Articles in the Everything Category
177 Results

Bavarian Forest

By Humera Afridi | September 13, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Killed by the Gestapo 70 years ago, today, special agent Noorunisa Inayat Khan inspires with messages in code. A reflection and poem.

Michael DeForge Is Not the Weirdo His Characters Are

By Anne Ishii | September 3, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

I interviewed Michael DeForge and all I got was a story about needles in a urethra.

Outside the Margins: Weekly Link Roundup

By AAWW staff | August 22, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Ferguson and readings on anti-black racism, Asian Americans, and complicity

Koyama Press: Saving Artists, One Canadian at a Time

By Anne Ishii | August 19, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Resident comics expert Anne Ishii hangs out with kickass Toronto-based comics publisher Annie Koyama.

Outside the Margins: A Weekly Link Roundup

By AAWW staff | August 15, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Superheroes of color, Arabelle Sicardi, sci-fi films from the global south, Molly Crabapple’s Abu Dhabi, Ferguson, n+1 takes on Tao Lin, and more.

Body Plus Poem

By Yasmin Majeed | August 12, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

An interview with spoken word duo DarkMatter on radical desis, the legacy of Partition, Twitter poems and The Perks of Being a Wallflower

A Hundred Flowers of Revolutionary Hope

By Bill V. Mullen | August 10, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“Fred Ho flooded my ears with essential facts about the history of Afro-Asian political and cultural struggle”

The Ghosts They Carried

By Kitana Ananda | August 6, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Shyam Selvadurai’s latest novel reckons with the violence that haunts the lives of many in post-war Sri Lanka.

(Un)American, (Un)Cool

By Kavita Das | August 4, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

What the marginalization of Asian Americans in an exhibition at the National Portrait Gallery says about the appropriation of “cool.”

Acid House Was Born in a Mumbai Basement

By Ryan Wong | July 31, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

How Bollywood demo musician Charanjit Singh peered into the future of electronic music

A Soundtrack to Ed Lin’s New Novel, Ghost Month

By Ed Lin | July 30, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The sounds of Taipei, from farting mopeds to bustling night markets, unfold through tracks by Joy Division, Asobi Sekksu, Dum Dum Girls and more

Reading Kazim Ali’s Fasting for Ramadan

By Nadia Q. Ahmad | July 25, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“It’s always easier to fast with another person. We feed each other our hunger.”

ABCD: Who Are You Calling Confused?

By Kishwer Vikaas | July 24, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

A look back at the history behind ‘American Born Confused Desi’ and where it’s gone since

Studio Visit: Kelly Zen-Yie Tsai

By Ryan Wong | July 22, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

A group of artists, writers, and musicians led by Kelly Tsai is teaming up to put on a multi-media performance based on the work of Ai Weiwei

A Picture of Us

By Mia Kang | July 16, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Mia Kang interviews filmmaker J.P Chan about his latest film, and casting Asian actors in lead roles

May You Never Find Such Music Again

By Nicole Sealey | July 11, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

A review of Matthew Olzmann’s Mezzanines

Serve the People at the Bottom: Yuri Kochiyama

By Scott Kurashige | July 9, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Yuri’s indefatigable effort to build solidarity among all activists and oppressed people is what many will likely see as the hallmark of her legacy.

An Impossible Present: Five Poets from Nanjing

By Dong Sun | July 2, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

What time and place can call you home? are you an epiphany? a question? / Is it something / you only pretended to welcome, something you’ve come to regret?

Ashok and Mary Talk Chapstick, Hipster Racism, and Korean Names

By Ashok Kondabolu | June 20, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

An interview with writer and former editor-in-chief of Missbehave magazine Mary H.K. Choi

The Dream of Shoji – Poems by Kimiko Hahn

By Kimiko Hahn | June 17, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

How to say milk? How to say sand, snow, sow, / linen, cloud, cocoon, or albino?

Apiology, with Stigma and Other Poems

By Sally Wen Mao | June 13, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

I don’t teach my girls / to brave the violence of sun, sons, or stings. / When resources run out, don’t sit there and behave. / Abandon hive.

There Was Cesar Chavez, and There Was Carlos Bulosan

By Nita Noveno | June 11, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

When Stockton, California was the capital of Filipina/o America. An interview with Dawn Mabalon on the lost history of Filipinos in the organized labor movement, and the stories of women that went untold.

Poems for Tiananmen by Liu Xia and Liao Yiwu

By Liu Xia and Liao Yiwu | June 4, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“Eyes will return tonight / with their ghosts / in the shape of tombstones.” On the 25th anniversary of June 4th, 1989.

Letters to Doc

By Cathy Linh Che | June 3, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

I look up at the trees. / Like me, they have disrobed. / They have disarmed me

25 Years After the Tiananmen Crackdown

By Mel Chin and Bob Lee | June 2, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop
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In response to the Tiananmen Square protests and crackdown of 1989, the Asian American Arts Centre organized a landmark exhibition of artworks. To commemorate the protest’s 25th anniversary, The Margins partnered with Creative Time Reports to interview the artists involved.

A Cupcake Is Identity As Much As Syntax Is Identity

By Abeer Hoque | May 28, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

A review of Tarfia Faizullah’s debut poetry collection Seam, and an interview with the poet

All The Colors of Life: A Celebration of Fred Ho

By Marie Incontrera | May 21, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“…I was more apprentice than student, and he was more family than friend. Our time together bridged the waters of music and delved into politics, healing, life, and death.”

Beyond Asian American Jazz

By Fred Ho | May 19, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

In 1999, Fred Ho reflected on his political and musical evolution, from the Asian American Movement on.

From Banana to Third World Marxist

By Fred Ho | May 16, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“Spock was good in math and science; so was I. Spock tended to suppress his emotions (his human side), and so did I.” Fred Ho on coming of age.

To Walk the Gauntlet of Fire: Remembering a Mentor

By Kanya D'Almeida | May 14, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

A former student recalls the ups-and-downs of Ho’s cult of personality.

Remembrance/Revolution: A Tribute to Fred Ho

By AAWW | May 14, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Colleagues, collaborators, and friends remember political and musical visionary Fred Ho.

Our Complicity With Excess

By Vijay Iyer | May 7, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

To succeed in America means that at some level you’ve made peace with its rather ugly past. Vijay Iyer’s speech to Yale’s Asian American alumni

Known Unknowns of the Class War

By Naeem Mohaiemen | May 2, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

A review of Zia Haider Rahman’s In the Light of What We Know

Bangladesh: A Thousand Words

By AAWW | April 25, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

In a collection of poetry and prose, writers respond to the work of Bengali photographers exhibited in Eyes on Bangladesh

Munem Wasif: Learning How to Look

By Abeer Hoque | April 16, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Abeer Hoque interviews a celebrated Bangladeshi documentary photographer whose work recently made its way to an exhibit in New York City

A Global Jim Crow

By Vijay Prashad | April 15, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Vijay Prashad at the Brecht Forum. Plus, how Kumar Goshal (1899-1971) carved out a theory of US imperialism in the African American press.

The Bodyguard

By Tom Cho | April 14, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“Someone is stalking Whitney Houston and I have been hired to be her bodyguard”—an excerpt from Tom Cho’s Look Who’s Morphing

The Swamp of this Moment

By Jyothi Natarajan | April 11, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

An interview with Akhil Sharma, author of Family Life, on how to write a novel that has no plot, literary modernism’s influence, and remembering India

Brother-life by Akhil Sharma

By Akhil Sharma | April 7, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“While a part of me was glad I wasn’t like my brother, no part of me wished to be more fortunate than my mother.”

A Coolie Woman’s Work is Never Done

By Annie Paul | March 31, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Gaiutra Bahadur unearths buried stories of indenture—those of women who battled rigid patriarchy on either side of the black water.

First Days in Radical America

By Vijay Prashad | March 18, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Lessons on how life in the US was worth much more if spent in solidarity with those who suffer at its heel

Break the Silence

By Aziz Rana | March 18, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Cultural critic Vijay Prashad and legal scholar Aziz Rana discuss the legacy of multiculturalism, and what’s left of third-world solidarities.

Studio Visit: Eugenia Kim

By Eugenia Kim | March 14, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

With the novelist who long thought she was a Korean American impostor

Studio Visit: Marie Mockett

By Marie Mockett | March 7, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The author of Picking Bones from Ash on Japanese Buddhism, tsunami survivors, and her trip into the “exclusion zone”

Refusal=Intervention

By Eunsong K. & Don Mee Choi | March 7, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“Asian American Poetry” is not a manageable category—it is not a list.

Yellow Peril: 19th-Century Scapegoating

By John Kuo Wei Tchen and Dylan Yeats | March 5, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

How fear of the “the mob” turned into racial exclusion. Excerpts from a recently published archive of anti-Asian fear

Studio Visit: Oliver Wang

By Oliver Wang | February 28, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The L.A.-based music critic-scholar on border crossing, his “West Coast vibe”, and why we should leave the guilt and take the pleasure

An Invitation: Calling All Literary Baghdads

By AAWW | February 24, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

From Ibn al-Nadim’s Kitāb al-Fihrist to Al-Mutanabbi Street

Where We Live Now Was Once Mourned

By Chang-rae Lee | February 13, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

An excerpt from Chang-rae Lee’s On Such A Full Sea

Fu Manchu and Lao She

By Jeffrey Wasserstrom | February 4, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Where the “Yellow Peril incarnate” meets one novelist’s depictions of China and its diaspora in the early 20th century

Liao Yiwu: Four Years a Prisoner

By Jiayang Fan | January 28, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

An interview with the exiled Chinese poet on writing from prison, false patriotism, and the responsibility of intellectuals

Einstein Saves Hiroshima

By Phong Nguyen | January 23, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

We were both Ahab; the difference was that Einstein, when he set out on the ink-black sea, knew not what monster he had been pursuing.

The Humor and Horror of Historical Absurdity

By Mark Putterman | January 23, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

An interview with author Phong Nguyen on his latest book, Pages from the Textbook of Alternate History

“Stet” and Other Poems

By Tamiko Beyer | January 13, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

My palms cannot hold back the shifting currents. / They can slap a rhythm, hoist / a banner, hold / your face tenderly between them

The World Is Full of Paper. Write to Me.

By Sejal Shah | December 8, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Remembering Agha Shahid Ali, 12 years after his passing

“I’m Really Sorry for That Horrible Line Break”

By Henry W. Leung | December 6, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

An interview with poet Tung-Hui Hu

This Literary Lion

By Rohit Chopra | November 25, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Salman Rushdie’s multitudes, from his visionary early work to the celebrity he has become

9/11/11

By April Naoko Heck | November 20, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

I hate you, poem, for wanting to know the truth. / The truth is, I trusted the sky. / Trusted it wouldn’t throw things at us

Two Poems by R.A. Villanueva

By R.A. Villanueva | November 20, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The rivers / and trenches glossed with light / know we are so relentless as to plan / for catastrophe

What Kind of New World Would This Be?

By Gaiutra Bahadur | November 11, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

An excerpt from Coolie Woman, Gaiutra Bahadur’s new book about hidden histories of indentured labor migration

Looking Back at Sikh Resistance

By Sonny Singh | November 7, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

100 years on, how lessons from the Ghadar movement show the limits of civil rights efforts in the US today.

Illiteracy

By Feng Sun Chen | November 6, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The key to enjoying the jubilant, fleshy dread of Feng Sun Chen’s supercut poem is appreciating what one might call the bodily turn in poetry.

Songs of Revolt

By Ali Mir, Bushra Rehman, Purvi Shah, and Syed Mohammed Shahed | October 29, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Poetic responses to the literature of the Ghadar movement

Echoes of Mutiny

By J. Daniel Elam | October 25, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

On the centenntial of its founding, a short history of the Ghadr Party, and the ghosts that live on

Alan Chin’s Toishan

By Alan Chin | October 23, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

A photojournalist returns to his ancestral home to capture what is left of a long history of migration between China and the US.

An Oral History of Page Turner

By AAWW | October 22, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The salty snacks, unlikely yarns, and auspicious readings at this year’s AAWW food and books festival

Sea Time | from The People in the Trees by Hanya Yanagihara

By Hanya Yanagihara | October 16, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“It had always been that one of Norton’s fondest dreams—the dream, I think, of many brilliant and overextended men—was that one month, or one year, he’d find himself in a warm place with absolutely no commitments.”

Studio Visit | Page Turner Edition: Porochista Khakpour

By Porochista Khakpour | October 4, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

This Iranian American novelist wants to live forever.

Studio Visit | Page Turner Edition: Victoria Chang

By Victoria Chang | October 3, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The author of The Boss thinks she might be the only person left on this planet without an iPod—but her poems are certianly full of music.

10 Things to Read Before Saturday

By AAWW | October 2, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

A taste of what’s in store at this year’s Page Turner Festival

Unquarantined

By Brian Leung | October 2, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Rahul Mehta and new pathways for the hyphenated writer

Salman Rushdie, Edward Said, and Moral Courage

By Sarah Waheed | September 26, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The legacy of an intellectual friendship in an age of Islamophobia—on the 10-year anniversary of Said’s death.

Since Tao Lin Declined

By Anelise Chen | September 24, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Notes for a hypothetical interview with the author re: Taipei, living in the present, memory, moral responsibility, technology, zen, etc.

The Authentic Outsider

By V.V. Ganeshananthan | September 19, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Bill Cheng, Anthony Marra, and the freedom to write what you don’t know.

Legal Dramas, Mad Men, and the Evolution of the Fictional Female Lawyer

By Anne Ishii | September 16, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

A look at entertainment lawyer Helen Wan’s debut novel, The Partner Track.

Two Truths, Many Lies, and a Novel

By Swati Marquez | September 10, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Swati Marquez interviews Bushra Rehman on her new work of fiction, Corona

A Soundtrack to “Southern Cross the Dog”

By Bill Cheng | August 28, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Bill Cheng talks us through his five favorite blues musicians, and how their work inspired his debut novel.

Studio Visit: Meena Alexander

By Meena Alexander | August 23, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

This New York-based poet once dreamt of being a trapeze artist.

If Death Is a Postman

By Sinan Antoon | August 21, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

An excerpt from Sinan Antoon’s novel, “The Corpse Washer”

Studio Visit: Kazim Ali

By Kazim Ali | August 16, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

On Sunday afternoons, you may often find poet Kazim Ali at the roller rink.

Misperfectly Matched

By V.V. Ganeshananthan | August 12, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

V.V. Ganeshananthan interviews Soman Chainani about his new bestselling children’s book, The School for Good and Evil.

Studio Visit: Henry Chang

By Henry Chang | August 9, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

A native son of Chinatown and the Lower East Side, the author of the Detective Jack Yu series makes a mean pitcher of Bloody Mary.

Fresh Off the Boat: Miss Info Interviews Eddie Huang

By AAWW Staff | August 8, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Watch the conversation between the BaoHaus bad boy and the Hot 97 host

Are We Trayvon Martin?

By I.Y. Lee | August 6, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Where Asian Americans fall in our broken criminal justice system

Studio Visit: Marie Myung-Ok Lee

By Marie Myung-Ok Lee | August 2, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Asian American Writers’ Workshop cofounder Marie Myung-Ok Lee kicks off our new weekly Q&A series with writers.

The Boss

By Victoria Chang | July 31, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Four Poems by Victoria Chang

Ashok and Randall Park Celebrate Father’s Day

By Ashok Kondabolu | July 26, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Actor, writer, and father Randall Park shares an hour on the phone with Ashok Kondabolu, recalling his childhood in LA and how he stumbled into acting.

The Ultimate Femme Fatale: Noir in Manila

By Jessica Hagedorn | July 16, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Jessica Hagedorn writes about the city of her birth, where “either nothing surprises you, or everything does.”

Tending the Speculative: Poems from the Asian American Adoptee Diaspora

By The Line Break | July 5, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Jennifer Kwon Dobbs, inquiring into a poetics emerging from the adopted diasporic condition, guest-curates a portfolio of poems for The Line Break.

The City of Devi: Jaz

By Manil Suri | June 19, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

A man in search of his ex-lover looks back on his coming of age—from Manil Suri’s pre-apocalyptic novel set in Mumbai

She Danced While a Nation Burnt

By Luis H. Francia | May 23, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

In his musical operatic tribute to the former first lady of the Philippines, David Byrne leans on pop psychology to tell the story of the “steel butterfly.”

In the Company of Salman Rushdie

By AAWW | May 20, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“It’s a little terrifying to be so influential. By which I mean, it’s really moving to have these wonderful writers come and share my work with all of you.”

Six Things to Know About Salman Rushdie

By AAWW | May 3, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Lesser known facts about the celebrated author—from his days sweating ad copy to his latest gig as a television screenwriter

Ashok and Annie Hit the Backyard

By Ashok Kondabolu | April 23, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Ashok Kondabolu of Das Racist catches up with documentary photographer Annie Ling at her Brooklyn apartment.

Minority Rules: 2050, According to Oyama Enrico Isamu Letter

By Oyama Enrico Isamu Letter | April 17, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

In three decades, the United States will have a “majority-minority” population. We asked four artists to consider this demographic shift. Here is Oyama Enrico Isamu Letter, an abstract artist and painter who draws on the visual elements of graffiti culture.

Excerpt: ‘The Last Hour of the Bengal Tiger’ from Revenge

By Yoko Ogawa | March 22, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“I suddenly noticed an odor in the air. It was sweet and persistent but not at all unpleasant. I took a deep breath and let myself be guided by the smell.”

Excerpt: H.T. Tsiang’s The Hanging on Union Square

By H.T. Tsiang | March 15, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“Nut was hungry. Nut had to move.” Originally self-published in 1935, this hallucinatory, quasi-experimental novel follows the peripatetic musings of a young man throughout a single day in Depression-era New York.

The Skin I’m In

By Naeem Mohaiemen | February 20, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Scholar Vivek Bald chronicles an early lost history of a time of Black-Bengali racial solidarity

Straddling Convention: The Erotic in Asian American Poetry

By Ocean Vuong | February 14, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Ocean Vuong, in search of the “new erotic,” guest-curates a portfolio of poems in time for Valentine’s Day.

Letter From a Hotel Room in Centum City

By Alex Jung | February 7, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“I logged onto the Internet and searched for others like me. I never found them, but I invited them over to my hotel room anyway.”

Zany, Cute, Interesting: Sianne Ngai on Our Aesthetic Categories

By Sianne Ngai | February 7, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“The commodity aesthetic of cuteness, the discursive aesthetic of the interesting, and the performative aesthetic of zaniness help us get at some of the most important social dynamics underlying life in late capitalist society today.”

Wednesday Clicks: Marguerite Duras, Godemichets, That (Psy and) Pistachios Ad

By Anne Ishii | February 6, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Link bait for hump day.

Minority Rules: 2050, According to Jeff Ng

By Jeff Ng | February 5, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

In three decades, the United States will have a “majority-minority” population. We asked four artists to consider this demographic shift. Sharing his vision of 2050 is Jeff Ng, a designer better known as jeffstaple and the founder of Staple Design.

Minority Rules: 2050, According to Jaret Vadera

By Jaret Vadera | January 31, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

In three decades, the United States will have a “majority-minority” population. We asked four artists to consider this demographic shift. Here is Jaret Vadera, an interdisciplinary artist based in New York and interested in the hidden structures of power.

Fresh Off the Boat, Fresh Off the Shelf: Eddie Huang at B&N Tonight

By | January 29, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Baohaus bad boy and Workshop board member Eddie Huang reads from his new memoir tonight. Where will you be?

The Children of 1965

By Min Song | January 24, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

In an excerpt from a forthcoming book, English professor Min Song reflects on undergraduate “Great Books” courses, the Helen Vendler-Rita Dove debate, and the first time he read a Siu Sin Far story.

Unacceptable Suffering: Rey Chow on Michael Haneke and Pornography

By Jennifer Pan | January 24, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Cultural critic Rey Chow discusses her new book—including how the acclaimed Austrian filmmaker’s “staging of the extreme” gestures toward the pornographic.

Minority Rules: 2050, According to An Xiao Mina

By An Xiao Mina | January 23, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

In three decades, the United States will have a “majority-minority” population. We asked four artists to consider this demographic shift. First up is An Xiao Mina, a designer and artist who focuses on the role of technology in building communities.

Scattered Sand: China’s Migrant Workers Get a Voice

By RYAN WONG | January 9, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

An interview with journalist Hsiao-Hung Pai, whose book Scattered Sand tells the stories of Chinese migrant workers—direct from their mouths.

Happy Controversy: Danish Ali and Ali Gul Pir on Their First US Comedy Tour

By Jen Kwok | December 12, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The two comics chat with fellow comedian Jen Kwok about emergency generators, censorship, and the most-viewed YouTube video in Pakistan.

Excerpt: Lament in the Night

By Shōson Nagahara | December 6, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Originally published in Japanese in 1925, this naturalist noir masterpiece follows itinerant day laborer Ishikawa Sazuko as he prowls the back alleys of Los Angeles, looking for a meal, a job, or just some companionship. With an introduction by translator Andrew Leong.

Writing Tips: “Acquire a cat.”

By Emma Straub | December 3, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop
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Emma Straub, author of Laura Lamont’s Life in Pictures, on why a feline companion might make you a better writer.

Speaker in a Future Age: Ed Bok Lee on Poetry, Places and the Death of Tongues

By Sueyeun Juliette Lee | November 28, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“I have a mole on the bottom of my foot, and some of my more superstitious relatives told me that if you have a mole on the sole of one foot, you’ll always yearn to visit new places more than most.”

Writing Tips: “Style without story is an empty suit.”

By Alexander Chee | November 20, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop
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Whiting Award-winner Alexander Chee on post-its, the virtues of retyping, and committing to the process.

Meet Hualing Nieh, Mo Yan’s “Literary Mother”

By Jeff Tompkins | November 9, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Orhan Pamuk and Mo Yan, Noble Prize winners in Literature, were both writers-in-residence at the prestigious International Writing Program. An interview with IWP’s current director about one of the program’s founders, the remarkable Chinese novelist Hualing Nieh.

I Am Your Mirror: O Zhang’s Blank, Visionary Billboards

By Gaiutra Bahadur | November 7, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Following in the footsteps of Dorothea Lange, who photographed stoic, suffering faces during the Depression, the Chinese-born artist traveled across recession-worn America, capturing a different sort of face.

Red-Cooked Meat and Table Manners: Decoding How to Cook and Eat in Chinese

By Phyllis Fong | November 7, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Buwei Yang Chao’s famed 1945 cookbook helped coined the phrase “stir-fry.” “Wrapling” and “rambling,” her words for the simple and ruffle-edged dumplings, were less successful.

Cobra Notes for Ban

By Bhanu Kapil | October 17, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop
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“I want a literature that is not made from literature.”

Ashok and Amrit Go to the Movies

By Ashok Kondabolu | October 8, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Stereogum editor Amrit Singh has a hang with Das Racist hypeman Ashok Kondabolu. Proper nouns mentioned: George Washington, Britney Spears, Jenny Slate (a.k.a. the “Marcel the Shell” girl), and C. Mohan (Bollywood’s most iconic designer).

A (2012) Midsummer History Lesson

By Negin Farsad | October 5, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

It’s the year 2352, and the Walrusoids are at it again, speculating over divorce, SB 1070, some tall Asian guy named Jeremy Lin, and movie theater masturbation.

The Occasional Writer: An Interview with Science Fiction Author Ted Chiang

By Vandana Singh | October 3, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Fellow sci-fi writer Vandana Singh quizzes the award-winning, short-fiction master on his axiomatic approaches, paradigm shifts, and whether he would ever own a digient.

EXCERPT: The Story of My Assassins

By Tarun Tejpal | September 27, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“Our Mordor was the same. Our Frankenstein was the same. Our Tinker Bell was the same. We didn’t have to imagine Davy Jones—a graphics company in Silicon Valley was manufacturing him for us. We all picked our visuals from the universal pool. The individual monster was dead.”

Rogue State: Jeff Biggers on the Arizonification of America

By Michelle Chen | September 20, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

In an interview about his new book, State Out of the Union, author Jeff Biggers examines Arizona, the so-called “meth lab of democracy,” and the rogue state’s cycles of repression and resistance.

From Laundromats to Radiolab: Jad Abumrad Peers into Thao Nguyen’s Old Soul

By Jad Abumrad | September 19, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“The first real song I wrote was a book report for Lord of the Flies.”

YA Fiction and Issues that Aren’t Fictitious: A Q&A with Adaptation Author Malinda Lo

By Phyllis Fong | September 18, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“I absolutely did not set out to write a lesbian Cinderella. It wasn’t the story I intended to tell, so it took me a while to come around to the idea of telling it.”

Catch Me Online: The Dead Do Not Improve’s Jay Caspian Kang

By Hua Hsu | September 14, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The journalist and debut fiction writer chats with fellow Grantland writer Hua Hsu about his new neo-noir novel, grading papers, and Duck Down videos.

Ashok and Anil Go to the Cafe

By Ashok Kondabolu | September 11, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Ashok Kondabolu of Das Racist interviews Anil Dash, the blogger and technologist, at Financier Patisserie, near Astor Place.

Excerpt: Qiu Miaojin’s Notes of a Crocodile

By Qiu Miaojin | September 5, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Qiu Miaojin—one of the first openly lesbian writers in ’90s post-martial-law Taiwan—committed suicide at the age of 26. What follows is an excerpt from her “survival manual” for a younger generation. With an introduction by translator Bonnie Huie.

The Ghosts of Omonia Square

By Ranbir Sidhu | August 29, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

In Athens, an historic square and neighborhood now home to porno theaters, sex stores, and “café” brothels, is alive with immigrants—until it isn’t.

Muslim Self-Portraits (and Accusations) at Heart Mountain

By Hana Maruyama | August 22, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

At the Japanese American internment camp site, an art exhibit featuring photographs of Muslims has been the subject of complaints.

Nonsense Made Sense: The Downside Up World of Stephen Chow

By La Frances Hui | August 16, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The veteran comedian, actor and director was the epitome of Hong Kong’s ’90s-era mo lei tau subculture.

What’s the best pitch you’ve ever gotten?

By Agony Agent | August 16, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Our mystery veteran agents answer your questions about the book industry.

Zen Fishing, or What You Catch Can Catch You, Too

By Luis H. Francia | August 14, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Poet and journalist Luis H. Francia journeys through Japan, bearing witness to the devastation wrought by the 2011 earthquake and tsunami—and to the creativity arising from these very areas.

London Olympics, 1948: Her Name Meant Double Victory

By Hana Maruyama | August 10, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Diver Vicki Manalo Draves won two gold medals in rations-enforced London. To celebrate, she ate horse.

Near To The Alien: Katie Kitamura on Gone To The Forest

By Hermione Hoby | August 7, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Kitamura chats with Hermione Hoby about her new novel, a “collage of colonialism.”

What I Have Learned About the World from Books, and What the World Could Stand to Learn from the Shooting at the Sikh Temple

By Matthew Salesses | August 7, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Matthew Salesses on the power of words and appearances.

Hello World: How Nike Sold Tiger Woods

By Hiram Perez | August 2, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

How did a multinational corporation like Nike appeal to diverse markets without violating the principle of colorblindness that became increasingly and insidiously sacrosanct in the U.S. in the 1990s? A deconstruction of two infamous Tiger Woods ads sheds some light.

Cindy Sherman Plays Wolf (To Nikki S. Lee’s Chameleon)

By Sylvia Kwon | August 1, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

How do you get from Cindy Sherman, to Nikki S. Lee, and back?

APPLY: Come Be an Intern at the AAWW!

By AAWW Staff | July 31, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Searching for something that you can’t encounter on a college walk? Apply to be a fall intern at the Asian American Writers’ Workshop.

Youth Fiction Undone: R. Zamora Linmark’s Debut

By Roopika Risam | July 30, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The Leche author’s first novel—set in Hawaii and replete with lush pop-cultural references—can be read as a postmodern YA gem.

Portrait of the Artist as an Activist | Ai Weiwei: Never Sorry

By Ryan Lee Wong | July 27, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

A new documentary about the famed Chinese artist and dissident focuses on his activism more than it does his art.

Honorable Mention: Tze-Ming Mok, “Pants, Too, Should Be Optional”

By Tze-Ming Mok | July 26, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“Only when the Imperial Wang—or as they say in English, “The Wang of Wangs,” is shoved directly in the face of the public, will the Emperor’s potency be fully apparent.”

Third Place: Laura Chu, “Clean or Cloudy, It’s All Relative”

By Laura Chu | July 26, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“Fry these days! Maybe he had been exposed to too many pesticides as an egg.”

Second Place: Alice Yen, “The Evolution of [Love] Letters”

By Alice Yen | July 26, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Various communications methods are being developed: email, SMS, etc. Do you think the letter is replaceable?

First Place: Mic Nguyen, “Supplemental Instructions”

By Mic Nguyen | July 26, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“Assume the fish are swimming in clean, pollution-free water. Assume any cloudiness to be a consequence of naturally occurring solvents or debris.”

WATCH: Junot Diaz and Min Jin Lee on Writer Origins

By Lali Foster | July 25, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“They say to write something new you’ve got to be lost.” An excerpted video conversation featuring the Pulitzer Prize winner and the author of Free Food for Millionaires.

Ashok and Sheng Go on the Kiddie Ride

By Ashok Kondabolu | July 19, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Part two of an epic conversation between Ashok Kondabolu of Das Racist and Comedy Central comedian Sheng Wang.

Tsai Ming-Liang’s Wayward Boundaries

By Jennifer Pan | July 18, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Can a movie that explicitly demonstrates the darkest grotesqueries of pornography actually function as a refusal to condemn it? Tsai Ming-Liang’s The Wayward Cloud hints at this possibility.

Here We Are Becoming Champs

By Melissa Chadburn | July 17, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“Pacquiao became the second man in boxing history to win world titles in six different weight divisions. There he was: our uncle, our Tito, our brother, our kuya.”

Mountain Brothers: Winning Voices

By Oliver Wang | July 16, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“Since their submission was purely auditory, no one at Sprite realized they were Asian American.”

Excerpt: Gun Dealers’ Daughter

By Gina Apostol | July 16, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“My father’s warehouse was close to the decayed parts of the harbor, which rambled on into the slums built by smugglers and sailors.”

Sea Salty: The Man and the Crab

By Harley Spiller | July 13, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Former Marine mess cook John Gun Pin knew how to handle a cleaver. Harley Spiller (a.k.a. Inspector Collector) remembers his old friend, and the last dish he prepared: cured crab, or ha cha.

Ashok and Sheng Take Cover

By Ashok Kondabolu | July 12, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

In the first installment of his interview column, “The Cornering,” Ashok Kondabolu of Das Racist chats it up with Comedy Central comedian Sheng Wang. They also traipse the streets of Chinatown. Look out for part deux of this interview next week.

Rewatching A Beijinger in New York

By Ying Li | July 12, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Ying Li talks to her novelist mother, Lin Chang, about the first Chinese-language TV show to be shot in the United States.

Chasing Down the #Ghandifoul

By Siddhartha Mitter | July 11, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

A new Twitter feed goes after those who commit the common crime of misspelling Mahatma Gandhi’s last name.

Bands of Brothers

By Oliver Wang | July 2, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Over the course of the ’90s, Filipino American scratch crews transformed the realm of hip-hop DJing.

Timothy McVeigh and our “Buried History”

By Manan Ahmed | June 27, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

On the domestic terror of the 1990s, and avoiding cultural amnesia.

Xu Xi is my name.

By Ken Chen | June 27, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The transnational writer dishes about Law and Order, her favorite drinks, and less-than-romantic writing habits.

Party with DREAMer Julio Salgado at our Launch Celebration

By AAWW Staff | June 27, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

A round-up of articles, interviews and videos featuring Salgado, who was recently among the first undocumented immigrants to be featured on the cover of TIME magazine. The artist and activist will be screenprinting at AAWW’s launch party tonight.

Danny Boyle’s Eighty-Six Flavors

By Siddhartha Mitter | June 25, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The leaked playlist for the London Olympics opening ceremony is almost absurdly eclectic, and includes the bhangra track, “Nachna Onda Nei.”

Contest: Hao Nao, Gaokao?

By AAWW Staff | June 22, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Compared to China’s national university entrance exam, the gaokao (lit., “test you must ace or work as a menial laborer for the rest of your life”), the SATs are a stroll in the park.

Rescripting Armageddon in Tropic of Orange

By Warren Liu | June 19, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Karen Tei Yamashita’s novel of a dystopic ’90s L.A. tangles with both disasters and distractions.

Tailor-Made: Hollywood Tries to Suit China

By Shining Li and Katherine Zhang | June 19, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

But the media bungles it up with an overly simplistic “Red China” narrative.

The Writing on the Shirt: Nirvana and the Politics of Selling Out

By Hua Hsu | June 19, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

A Grantland writer and Nirvana fan ponders the quintessential ’90s question.

How soon can I write my memoir?

By Agony Agent | June 18, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The inaugural installment of our publishing advice column. Send our Agony Agents your most pressing book industry questions!

With Grain: A Q&A with Apichatpong Weerasethakul

By Katie Kitamura | June 15, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The acclaimed Thai filmmaker sits down with novelist Katie Kitamura for a conversation about narrative vs. storytelling, black magic, and migrant populations.

Magic Mediation: Wu-Tang’s Kung Fu Zeal

By Sophia Chang | June 13, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

An up-close and personal take on the hip-hop group’s love of kung fu.

Nick Carter: Killmaster, Yogi, Lover.

By Anne Ishii | June 13, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Spy novels as Asian kitsch.

Stay Sassy

By Jamia Wilson | June 12, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

A love letter to the magazine that defined a generation.

Class of 1997

By Oliver Wang | June 12, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

It was a banner year for Asian American narrative films.

Tania James doesn’t want to read your mind.

By Ken Chen | June 11, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The Aerogrammes author chats about her preferred superpower and her love of Norton Anthologies.

History Lessons, Walrusoid Style

By Negin Farsad | June 11, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

In the year 2352, they scratch their heads over Instagram, Mitt Romney, Kony, and Siri.

WATCH: Celebrating the Lifetime Achievements of Jessica Hagedorn at PageTurner 2011

By Jessica Wang | June 9, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Ma-Yi Theater Company pays tribute to Jessica Hagedorn with a special performance.

Don Lee on how to smooth out your jibes. A Q&A.

By Ken Chen | June 8, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The author of The Collective chats with AAWW executive director Ken Chen about windsurfing, his writing chair, and the best way to eat eggs.

Born in the U.S.A.: Cornershop’s “Brimful of Asha”

By Manan Desai | June 7, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The British desi band’s kitschy, three-chord hit appeared on episodes of Friends and in a Gap commercial.

Asian Chic

By Thuy Linh Tu | June 6, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The ‘90s saw Western designers outsourcing not just manufacturing, but inspiration, to Asia.

“Where is your ‘White literature’ section?”

By Amitava Kumar | June 4, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Author, professor, and provocateur Amitava Kumar has a very specific question for New York City book clerks.

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