Two Poems

By Rajiv Mohabir | August 18, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“in the jungle they hide until / the seekers, bearing lime leaves jail / them in the silver night.”

10 Videos To Make You Fall in Love with Our Green Couch

By AAWW Staff | August 12, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop
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Whether it’s Japanese dancehall pioneers, Eddie Huang’s parachute, or Roxane Gay’s advice on procrastination, we’ve captured some incredible moments you won’t want to miss.

The Bridge at No Gun Ri

By Molly Gaudry | August 11, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“I didn’t care whether they understood me, then I said, ‘Hello, hello,’ again, soldiers climbed out of their foxholes and looked at me, they couldn’t understand, but they knew where I came from, they just looked at me”

Outside the Margins: A Weekly Link Roundup

By AAWW Staff | August 7, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

US immigrant law’s influence on the “model minority” myth, “giving circles,” and a WWII veteran/rebellious photographer

The Sad Ambassador

By Ananda Devi | August 7, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘What he saw in this other world was the dust on men, not men themselves. It was the color of the land, not a history the land told.’

The Alien Crown | Poems in Sequence by Lo Kwa Mei-en

By Lo Kwa Mei-en | August 4, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Never / reaching orgasm, / the colony names its price and I, / hot cent of foreign cash, / sell it slant. Daughters / say it with ozone: my sex is a metaphor / for too much / good luck.

Outside the Margins: A Weekly Link Roundup

By AAWW Staff | July 31, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Feminist sci-fi movies, queering Islam, and injustice in America

Between Promise and Wound | Poems by R.A. Villanueva

By R.A. Villanueva | July 28, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Be calm. Soon / we will bear sentimentality, scent / what is lost in these cells with carrion, / asphodel, turpentine, forsythia / blooming somewhere in the dark.

Outside the Margins: A Weekly Link Roundup

By AAWW Staff | July 24, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Sandra Bland, reparations for British imperialism, building solidarity with #BlackLivesMatter, and more.

Not My Father’s Equal

By Julie Wu | July 24, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

I didn’t expect him to smile and say, “I love you,” as Americans did. I had never seen him smile and I would never expect him to embrace me; he never had. But perhaps there was some way—some subtle, casual way—that he could acknowledge my worth.

An Unlonely Land: Two Poems by Chen Chen

By Chen Chen | July 21, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

When did I first realize my parents were not infinite? / That I could see the end of them? Past their capes & catchphrases?

Outside the Margins: A Weekly Link Roundup

By AAWW staff | July 17, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Beloved Nintendo president passes, body shaming Serena Williams, and fighting the “model minority” myth

Nobody’s Body: Three Poems by Aimee Suzara

By Aimee Suzara | July 14, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

eating crabs with your fingers pre-Spanish fork and spoon and pre-KFC native chicken you can be served by dancing feathered natives that is true it all tastes good

Outside the Margins: A Weekly Link Roundup

By AAWW Staff | July 10, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Celebrating America, appropriating kimonos, a badass Desi henchwoman, and much more on this week’s roundup from the interweb

The Opposite of a Train

By Jennifer Tseng | July 10, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘The image of my small life without the young man was one of a library with its doors locked, or simpler and more terrifying, that of a book with half its pages missing.’

Your Closest Relative is a TV Set

By David Foote | July 8, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Writer-artist-professor Tan Lin talks fictive relatives, the narrative of an immigrant TV culture, and ‘becoming Chinese’ in America

Mộng-Lan: Two Poems

By Mộng-Lan | July 7, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

how to be clear as the earth without clinging to the sand? / flowing through my hands like water / one seed clings to my palm

Outside the Margins: A Weekly Link Roundup

By AAWW staff | July 3, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Queer Asian American history, “racist Asians,” Bobby Jindal’s shaky start, and two landmark birthdays

The Suitcase

By Sung Woo | July 3, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘Our apartment, our home, became an unfamiliar space. We still slept in the same queen bed, but no longer did we speak of upgrading to the capacious king. We could now easily fit two additional people in the valley of the bedsheet between us.’

My Computer Asks A Question: David Mura

By David Mura | June 30, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘in the haiku I send her / and the silence she sends back, / hell no, nan da yo, / call it off, snap it shut, trash / it, just let it be, let me be’

Viet Thanh Nguyen: Anger in the Asian American Novel

By Paul Tran | June 29, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The author of the bestselling novel The Sympathizer talks about reshaping histories of the Vietnam War and finding humanity in the inhuman.

An Excerpt from Viet Thanh Nguyen’s The Sympathizer

By Viet Thanh Nguyen | June 26, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“The month in question was April, the cruelest month. It was the month in which a war that had run on for a very long time would lose its limbs, as is the way of wars.”

In Memoriam: An Interview with Prashant Bhargava

By Ashok Kondabolu | June 25, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Bhargava, the late director of award-winning film Patang, reminisces about growing up in Chicago and his fascination with India’s festival of kites.

An Imaginary Lineage

By Nicholas Wong and Franny Choi | June 23, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

She petrified her / Secrets. “About what?” / That she’s been chosen. / “She chose silence.” How? / “Like the light, deeply / Fissured.

Outside the Margins: A Weekly Link Roundup

By AAWW Staff | June 19, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Grappling with Black deaths, tackling Western literary thought, celebrating Ramadan, and more.

There’s No Place Called Home

By Mei Schultz | June 19, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Gene Oishi, author of the novel Fox Drum Bebop, reflects on the Japanese American story beyond the wartime experience.

An Expelled Tongue: Translating Kim Hyesoon

By Emily Yoon | June 16, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Poet Don Mee Choi discusses the myth of fluency and what happens when translation is allowed to be hysterical

Kim Hyesoon: Two Poems

By Kim Hyesoon | June 16, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

How scared God must have been / when the woman who ate all the fruit of the tree he’d planted / was cutting out each red body from / between her legs

The Last Living Aztec

By Lisa Chen | June 12, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘Perhaps it was not what he did so much as how he put it. He insisted on “killed” not “terminated.” He refused “vertical chamber apparatus” in favor of the lurid “pit of despair.” But he also called love “love.” What reason was there to pretend otherwise?’

Authenticity Obsession, or Conceptualism as Minstrel Show

By Ken Chen | June 11, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

What recent race scandals by avant-garde poets Kenneth Goldsmith and Vanessa Place have to do with sunglasses, the invention of the fingerprint, and the atom bomb.

Four Poems by José Garcia Villa

By Jose Garcia Villa | June 9, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“In my desire to be Nude / I clothed myself in fire:— / Burned down my walls, my roof / Burned all these down.”

Quandary (1943-1945)

By Gene Oishi | June 5, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘Over the past three years, the desert had become Hiroshi’s home. Hacienda seemed very far away to him, both in terms of time and distance, and he didn’t want to go back.’ An excerpt from Gene Oishi’s Fox Drum Bebop

Timothy Liu: Two Poems

By Timothy Liu | June 2, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Such atonalities / caught floating through four centuries / in flagrant delicto bear witness

Loyal Roads to Betrayal: An Interview with Ha Jin

By Anelise Chen | June 1, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The writer discusses China before and since Tiananmen, abandoned enemy spies, and how solidarity will build a nation.

I See My Eye in Your Eye

By Bonnie Chau | May 29, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘As children, she liked purple, I liked pink. She liked turkey, I liked ham. She liked American cheese, I liked Swiss.’

Phototactic Tactics: Four Poems by Kimiko Hahn

By Kimiko Hahn | May 26, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

swimming six thousand feet to the surface / the lights lure curiosity / from a sudden clearing / to the gingerbread house / where a hand has lighted the wick

Li Shangyin: Two Poems

By Li Shangyin | May 19, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Upon entering a shrine, it seems to hold ghosts / The belly of an abbess suggests pregnancy / Behind a heavy curtain, the suggestion of people

Fatimah Asghar: Two Poems

By Fatimah Asghar | May 12, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

They send flowers before guns now / all the thorns plucked from the stems. / An order to weave the dirge / before the mortar sings.

Outside the Margins: A Weekly Link Roundup

By AAWW Staff | May 8, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

TV as a battleground for diversity, JiHAE’s newest video, the lack of AA tech execs, and more.

Fortune and Riot

By MK Hall | May 8, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘The Korean community has a special name for the LA riots: Sa-I-Gu, Four-Two-Nine, the day it all began.’

Papad

By Suketu Mehta | May 7, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

At the short end of Bombay’s boom-to-bust cycle

Outside the Margins: A Weekly Link Roundup

By | May 1, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Obama on emojis, Pacquiao v. Mayweather, protests on the Japanese Prime Minister, and more.

Music Maps: Three Poems by Warren Liu

By Warren Liu | April 28, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

If these are ghosts, trace them / in the dismal notes of the gutter, / the window’s drumming murmur

Such As by Wo Chan

By Wo Chan | April 21, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

I was the smell of ripe lemons in his oxbone nation. I was never / brave. But, he let me eat butter, held me like an egg.

Locked Eyes: Three Poems by Monica Sok

By Monica Sok | April 14, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

I will float down the stream / until it ends. / Until it ends, the mines avoid me.

Aamer Rahman: How to be Angry and Artistic at the Same Time

By Esther Wang | April 13, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The Australian comedian chats about Iggy Azalea, why he doesn’t write jokes for white people, and the power of post-9/11 comedy.

Kazuo Ishiguro: My Own Private Japan

By Ken Chen | April 7, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The novelist talks about his favorite samurai movies, the violence of imperialism, and his struggle to remember Japan

Canzone II by Eric Gamalinda

By Eric Gamalinda | April 7, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

I live inside this world that lives inside / me: in this dream, there is nowhere to hide.

Outside the Margins: A Weekly Link Roundup

By AAWW Staff | April 3, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Tasty Chinese-Mexican food, Zayn’s post-One Direction plans, review of The Sympathizer, and more.

Then I Was Blue

By Rowan Hisayo Buchanan | April 1, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

One night, I said, I wish I could tattoo myself onto you.

The PEN Ten with Dorothy Tse

By Ken Chen | March 31, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“Every word becomes dangerous when words fall into a wave of social movements.”

Blessed Bodies

By Dorothy Tse | March 30, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“The mother, seeing her one-armed son standing in the doorway, was not surprised. It was as she had foreseen.”

Outside the Margins: A Weekly Link Roundup

By AAWW Staff | March 27, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Body-shaming culture, Purdue’s new cultural center, representation in video games, and more.

Eugenia Leigh: Three Poems

By Eugenia Leigh | March 24, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

My mother left my father more than once. A favorite / family tradition observed when I was four. / Ten. Eleven. Twelve. Leaving is easier / the second time.

The Lark Essays

By AAWW Staff | March 23, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Bushra Rehman’s “Two Truths and a Lie” writing workshop was held up at gunpoint last fall. Three writers tell the story of what happened and join a conversation about gentrification and police violence in NYC.

Outside the Margins: A Weekly Link Roundup

By AAWW Staff | March 20, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The relationship of food and culture, an interview with Kevin Na, the poorly conceived #RaceTogether campaign, and more.

Lights of Spring: Two Poems by Hoa Nguyen

By Hoa Nguyen | March 17, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Rage dented the silver / trashcan / “fire-crack” or “schrack”

Outside the Margins: A Weekly Link Roundup

By AAWW Staff | March 13, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Peek behind the scenes on an Asian American foodie adventure, attend boba school, learn where New Orlean’s two Chinatowns went, and more.

The Limits of Diversity

By Jennifer Pan | March 12, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

How the feel-good politics of multiculturalism have blinded the literary world to the roots of racial inequality

Aubade for Winter

By Sandra Lim and Aimee Nezhukumatathil | March 10, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

I went to see what people are really like / in a thousand human ways.

Outside the Margins: A Weekly Link Roundup

By AAWW | March 6, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Nina Pham’s path towards recovery, the legacy Momofuku Ando leaves behind, Jin’s comeback story, and more.

Lines of Sight: Visual Art in Asian American Poetry

By Michael Leong | March 3, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The work of nine ekphrastic poets

Provenance Unknown

By Vinita Ramani | February 26, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

In a country where every other street corner, rice field, or pagoda is potentially the former site of a mass crime, how Cambodia has imagined collective reparations after the Khmer Rouge

Three Poems by Emily Yoon

By Emily Yoon | February 24, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

I should have pinned you / to that wall, but you have walked already / out of that drawn-on door.

Picking Battles with Jillian Tamaki

By Annie Ishii | February 12, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The 2015 Caldecott Honor-winning artist talks about adoption, race, and visibility in the coming-of-age graphic novel This One Summer.

All Joking Aside: Jenny Zhang and Monica McClure

By Jenny Zhang and Monica McClure | February 6, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

A conversation about humor, race, and the search for decolonized jokes

The Disaster: Marie Mutsuki Mockett’s Where the Dead Pause

By Marie Matskui Mockett | January 29, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Coming to terms with grief after the 2011 Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami

Lost Footage from a Dual Pilgrimage Home

By Ragini Tharoor Srinivasan | January 27, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Amarnath Ravva’s American Canyon gravitates between Northern California and South India as he reenacts rituals and shares histories of both his homes.

I Can’t Breathe

By Luis Francia | December 19, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

A poem in memory of Eric Garner: “No offense, Officer, if I don’t / take to your charm offensive, or is / it your offensive charm”

Elisha Lim: A Way to Draw Others

By Anne Ishii | December 11, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Toronto-based graphic novelist Elisha Lim talks about the people behind their latest book 100 Crushes, their Singaporean-Catholic aversion to gluttony, and what jealousy is really about.

Being Watched

By Adnan Khan | November 25, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

With alluring and peculiar prose and a playfully erratic approach to structure, Ghalib Islam’s debut novel mirrors the anxiety of buckling under the burden of surveillance.

Hong Kong’s Umbrella Movement: Four Poems

By Chung Kwok Keung, Tang Siu Wa, Dorothy Tse, and Liu Waitong | November 21, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“In the smoke, they forget their bare feet / as they see their faces more clearly than ever… No trial can strike down / their small and fragile umbrellas.”

Rabih Alameddine: The Interior Landscape

By Youmna Chlala | November 12, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The National Book Award finalist and author of An Unnecessary Woman talks about mothers, thievery, and his homebody fabulousness.

Fred Ho’s Radical Imagination

By Diane Fujino | October 17, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“I fear that we’ll remember Fred’s evocative style, but forget his penetrating political substance.” On remembering what not to forget.

Writing Into Silence

By Bushra Rehman | October 16, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Cathy Linh Che talks about her debut collection of poems, Split, and what it means to mimic flashbacks of war, immigration, and sexual violence.

Jillian Tamaki’s Eileen Fisher Armor

By Anne Ishii | October 9, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The artist and illustrator of Skim and This One Summer talks about the tension of tween-hood, body types in mainstream comics, and why purple is the warmest color.

A GIF Is a Moment’s Monument

By Hossannah Asuncion | September 30, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

An interview with R.A. Villanueva on getting published, what a good GIF and a good poem have in common, and the right way to pronounce GIF

The Body Artist

By Kate Woodsome | September 17, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Treating the invisible wounds of America’s violent past, Rajkamal Kahlon edges closer to finding peace in herself.

Bavarian Forest

By Humera Afridi | September 13, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Killed by the Gestapo 70 years ago, today, special agent Noorunisa Inayat Khan inspires with messages in code. A reflection and poem.

Michael DeForge Is Not the Weirdo His Characters Are

By Anne Ishii | September 3, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

I interviewed Michael DeForge and all I got was a story about needles in a urethra.

Outside the Margins: Weekly Link Roundup

By AAWW staff | August 22, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Ferguson and readings on anti-black racism, Asian Americans, and complicity

Koyama Press: Saving Artists, One Canadian at a Time

By Anne Ishii | August 19, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Resident comics expert Anne Ishii hangs out with kickass Toronto-based comics publisher Annie Koyama.

Outside the Margins: A Weekly Link Roundup

By AAWW staff | August 15, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Superheroes of color, Arabelle Sicardi, sci-fi films from the global south, Molly Crabapple’s Abu Dhabi, Ferguson, n+1 takes on Tao Lin, and more.

Body Plus Poem

By Yasmin Majeed | August 12, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

An interview with spoken word duo DarkMatter on radical desis, the legacy of Partition, Twitter poems and The Perks of Being a Wallflower

A Hundred Flowers of Revolutionary Hope

By Bill V. Mullen | August 10, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“Fred Ho flooded my ears with essential facts about the history of Afro-Asian political and cultural struggle”

The Ghosts They Carried

By Kitana Ananda | August 6, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Shyam Selvadurai’s latest novel reckons with the violence that haunts the lives of many in post-war Sri Lanka.

(Un)American, (Un)Cool

By Kavita Das | August 4, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

What the marginalization of Asian Americans in an exhibition at the National Portrait Gallery says about the appropriation of “cool.”

Acid House Was Born in a Mumbai Basement

By Ryan Wong | July 31, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

How Bollywood demo musician Charanjit Singh peered into the future of electronic music

A Soundtrack to Ed Lin’s New Novel, Ghost Month

By Ed Lin | July 30, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The sounds of Taipei, from farting mopeds to bustling night markets, unfold through tracks by Joy Division, Asobi Sekksu, Dum Dum Girls and more

Reading Kazim Ali’s Fasting for Ramadan

By Nadia Q. Ahmad | July 25, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“It’s always easier to fast with another person. We feed each other our hunger.”

ABCD: Who Are You Calling Confused?

By Kishwer Vikaas | July 24, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

A look back at the history behind ‘American Born Confused Desi’ and where it’s gone since

Studio Visit: Kelly Zen-Yie Tsai

By Ryan Wong | July 22, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

A group of artists, writers, and musicians led by Kelly Tsai is teaming up to put on a multi-media performance based on the work of Ai Weiwei

A Picture of Us

By Mia Kang | July 16, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Mia Kang interviews filmmaker J.P Chan about his latest film, and casting Asian actors in lead roles

May You Never Find Such Music Again

By Nicole Sealey | July 11, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

A review of Matthew Olzmann’s Mezzanines

Serve the People at the Bottom: Yuri Kochiyama

By Scott Kurashige | July 9, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Yuri’s indefatigable effort to build solidarity among all activists and oppressed people is what many will likely see as the hallmark of her legacy.

An Impossible Present: Five Poets from Nanjing

By Dong Sun | July 2, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

What time and place can call you home? are you an epiphany? a question? / Is it something / you only pretended to welcome, something you’ve come to regret?

Ashok and Mary Talk Chapstick, Hipster Racism, and Korean Names

By Ashok Kondabolu | June 20, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

An interview with writer and former editor-in-chief of Missbehave magazine Mary H.K. Choi

The Dream of Shoji – Poems by Kimiko Hahn

By Kimiko Hahn | June 17, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

How to say milk? How to say sand, snow, sow, / linen, cloud, cocoon, or albino?

Apiology, with Stigma and Other Poems

By Sally Wen Mao | June 13, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

I don’t teach my girls / to brave the violence of sun, sons, or stings. / When resources run out, don’t sit there and behave. / Abandon hive.

There Was Cesar Chavez, and There Was Carlos Bulosan

By Nita Noveno | June 11, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

When Stockton, California was the capital of Filipina/o America. An interview with Dawn Mabalon on the lost history of Filipinos in the organized labor movement, and the stories of women that went untold.

Poems for Tiananmen by Liu Xia and Liao Yiwu

By Liu Xia and Liao Yiwu | June 4, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“Eyes will return tonight / with their ghosts / in the shape of tombstones.” On the 25th anniversary of June 4th, 1989.

Letters to Doc

By Cathy Linh Che | June 3, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

I look up at the trees. / Like me, they have disrobed. / They have disarmed me

25 Years After the Tiananmen Crackdown

By Mel Chin and Bob Lee | June 2, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop
Tags: ,

In response to the Tiananmen Square protests and crackdown of 1989, the Asian American Arts Centre organized a landmark exhibition of artworks. To commemorate the protest’s 25th anniversary, The Margins partnered with Creative Time Reports to interview the artists involved.

A Cupcake Is Identity As Much As Syntax Is Identity

By Abeer Hoque | May 28, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

A review of Tarfia Faizullah’s debut poetry collection Seam, and an interview with the poet

All The Colors of Life: A Celebration of Fred Ho

By Marie Incontrera | May 21, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“…I was more apprentice than student, and he was more family than friend. Our time together bridged the waters of music and delved into politics, healing, life, and death.”

Beyond Asian American Jazz

By Fred Ho | May 19, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

In 1999, Fred Ho reflected on his political and musical evolution, from the Asian American Movement on.

From Banana to Third World Marxist

By Fred Ho | May 16, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“Spock was good in math and science; so was I. Spock tended to suppress his emotions (his human side), and so did I.” Fred Ho on coming of age.

To Walk the Gauntlet of Fire: Remembering a Mentor

By Kanya D'Almeida | May 14, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

A former student recalls the ups-and-downs of Ho’s cult of personality.

Remembrance/Revolution: A Tribute to Fred Ho

By AAWW | May 14, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Colleagues, collaborators, and friends remember political and musical visionary Fred Ho.

Our Complicity With Excess

By Vijay Iyer | May 7, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

To succeed in America means that at some level you’ve made peace with its rather ugly past. Vijay Iyer’s speech to Yale’s Asian American alumni

Known Unknowns of the Class War

By Naeem Mohaiemen | May 2, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

A review of Zia Haider Rahman’s In the Light of What We Know

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