Articles in the Everything Category
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Keeping Tabs: Imagining Survival

By AAWW | August 15, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Anelise Chen’s latest mollusk column, the painful search for Asian American identity, “anti-blah” writing and more are featured in this week’s link roundup.

Document

By Bao Phi | August 15, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

In all the books I love, the hero doesn’t strike first. But then again, none of the heroes look like me.

Tell the Truth Sooner: An Interview with Abeer Hoque

By Piyali Bhattacharya | August 10, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The writer talks about her new memoir, Olive Witch, subverting her identity, and the tenuous link between memory and writing.

AAWW TV: Family vs. Immigration

By AAWW | August 10, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Novelist Shanthi Sekaran speaks with Race Forward’s Rinku Sen and Kavita Das about how our immigration system threatens families of color

ASEAN at 50: Poems from Across Southeast Asia

By The Transpacific Literary Project | August 7, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Half a century on, what does it mean to be part of ASEAN?

AAWW TV: Celebrating Nick Joaquin

By AAWW | August 3, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Writers Gina Apostol, Ninotchka Rosca, Alex Gilvarry and Melissa R. Sipin joined us for a celebration of legendary Filipino writer Nick Joaquin

Azalea Azalea

By Aria Aber | August 1, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

For eleven / years I lied about where I’m from, / ashamed by the music of endings, // that deep hollow bell. How much of my yearly / tax is spent to bomb the dirt / that birthed me?, is a question // I never wanted to consider.

Keeping Tabs: Critical Memory, Radical Futurity

By AAWW | July 28, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

On data, food, and criticality under capitalism and the State.

Keeping Tabs: Chasing Knowledge and Future Liberation

By AAWW | July 21, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Reads that encourage us to resist complacency and keep searching for new ways of thinking and being in the world–all in the name of self-determination.

Ashok and Miho Get Optimistic

By Ashok Kondabolu | July 21, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Ashok speaks to Miho Hatori of Cibo Matto about her new creative endeavors, Tokyo versus New York, and what gets lost in translation.

AAWW TV: White People & Asian Dropouts with Lisa Ko, Jade Sharma, Ed Lin

By AAWW | July 20, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Lisa Ko reads from her debut novel; Ed Lin and Jade Sharma read their stories of Asians who don’t fit the model minority stereotype.

Not Dead

By Nina Sharma | July 20, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

What the parallels between the violent murders of The Walking Dead’s Glenn Rhee and Vincent Chin tell us about being Asian in America.

Keeping Tabs: Liminal Presents and Navigations

By AAWW | July 14, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

On building bridges in liminal spaces, and carving new pathways through the unknown.

No Radio

By Sokunthary Svay | July 11, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘Children are playing soldier. / Fetuses ripped from wombs dangle / in nearby trees. Yet he opened his mouth / and a flood of love melodies poured out.’

Keeping Tabs: Strange Places and Safe Havens

By AAWW | July 7, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

On accountability – as readers, writers, and members of society.

AAWW TV: Interactive Reading with Thi Bui

By AAWW | July 6, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Watch Thi Bui read an excerpt from her illustrated memoir The Best We Can Do with the help of some audience members.

it will be too late when i learn the meaning of americanah

By Taeyin ChoGlueck | June 27, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

pink spam injected into the bloodstream / won’t make one minnesotan, / the difference of an exporter and importer, / colonizer and the colonized with a nine digit ssn

On Vincent Chin and the Kind of Men You Send to Jail

By Mark Tseng-Putterman | June 23, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Thirty five years ago, Asian America’s faith in the justice system was shaken. Have we forgotten the lesson?

June Bookmarks: 8 Books by Asian Diasporic Writers to Read this Month

By Yasmin Majeed | June 21, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

This month in Asian diasporic lit brings new queer desi stories, “badass letters to comicdom,” and love songs from down and out Asian American country music stars.

Trying To Recognize People Like Me

By Rowan Hisayo Buchanan | June 16, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Writers Rowan Hisayo Buchanan, Violet Kupersmith, and T Kira Madden speak to each other about mixed-race identities in life and literature

AAWW TV: Ode to DJ Khaled

By AAWW | June 15, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop
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Marwa Helal reads two poems at the Workshop, including her paen to the Palestinian American rapper DJ Khaled.

Keeping Tabs: Invisibilization

By AAWW | June 13, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

On mollusks, writing craft, and writing against whiteness.

On Lovers and Closeness: Two Poems by Joseph Han

By Joseph Han | June 13, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Every spring, a deer must shed antlers used for fighting and each bone branch grows back with the thought of my partner’s return this season, and yet.

Teaching Hope, Teaching Rage: An Interview with Mike Copperman

By Danielle Seid | June 13, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The writer and teacher speaks on navigating Mississippi’s racial politics and his experience in public education as “forged in violence.”

Ghosts in the War Machine: Jane Wong’s Overpour

By Sally Wen Mao | June 6, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The poet talks about her debut collection, sharing silenced histories in her writing, and being a “wild girl poet.”

Silence and Breath: Kaveh Akbar and Kazim Ali

By Kaveh Akbar and Kazim Ali | June 2, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The two poets talk about their literary family trees, poetry as a protective force, and the changing landscape for Muslim American writers.

Being Brave: An Excerpt from Thi Bui’s The Best We Could Do

By Thi Bui | June 1, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘In my sleep, I dreamt of how terrible it would be to not find my way home.’

where are we headed

By Jess Rizkallah | May 30, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

but this is boring. let’s talk / about something else. people are only lines / written with water it’s not that serious. i just want to drink / my coffee. i just want to think about roses i misheard / the words as a laugh, beautiful like a song of roses

May Bookmarks: 13 Asian American Books Out This Month

By Yasmin Majeed | May 25, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

May brings in queer Taiwanese cult classics, erotic manga and the fictional saga of a Palestinian family through the years.

宇多田 ヒカル and the Huntsman: Poems by Kazumi Chin

By Kazumi Chin | May 23, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘This drought of silence / that does not feed me. I mean, I refuse / to hold his vanity. And demand to know / myself better. Cull his soul but only / for memory, carve a history / for myself in which my reflection / alone can be seen.’

Patty Yumi Cottrell: Haunted and Obsessed

By Brandon Shimoda | May 18, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The author of Sorry to Disrupt the Peace reflects on writing out of desperation, Fiona Apple, and the novel as a ghostly space.

Writing Toward Home

By Renee Macalino Rutledge | May 10, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Before I could go back to the Philippines in real life, I did so on paper, through my first novel.

Dear Dogwood Bloomed

By Michelle Lin | May 9, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

I meant / to just take a photo of you. Forgive // my trespasses, my negatives, / but remember them. My ghosts // were asked to lay in their bed, / and so said: I am not like them // I am not. This is the blood I’ll leave / behind on bark to bark.

Memory of Figment a Merely: Four Poems by Zaina Alsous

By Zaina Alsous | May 2, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

At this point I will disobey and say / you are free to go if you choose. Choice is a complicated part of describing / Palestinian heroes or terrorists.

How to Become Invisible: An Interview with Stephanie Han

By Gail Vida Hamburg | April 26, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The award-winning writer talks about her new acclaimed short story collection, the anxiety of exile, and figuring out which narrative you belong to.

In a Roman Story

By Mia Kang | April 25, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Oh Mars, you mistook me / for someone / I briefly was. / Girl alight / with impending loss, / vessel for bearing / out an arch / -itectural illusion. A wall / isn’t truly built / to exclude, but to instate / something worth defending.

Ashok and Vijay Squeeze Blood from a Drum Machine

By Ashok Kondabolu | April 20, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Ashok Kondabolu speaks to Vijay Iyer about an alternate history of jazz, opening institutional spaces, and the resistance and defiance within music.

Salome Dances the Seven Veils, Asks for the Head of a Baptist in Return

By Nina Li Coomes | April 18, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘No words of a Savior are news to a Woman. / No words of a resurrection sound gospel[-enough] / when you are both the Crucifixion and the Crowd.’

Our War Is in the Mind

By Sokunthary Svay | April 18, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Three generations of Cambodian women in my family wrestle with the inherited trauma of the Khmer Rouge

Sisters

By Do Jae Kim | April 14, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Scotch-taped at the mirrors’ edges were photographs of birthdays, family vacations, running in the rain. Their edges had curled from sixteen years of steam from hot showers and baths.

Decomposition Study

By Tom Phan | April 11, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘Skin molted like a lazy adder/while sinew pooled like glue.//Bone fractured next/like desert rose glass/then melted too.’

April Bookmarks

By Yasmin Majeed | April 11, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

April’s releases by Asian diasporic writers include new works from Samrat Upadhyay, Durga Chew-Bose, and Mai Der Vang.

(UN)Covered: Seeing Beyond the Surface

By Michelle Chen | April 6, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

A local art exhibit turns a feminist gaze on Muslim and Sikh women’s head coverings.

Keeping Tabs: Alternate Histories

By AAWW Staff | April 4, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

A day without a hate crime, Asian-American activism in 1970s Los Angeles, worlds made possible by the NEA

The Dirt Will Wash Us Clean: Poems by Hari Alluri

By Hari Alluri | April 4, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘We do not want to hover like a line of fog, a river’s shadow, but slower: shadows in conversation, gentle only when we don’t bother expecting to be heard.’

Lost In Time: An Interview with Christine Hyung-Oak Lee

By Randa Jarrar | March 27, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Christine Hyung-Oak Lee talks about her new memoir, the restorative power of writing, the doubling that haunts her life, and why Slaughterhouse-Five is a permanent part of her mind.

March Bookmarks

By Yasmin Majeed | March 24, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

From Hari Alluri’s electrifying poetry to Patty Yumi Cottrell’s dark absurdism, March is a month filled with exciting new releases from Asian diasporic writers.

Immigration in A

By Kristin Chang | March 23, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘When I held him in my palm, I learned to love what made me. From time to time, I think about my father, his country, clean hands. I like to think of his hands as clean. I like to think I owe nothing to his body.’

Life in the Revolution: A Family History Under Marcos

By Susan F. Quimpo | March 16, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The newspapers were quick to christen the members of the underground movement with new names: subversives, communist insurgents, terrorists, guerrillas, rebels. Yet in my mind, they were simply family.

I Wake Up in New York to an Explosion in Lahore and Carry On With My Day As If Nothing Happened

By Momina Mela | March 14, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘A man kisses a pigeon and another kisses a dog and / both times I look away to gather the spikes of trees into a / dripping faucet.’

Keeping Tabs: Outsider Experiences

By | March 10, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Language boundaries and the quest for diversity, empowerment, and the need for Feminism and International Women’s Day

Raichō Hiratsuka: In the Beginning, Woman Was the Sun

By Rowan Hisayo Buchanan | March 8, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Rowan Hisayo Buchanan illustrates the life of Japanese feminist writer Raichō Hiratsuka and her magazine dedicated to empowering women

Keeping Tabs: In Sickness and in Health

By AAWW | March 3, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Carving a subversive current in the cinematic status quo, the deep roots of Islamophobia in America, and the political power of laughter.

When You Turn Into Silence: Three Poems By E.J. Koh

By E. J. Koh | February 28, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The sun sieves through the canopy— / rivers are relenting. My soul seats itself // for the first time. Where it is quiet, it becomes cold. / There is nothing I must do but die— // what joy to let go of all things—what ease to give up.

To Forget the World, Only to Discover the World: A Conversation with Krys Lee

By Hannah Michell | February 27, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The author of How I Became a North Korean speaks about the power of fiction to give clarity to the world.

Keeping Tabs: Alien(ation)

By AAWW's | February 24, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Poetry mixtapes, music for aliens, Asian American science fiction and more.

Moustafa Bayoumi on Politics and Protest in the Trump Era

By Michelle Chen | February 23, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

An interview with the Muslim American writer and activist about how Trump has unintentionally made America great

Magic / Dawn: Two Poems by Sahar Romani

By Sahar Romani | February 21, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘First memory of English: my father orders spaghetti from a waitress. / Foreign flowers blossom in his mouth and I’m spellbound in Urdu. // On Friday afternoons, cars spill across a bleached suburb. / Not far from the mosque, look! Crooked lines of devout Urdu.’

Uncertified

By Mehrnoosh Torbatnejad | February 14, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘did I ever tell the teacher / we invented a new language that a pair of six year olds spoke fluent / appeasement she pointed to the globe told me to tell him / this is the world and that is America’

Keeping Tabs: Guide to Infinity

By Yasmin Majeed | February 8, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Representing friendship between women of color, making your mom’s stir-fried tomato and eggs recipe, finding strength in the face of relentless fear, and more.

800 Million Hands: Looking Back at a Lost Classic of Asian American Literature

By Floyd Cheung | February 8, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Chinese American writer H.T. Tsiang’s final novel is a Marxist, feminist, pro-immigrant satire of the American Dream. It was published 80 years ago.

We Set Our Tables

By Krystal A. Sital | February 7, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘Cracking the spine, we eat // With fingers mixing and mashing, / ladling for one another, / Karaili, pommecythe, cur-he, / spooning and sliding into our mouths, / Wiping the leaf green.’

Keeping Tabs: An American Story

By Yasmin Majeed | February 3, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Muslim Ban CliffsNotes, honoring the late, great Bharati Mukherjee, why Fred Korematsu’s story still matters today, and more.

Seeing a Lover: Four Poems by Hasan Sijzi of Delhi

By Hasan Sijzi of Delhi | January 31, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘My wishes are fulfilled with less searching. / My lover rises with a little waiting. / His fresh moustache conquers the cosmos. / Colored by evening, his mole deceives fate.’

Keeping Tabs: Snap Shots

By Yasmin Majeed | January 27, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Barry Jenkins on Wong Kar-wai, Monica Youn on historical instability, Sara Ahmed on white feminism, and more.

What Solidarity Looks Like After the Women’s March

By Aber Kawas | January 27, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Palestinian American community organizer Aber Kawas reflects on #IMarchWithLinda and putting the spotlight on those who are less visible

“Nautical Shrouds”

By Vi Khi Nao | January 24, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘I roam. Sometimes in solitude; sometimes in a crowd. But unlike a dog, I do not die a little each day, subdued to the loyalty of my master. I die all at once if it must be.’

Keeping Tabs: Times Like These

By Yasmin Majeed | January 20, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Inauguration preparation, deconstructing “Asian America,” cleaning up the mess together, and anti-fascist poetry.

Obama in Kenya: Geographies of Diaspora in Four Movements

By Megan Fernandes | January 18, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘When we bury someone, cremate them, mark their grave, thousands of miles from their place of birth, we are in some ways promising that we will return to them and that we will return them.’

“mothers and fathers”

By Irene Hsu | January 17, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘how to write a thank you letter / how to write a sorry letter. how to write / a letter saying please i’d love / my money back, or haven’t i given / you enough? how to write i love / you i love / you and isn’t that / enough?’

Ashok and Andrew Get Empirical

By Ashok Kondabolu | January 13, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Ashok talks to artist Andrew Kuo about the history of painting, making his own Wu-Tang shirts, and Linsanity

When Nature Inhabits a Body: Two Poems by Shireen Madon

By Shireen Madon | January 10, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘The pain entered / me the way the moon / disarms the daya slick blade. / I offered myself as water, / studied its errancy. / What a good citizen, / I thought.’

The Pentagram Discovery by W. Todd Kaneko

By W. Todd Kaneko | January 3, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘If you spark a flame and turn / it upside down, / you will find it is still / a flame.’

Trumpistan: A Writer and His Notebook After the Election

By Amitava Kumar | December 30, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

From two World Wars and Partition to 9/11 and India’s Modi, the search for stories that help find our way out of the dark

Looking Out the Window Like Malcolm

By Nina Sharma | December 21, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘I was still getting used to the place—how quiet the suburbs are, how calculated in their quietude.’

Keeping Tabs: Shelter

By AAWW | December 16, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Equipment for frigid temperatures, self-protection in the digital form, tools for resistance, and more.

Sunday Elegy by Katy Kim

By Katy Kim | December 13, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

There are no refractions today / by the pepper flakes— in the glass. // The snails slept by the snap pea hooks / and cradles— I salted them. // Sometimes I drank / from a vapored gas— / I made ellipses with my glass.

Funny Immigrant Novels: An Interview with Jade Chang

By Wendy Lee | December 12, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Author Jade Chang talks about her new novel ‘The Wangs vs. the World,’ subverting righteous immigrant stories, and asshole as an endearing term.

Keeping Tabs: Parking

By AAWW | December 9, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

More resources for safeguarding, taking precaution, approaching danger, and more.

Funeral by the Arcade

By Leland Cheuk | December 9, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

In video games, the fear of the sudden propels you forward. Not so in life.

Ashok and Hasan Toss Out the Script

By Ashok Kondabolu | December 7, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘The Daily Show’ correspondent Hasan Minhaj talks to Ashok Kondabolu about his new one-man show, ‘Homecoming King,’ running away from John Kasich, and the role of comedians in the age of Trump.

Keeping Tabs: Junction

By AAWW | December 2, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Another set of resources for transformation, joining resistance movements, building other worlds, and more.

Moment of Explosion: On Solmaz Sharif’s ‘Look’

By Yasmin Majeed | November 30, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Dissecting the violence of state, warfare, and language

[conflict/occupation] by George Abraham

By George Abraham | November 29, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘i contour my face with sand & it is war paint on the wrong body. i puncture my nostril with steel & that is a war crime on the wrong body.’

American Tourist by Jessica Yuan

By Jessica Yuan | November 22, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘My father likes silence and the past. // He votes for losing candidates (he is so unwilling to love charismatic men.) / He believes in the things we are given, like decency.’

Keeping Tabs: Direction

By AAWW | November 18, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Additional resources for community protection, healing, security, action, and more.

Making and Unmaking the Asian American Movement

By Michelle Chen | November 17, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Karen Ishizuka’s ‘Serve the People’ tells the story of a radical period in Asian American activism, and compels us to ask, where does that lead us now?

AAWW TV: Microagressions (& Other Poems)

By AAWW | November 17, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Poets Claudia Rankine and Hoa Nguyen speak with Rigoberto Gonzalez about the urgent need for poetry as a force for political change.

The Games: Two Poems by Janice Sapigao

By Janice Lobo Sapigao | November 15, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘these games draw lines / between crowds / i am one of many / who wonder, / how come the silicon valley / squats on san josé?’

Keeping Tabs: Signal

By AAWW | November 11, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Resources for support, safety, care, resistance, and more.

No Comfort in Shade: Three Poems by Chris Santiago

By Chris Santiago | November 8, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

To constellate; archipelago. // Portmanteau & neologize. // To fix a golden / foil across the mouth— // a burial mask / to keep the evil out. // To raise walled cities / stone & green with rain.

Lessons of Our Recent Past

By Julie Shiroishi | November 7, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

As Election Day approaches, remembering the story of my parents’ immigrant survival, from Japanese internment to community activism, proves more important than ever.

Keeping Tabs: Watershed

By AAWW | November 4, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Memories between oceans, migrations across seas, bodies of water, trout on land, and more.

AMPLIFY(HER): Raising the Counter-Narrative

By AMPLIFY(HER) | November 4, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

From comfort food to college applications, this zine showcases the stories of undocumented women from the Asian Diaspora

AAWW TV: Breaking into Speculative Fiction

By AAWW | November 3, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Novelists Malka Older and Jennifer Marie Brissett discuss the ins and outs of writing speculative fiction

Vanessa Hua: When Deceit is a Strategy for Survival

By Marianne Villanueva | November 3, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The author of ‘Deceit and Other Possibilities’ on mischievous writing, how journalism feeds fiction, and getting to that “good place” in a short story

All Your Original Meanings: Two Poems by Soleil David

By Soleil David | November 1, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘Here is language, say / it is one you know. Hyphenate / when you can. Steal inquiries, / steel for confusion. Be content / in the discontent of the hyphenation.’

Keeping Tabs: Flight Patterns

By AAWW | October 28, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Mapping displacement, resisting settler colonialism, assembling planes, flying south for the winter, and more.

Mr. Nadaraja’s Boy

By Dinesh McCoy | October 28, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Did she look up, see the lettering on his nametag, N-A-D-A-R-A-J-A, and think to herself, “A Tamil I don’t know? In Findlay, Ohio?”

AAWW TV: Process Talk I

By AAWW | October 27, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Writers Jaswinder Bolina, Ching-In Chen, Bich Minh Nguyen and Timothy Yu reflect on their writing processes

The Unreliable Truth

By Larissa Pham | October 27, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Why I flirted with the truth when writing my novel in the first person

A River Rolls On

By Michelle Chen | October 27, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

When Pearl River Mart closed earlier this year, it signaled long-expressed concerns over gentrification and rising rent prices in Manhattan’s Chinatown. What will its reincarnation bring?

Family Garden: Two Poems by Nghiem Tran

By Nghiem Tran | October 25, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘A body on all fours, you / prefer crawling over standing, / your face permanently tilted / down, your eyes only seeing / the ground. How beautiful / the view is.’

Keeping Tabs: Seismic Shift

By AAWW | October 21, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Resisting co-opting and assimilation with language, un-fixing meaning, connecting natural disasters, and more.

Sonya Chung: Intimacy Across Racial Lines

By Monica Lewis | October 21, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The author of ‘The Loved Ones’ on what we have a right to expect from novels, love beyond blood family, and moving through anxiety and envy as writer

Ashok and Jeff Find Out Who’s Fakin’ The Funk

By Ashok Kondabolu | October 19, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Writer and activist Jeff Chang talks about code switching, his new book ‘We Gon’ Be Alright,’ Asian American spectator status, and President Obama’s favorite comic book store in Honolulu.

Orphan: The Plural Form by Sun Yung Shin

By Sun Yung Shin | October 18, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘A family as triangle. Drifting lines. This [mother- father-child] triangle will never be reassembled.’

Keeping Tabs: Familiar Form

By AAWW | October 14, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

A return to ghosts, negotiating art and music, borders and bars, political aesthetics, and more.

The Great Abramovich

By George Gao | October 14, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘I glanced curiously at the stranger. He looked old and frail. The sky outside the window seemed darker with his figure in profile. Though he was sitting next to us, he appeared to be somewhere else entirely.’

A Writer Acts Out

By Ed Lin | October 12, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Out of a full-time job and wondering if his first book would ever hit the shelves, Ed Lin briefly ventured out before the camera

Keeping Tabs: Throw-away

By AAWW | October 7, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Wading through piles of litter, trying to reclaim a car, object relations, lobsters, and more.

Sonneting: Two Poems by Sreshtha Sen

By Sreshtha Sen | October 4, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘Night, she tries to define herself but forgets / her skin is already inked into a script.’

Keeping Tabs: Prisms

By AAWW | September 30, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Writing magic and mermaids, negotiating boundaries and borders, combatting immigrant detention, living in disaster, and more.

Rewriting the Singapore Story

By Wei-Ling Woo | September 28, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Sonny Liew’s The Art of Charlie Chan Hock Chye questions Singapore’s accepted national narratives.

Hirato Renkichi and Hagiwara Kyojiro: 1920s Japanese Avant-Garde Poets

By Hirato Renkichi and Hagiwara Kyojiro | September 27, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘Dark, dark, too dark a dark everywhere / Lovers drooping their necks / Dark as though picking up that darkness / And, again, inside that darkness / There are wolves and dogs on the prowl’

Mg Roberts: “Displacement Is a Moment of Translation”

By Maw Shein Win | September 26, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

An interview with Bay Area poet, teacher, and artist Mg Roberts on interpreting graffiti, fragmented immigrant narratives, and how everyday is an opportunity to revise

Keeping Tabs: Gridded Space

By AAWW | September 23, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Urban university politics, labor strikes, skateboard tricks, probably-canned broth, and more.

Self-Portrait as GPS

By Steven Chung | September 20, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

How the steering wheel / points nowhere except towards itself. / And such is the spinning of the mind: / everywhere. When we drove into new / cities it was only a different shape of haze.

Keeping Tabs: Covering Ground

By AAWW | September 16, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Growing into community action, genealogy, dystopia, and more.

Tickets to Disneyland

By Fan Wu | September 16, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘Bonita, that engineer from Spain who always worked late, must have gone home already. Yong looked down at his ironed shirt and felt disappointed—if he had done the third floor half an hour earlier he might have seen her.’

Ashok and Ayesha Take a Break from the American Dream

By Ashok Kondabolu | September 16, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Writer Ayesha Siddiqi talks to Ashok Kondabolu about growing anti-Muslim anxieties, her new job at Viceland and what keeps people up at night.

Still Dirty: Two Poems by David Lau

By David Lau | September 13, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘No motions./A tonic in page display tufts,/call me switch-foot, a check away from homeless./You get there. Intentional.’

Peter Ho Davies: Occupying the Space Between

By Lillian Li | September 12, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The author of The Fortunes talks about immigrant survival, our multiple selves, and who tells and receives the Chinese-American story

The Last Time I Saw Her: Poems by Mari L’Esperance

By Mari L'Esperance | September 6, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘Grief is deep green and carries a sharp scent./ Memory and rain are like nothing that keeps./ She disappeared in the season of roubai.’

Liked by Few, Hated by Most, Feared by All

By Vt Hung | September 2, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

I see my forebears, warriors in retirement, laboring in endless fields, bustling markets, and desolate seas. One by one they all stop, turn to me, and say: “If you have good hands, anything can happen.”

Growing Up in the 626

By Katie Salisbury | August 31, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Coming to terms with my mixed-race heritage as a kid in Southern California’s largest Asian enclave

Keeping Tabs: Retraced Steps

By AAWW | August 27, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Remembering family genealogies, the Asian American Movement, solidarity lines, and organizing for liberation.

Ashok and Riz the Day Of

By Ashok Kondabolu | August 25, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘The Night Of’ star Riz Ahmed talks to Ashok Kondabolu about cricket jerseys, patriotism, acting while brown, and race in the UK.

Hong Gildong: Classic Korean Fiction’s Number One Hero

By Minsoo Kang | August 23, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The frustrations and aspirations of the most famous outlaw from Korean pre-modern literature echo a story of modern Korea.

Why I Write in English

By Yang Huang | August 22, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘Wanting privacy in a police state was sheer stupidity’—to tell the stories of her family in China without the threat of censorship, Yang Huang had to look beyond Mandarin.

Keeping Tabs: Sport in Translation

By AAWW | August 20, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Lost memories of India’s Olympic team, transversal writing, translation and multilingualism, the necropastoral, vampires, and more.

An Artificial Organ

By Sarah Wang | August 19, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘What else was contained within the pages? What had come before the tofu boxes and dusty scrolls, the grumpy old man who spent his last two decades in America cloistered in my uncle’s back house?’

When the Chant Comes: Two Poems by Kay Ulanday Barrett

By Kay Ulanday Barrett | August 16, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘After midnight you assemble your limbs back to / their rightful place as you rid the pressure formed / by all day heat and no privacy.’

None of the Furniture Fits: Two Poems by Sunu Chandy

By Sunu P. Chandy | August 9, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘I lifted / an arm, to signify the range / of human voice. Somewhere in the week, / a detour from grief.’

Pacita

By Melissa R. Sipin | August 5, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘I am, I want to be, the rain, I want to be the ocean, just so I could say back to her: I am home now.’

But Who Is Listening Now?

By Nancy Jooyoun Kim | August 3, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

What the painful process of learning Korean, the language spoken by those who love me, has taught me about facing rejection as a writer

Letters to Mao: Two Poems by Jennifer S. Cheng

By Jennifer S. Cheng | August 2, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘How to measure my body home, which is to say, how many names can you give to an immigrant’s geography? Delta Court, Tai Tam, Outer Sunset; finally, a dream to reach the edge of the sea.’

How to Fly While Arab

By Randa Jarrar | July 27, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

A guide to help you get from here to there while Arab — from speaking Arabic to passing the salt

Pei Pei Wept by Lo Mei Wa

By Lo Mei Wa | July 26, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘That day, I came of age / And became a child.’

The Misadventures of Asian Americans

By Leland Cheuk | July 20, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Leland Cheuk and YiShun Lai discuss their debut novels, dysfunctional families, and writing the Asian American antihero

Poetry From the Schoolyard: A-Z American Born Chinese

By Sophia Huynh | July 19, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘I remember when I first learned my ABCs. A is for apple, B is for bird, and C is for cat, but further experience taught me, that ABC means American Born Chinese.’

Chris Jackson Accepts AAWW’s Editorial Achievement Award

By Chris Jackson | July 19, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

To get free, to tell the truth, sometimes requires new language that might not fit through that narrow channel of the dominant culture.

The Day: Poetry by Barbara Jane Reyes

By Barbara Jane Reyes | July 12, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘Sometimes you are damaged. You think poetry will repair you. You think poetry should repair you. You shake your fist at it when it doesn’t. You walk hand-in-hand with your damage, into the world. You do not speak. You are surprised when people register you are there.’

Letting the Dogs Out: Two Poems by Carlina Duan

By Carlina Duan | July 5, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘there was / my mother packaging miàn tiáo by the sink. / breath in the morning. breath in the afternoon. / the way history comes back to haunt me with / a plump fist. the way my mouth, a cave, opened / and closed.’

Hong Kong vs. Goliath

By Elaine Yu and Jeffrey Wasserstrom | July 2, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

With Canto-pop star Denise Ho and bookseller-turned-whistleblower Lam Wing-Kee, Hong Kong’s pro-democracy movement is putting the old tactic of boycotts to new use

Blue Skies

By Sobia Khan | July 1, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘That first day in America, she didn’t know the difference between police officers and immigration officers, or between waiting rooms and holding cells.’

The Fiction of Our Experiences: An Interview with Mia Alvar

By Melissa Sipin | June 30, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘Imagination can make things more real than they would be if they were just reported from real life’—the author of In the Country speaks on writing stories of south-south migration and when not to be faithful to a map.

A Tongue I Can Use: Two Poems by Hayun Cho

By Hayun Cho | June 28, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘You hold the knife, you drink the sorrows. / You burn your hands making tea. / When something hurts, / You no longer feel rage. / You wipe up the mess. / Outside, dusk is the color of Violet and ash.’

AAWW TV: Archive Seance with M. NourbeSe Philip and Phinder Dulai

By | June 23, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

From the slave ship Zong to the Japanese steamship Komagata Maru, two experimental poets draw on legal papers and ship records as they raise spirits from the sea

The Vanishing Point: Writers Speak to Kim Hyesoon’s Poetry in Translation

By Joyelle McSweeney and Johannes Göransson | June 23, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“It seems that reading Kim Hyesoon in English and from the United States entails a radical re-positioning of one’s reading perspective, from imperial center to the vanishing point.”

Nostalgia Is Your Sibling: Two Poems by Michelle Peñaloza

By Michelle Peñaloza | June 21, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘I wanted to be the last of my people, / a girl without mother, father, sister, brother— / a girl belonging to no one, / my only belongings a cormorant skirt / and a cage of tiny birds.’

Reunion

By Denis Wong | June 17, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘Danny’s hands dropped to his knees as he gasped. He felt something…a fist pressed against his face. I’m being punched, he thought as he fell. This is me being punched. It was a familiar feeling. Almost nostalgic.’

AAWW TV: Poetry & Politics

By AAWW | June 16, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Poets Monica Sok, Aimee Suzara, and David Mura explore their political landscapes through poems on the Khmer Rouge, the 1904 St. Louis World’s Fair, family, and antiblackness.

Pitch and Frequency by Sun Yung Shin

By Sun Yung Shin | June 14, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

My shadow turned to rust / …dust at the first strong wind / … the lungs of others / …hard to breathe / …to follow me / No one to lick out your lungs? / – sweep out the curious orange flakes?

Ventricles Embrace: Three Poems by Jen Hyde

By Jen Hyde | June 7, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘I am looking at pictures on a very large / chair in a room with white / walls my mother wipes daily. / Her shoulder is a shelter on which I arrange / rock formations to resemble skin burdens.’

China in the American Imagination: A Survey of Ephemera

By Hua Hsu | June 7, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

From Pearl Buck’s “The Good Earth” to the FBI files of HT Tsiang, a journey into the archives with Hua Hsu

All This Paper

By Joseph Han | June 3, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘The signs were like a collective raft, keeping them afloat as they waited on responses to their calls of distress.’

Why I Will Never Celebrate Indian Arrival Day

By Rajiv Mohabir | June 2, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Indentured labor in the Caribbean marked the beginning of disease, dependencies, prejudices, and ills that continue to plague Indo-Caribbean communities

By the River: Two Poems by Bing Li

By Bing Li | May 31, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop
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‘I told, my dear, I was living living living in the river. / I told, her then, I was dying dying dying not to shiver.’

Horror Story

By Rachel Rostad | May 24, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘In my favorite fiction about us, I would see you and some bell within me would toll—the way an elephant will walk over the bones of its own kind, know it instantly, and fall down and mourn. Instead, I looked away. What struck me was not like lightning or love, and so I wept.’

What Makes Pussy So Problematic?

By Rokudenashiko | May 18, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The story behind Japanese artist Rokudenashiko’s arrest for her vagina-inspired sculptures

Lavender Town: Three Poems by Sally Wen Mao

By Sally Wen Mao | May 17, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘When you climb the stairway, / don’t shield your eyes / from the pixels, 30 hertz heat— / don’t shield your awe / from the ghosts of pretty prey’

Kate Gavino’s ABCs of Being an Asian American Writer

By Kate Gavino | May 13, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

From Ann M. Martin’s Claudia Kishi to intersectionality, SPAM, and The Woman Warrior

The Next Bruce Lee and Other Poems by Kien Lam

By Kien Lam | May 10, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘I’ve heard the way some people breathe / at night and it made me want / to close their mouths. I think / inside of all of us lies / an animal trying its best to escape.’

Blank, White Spaces: An Interview with Esmé Weijun Wang

By Larissa Pham | May 9, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Writer and mental health advocate Esmé Weijun Wang talks about languages, love, immigrant children, and her debut novel, The Border of Paradise

Lives You Never Had: Two Poems by Tyler Tsay

By Tyler Tsay | May 3, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop
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‘the games you played as a child: / cracks breaking bones with every step. alive because / that’s your job.’

dear Bambi: Three Poems by Kristin Chang

By Kristin Chang | April 26, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘So be / domestic, Bambi / no one kills a pet / So sell your flesh / for fabric, Bambi. Leash / your skin to a lawn / meat yourself.’

Two Mothers: A Comic Based on Interviews with the Mothers of Akai Gurley and Peter Liang

By Asians4Peace | April 20, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘How should I feel after bringing someone into the world to them have them unjustly taken from me?’

A House Made of Flames: Two Poems by Albert Abonado

By Albert Abonado | April 19, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

When we point towards the horizon and say this is the color / of our grandfather, we do not know for how long // the night will carry your shade or what winds / brought you here.

Kareem: An Excerpt from Technologies of the Self

By Haris A. Durrani | April 15, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘He lingered on the edges of my social field of view, here in the basement lab where it was hot and loud’

Hasanthika Sirisena’s Country Surrealism

By Leland Cheuk | April 13, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The author talks about her award-winning collection of short stories, which takes us on a contemporary Sri Lankan’s global journey

The Clouds Followed Us: Two Poems by Hala Alyan

By Hala Alyan | April 12, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘We begged our bodies for / alchemy, death into new lungs, we fed bread / to the jinn’

Only the Clotheslines Knew: Poems by Zeina Hashem Beck

By Zeina Hashem Beck | April 12, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘You’ve memorized its bends like a prayer, / its long silver-gray hair, / its cigarettes, its favorite / songs and curse words, / the holes in its shirts.’

Ochazuke

By Mike Fu | April 8, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘He doubts he has the capacity to uproot himself and start over in a foreign land at this age. But times of war and revolution have a tendency to embolden the meek, to electrify the confident.’

The End of History

By Kristine Sloan | April 5, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘The right to hxstory is the right to know. / I need to know how my mind is theft. / My body is property because my mind is theft. / I say “woman” and I can still move my mouth.’

Hour of the Ox: Poems by Marci Calabretta Cancio-Bello

By Marci Calabretta Cancio-Bello | March 29, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

We graze our fingers through damselfish schools, // but our appetites are as insatiate as the sea is for land. / We gnaw the shore, legs wound in seaweed, / skin flayed by the tongues of clams, pulling, pushing.

Meet AAWW’s 2016 Open City and Margins Fellows

By AAWW | March 25, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Follow the work of these ten writers in our online magazines.

AAWW TV: Remixing Guantanamo Bay

By AAWW | March 23, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Poet Philip Metres talks about why he chose to create an opera from a redacted history of torture

Chinese Dreams: Two Poems by Timothy Yu

By Timothy Yu | March 22, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘At Downtown Crossing // he trail the shoppers, buying nothing, & rub / his rented nose. He know: myself am hell. / His feet unmoved in the snow.’

A Penny Short

By Peter HZ Hsu | March 18, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘I left them both at the wedding reception. The best man was toasting the groom by listing all the women he’d given up for his new bride, and I’d had about enough.’

Each seed a set of rules growing apart: A Poem by Kenji Liu

By Kenji C. Liu | March 15, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘How many times in the dark? A brick for every freedom to hold its dream in. Will the Sun make his own grim entrance?’

Matt Huynh Inks Stories of an Inherited War

By Michelle Chen | March 11, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The artist’s interactive graphic novel adaptation of Nam Le’s “The Boat” is an entry point to a conversation about refugees today

Edge of a Time Zone: Two Poems by Ae Hee Lee

By Ae Hee Lee | March 8, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

You said you were an ant, eyes frozen / on an indigo wave looming over the world. / (You reset every time / you move forward.)

Ghost Forest

By Pik-Shuen Fung | March 4, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘Say, I’m here, Dad, my mom said. I’m here, Dad, I said. You have to say it louder so he can hear you.’

High-Wire Acts: An Interview with Alexander Chee

By Catherine Chung | March 2, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The author of the The Queen of the Night talks about being possessed by a woman who never lived and how writing fiction is all about bringing to life the thing you see that nobody else can

March First Movement: Korean Translations

By Kim Kirim, Im Hwa, and Kim So-wŏl | March 1, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘All the bitter things, one by one, in a rush, / She wants to swallow. Clothed in blueblack scales in a forest of iodine-colored seaweeds, / She wants to be chased by a shark.’

Ashok and Hua Freestyle in a Freezing Greenpoint Park

By Ashok Kondabolu | February 25, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Journalist and music critic Hua Hsu talks to Ashok Kondabolu about the best and worst of his dad’s record collection and how his fascination with rap beef inspired his upcoming book

To an Unknown Passenger

By Phinder Dulai | February 23, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘my hulled hands crash against the tide / to the unloved I will offer / a part of me / in hope my wards will be made complete / for another life’

My Family Was Under Threat

By Meiko Ko | February 19, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘I’m conducting an experiment for escape.’

The Fates: Two Poems by Eddie Kim

By Eddie Kim | February 16, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘There’s a piece of me / that has never been / to this country and another that never left. // I stare at strangers as if they might be friends. // It took three weeks of traveling / before anywhere looked like home.’

Death is a Festival

By Anis Shivani | February 9, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘He knew the genealogies and coats of arms of / all his neighbors, with pride at its right hand and / cruelty at its left’

Foraging

By Aditya Desai | February 5, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

He’d gotten used to the routine of filling out the job applications: name, address, past positions, done. But then came that deadly box, ‘Have you ever been convicted of a crime or felony?’

Bite Hard: Three Poems by Justin Chin (1969-2015)

By Justin Chin | February 2, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘when I am dark/ when I am no more light/ when I am no / more an abomination/ when I am no more shame/ when I am face / again/ when the collective being of me worships god, family, / education and the collective administrative silver spoon, / then I will be back in the fold.’

History Through Invention: Iksaka Banu’s “Farewell to Hindia”

By Iksaka Banu | January 29, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘When the Japanese were in power, I realized that the Dutch East Indies with all of its aristocratic ways, was finished. I must have the guts to say goodbye to it. And whatever fate befalls me, I will remain here.’

Another Kind of Death

By Lillian Kalish | January 28, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

It was just the right and wrong moment to leave, to go to China, to live in a country where the weight of blackness might not hinder your breathing. And yet, there were things you were afraid of losing.

What I Saw Through The Telescope

By Jess X. Chen | January 26, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘We are given a face, / which means we are given / a vessel of blood to call body, / & lungs–that know the alchemy / of altering wind into breath–the way / plants are always transforming / someone’s last words / into oxygen.’

Now Alive, Now Burning: Three Poems by Yuki Tanaka

By Yuki Tanaka | January 19, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘We melted in amnesia, bubbled up / from the ocean, rinsed clean / of appetite, all healed, / all negated, a sequence of two spines / imitating an arrow. A jaguar loved us. / He licked where our hips had been, / and we cucooked in reply.’

Digging a Hole to China

By Michelle Chen | January 15, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

In Huan Hsu’s The Porcelain Thief, the search for a family treasure unearths the spell of nostalgia

Letters for __________you.

By Esther Lee | January 12, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘You brace yourself against the oncoming. But today the sea glistens like the fish you used to scale.’

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