Articles in the Everything Category
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Pei Pei Wept: A Translation by Henry Wei Leung

By Lo Mei Wa | July 26, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘That day, I came of age / And became a child.’

The Misadventures of Asian Americans

By Leland Cheuk | July 20, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Leland Cheuk and YiShun Lai discuss their debut novels, dysfunctional families, and writing the Asian American antihero

Poetry From the Schoolyard: A-Z American Born Chinese

By Sophia Huynh | July 19, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘I remember when I first learned my ABCs. A is for apple, B is for bird, and C is for cat, but further experience taught me, that ABC means American Born Chinese.’

Chris Jackson Accepts AAWW’s Editorial Achievement Award

By Chris Jackson | July 19, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

To get free, to tell the truth, sometimes requires new language that might not fit through that narrow channel of the dominant culture.

The Day: Poetry by Barbara Jane Reyes

By Barbara Jane Reyes | July 12, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘Sometimes you are damaged. You think poetry will repair you. You think poetry should repair you. You shake your fist at it when it doesn’t. You walk hand-in-hand with your damage, into the world. You do not speak. You are surprised when people register you are there.’

Letting the Dogs Out: Two Poems by Carlina Duan

By Carlina Duan | July 5, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘there was / my mother packaging miàn tiáo by the sink. / breath in the morning. breath in the afternoon. / the way history comes back to haunt me with / a plump fist. the way my mouth, a cave, opened / and closed.’

Hong Kong vs. Goliath

By Elaine Yu and Jeffrey Wasserstrom | July 2, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

With Canto-pop star Denise Ho and bookseller-turned-whistleblower Lam Wing-Kee, Hong Kong’s pro-democracy movement is putting the old tactic of boycotts to new use

Blue Skies

By Sobia Khan | July 1, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘That first day in America, she didn’t know the difference between police officers and immigration officers, or between waiting rooms and holding cells.’

The Fiction of Our Experiences: An Interview with Mia Alvar

By Melissa Sipin | June 30, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘Imagination can make things more real than they would be if they were just reported from real life’—the author of In the Country speaks on writing stories of south-south migration and when not to be faithful to a map.

A Tongue I Can Use: Two Poems by Hayun Cho

By Hayun Cho | June 28, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘You hold the knife, you drink the sorrows. / You burn your hands making tea. / When something hurts, / You no longer feel rage. / You wipe up the mess. / Outside, dusk is the color of Violet and ash.’

AAWW TV: Archive Seance with M. NourbeSe Philip and Phinder Dulai

By | June 23, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

From the slave ship Zong to the Japanese steamship Komagata Maru, two experimental poets draw on legal papers and ship records as they raise spirits from the sea

The Vanishing Point: Writers Speak to Kim Hyesoon’s Poetry in Translation

By Joyelle McSweeney and Johannes Göransson | June 23, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“It seems that reading Kim Hyesoon in English and from the United States entails a radical re-positioning of one’s reading perspective, from imperial center to the vanishing point.”

Nostalgia Is Your Sibling: Two Poems by Michelle Peñaloza

By Michelle Peñaloza | June 21, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘I wanted to be the last of my people, / a girl without mother, father, sister, brother— / a girl belonging to no one, / my only belongings a cormorant skirt / and a cage of tiny birds.’

Reunion

By Denis Wong | June 17, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘Danny’s hands dropped to his knees as he gasped. He felt something…a fist pressed against his face. I’m being punched, he thought as he fell. This is me being punched. It was a familiar feeling. Almost nostalgic.’

AAWW TV: Poetry & Politics

By AAWW | June 16, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Poets Monica Sok, Aimee Suzara, and David Mura explore their political landscapes through poems on the Khmer Rouge, the 1904 St. Louis World’s Fair, family, and antiblackness.

Pitch and Frequency by Sun Yung Shin

By Sun Yung Shin | June 14, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

My shadow turned to rust / …dust at the first strong wind / … the lungs of others / …hard to breathe / …to follow me / No one to lick out your lungs? / – sweep out the curious orange flakes?

Ventricles Embrace: Three Poems by Jen Hyde

By Jen Hyde | June 7, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘I am looking at pictures on a very large / chair in a room with white / walls my mother wipes daily. / Her shoulder is a shelter on which I arrange / rock formations to resemble skin burdens.’

China in the American Imagination: A Survey of Ephemera

By Hua Hsu | June 7, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

From Pearl Buck’s “The Good Earth” to the FBI files of HT Tsiang, a journey into the archives with Hua Hsu

All This Paper

By Joseph Han | June 3, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘The signs were like a collective raft, keeping them afloat as they waited on responses to their calls of distress.’

Why I Will Never Celebrate Indian Arrival Day

By Rajiv Mohabir | June 2, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Indentured labor in the Caribbean marked the beginning of disease, dependencies, prejudices, and ills that continue to plague Indo-Caribbean communities

By the River: Two Poems by Bing Li

By Bing Li | May 31, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop
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‘I told, my dear, I was living living living in the river. / I told, her then, I was dying dying dying not to shiver.’

Horror Story

By Rachel Rostad | May 24, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘In my favorite fiction about us, I would see you and some bell within me would toll—the way an elephant will walk over the bones of its own kind, know it instantly, and fall down and mourn. Instead, I looked away. What struck me was not like lightning or love, and so I wept.’

What Makes Pussy So Problematic?

By Rokudenashiko | May 18, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The story behind Japanese artist Rokudenashiko’s arrest for her vagina-inspired sculptures

Lavender Town: Three Poems by Sally Wen Mao

By Sally Wen Mao | May 17, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘When you climb the stairway, / don’t shield your eyes / from the pixels, 30 hertz heat— / don’t shield your awe / from the ghosts of pretty prey’

Kate Gavino’s ABCs of Being an Asian American Writer

By Kate Gavino | May 13, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

From Ann M. Martin’s Claudia Kishi to intersectionality, SPAM, and The Woman Warrior

The Next Bruce Lee and Other Poems by Kien Lam

By Kien Lam | May 10, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘I’ve heard the way some people breathe / at night and it made me want / to close their mouths. I think / inside of all of us lies / an animal trying its best to escape.’

Blank, White Spaces: An Interview with Esmé Weijun Wang

By Larissa Pham | May 9, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Writer and mental health advocate Esmé Weijun Wang talks about languages, love, immigrant children, and her debut novel, The Border of Paradise

Lives You Never Had: Two Poems by Tyler Tsay

By Tyler Tsay | May 3, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop
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‘the games you played as a child: / cracks breaking bones with every step. alive because / that’s your job.’

dear Bambi: Three Poems by Kristin Chang

By Kristin Chang | April 26, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘So be / domestic, Bambi / no one kills a pet / So sell your flesh / for fabric, Bambi. Leash / your skin to a lawn / meat yourself.’

Two Mothers: A Comic Based on Interviews with the Mothers of Akai Gurley and Peter Liang

By Asians4Peace | April 20, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘How should I feel after bringing someone into the world to them have them unjustly taken from me?’

A House Made of Flames: Two Poems by Albert Abonado

By Albert Abonado | April 19, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

When we point towards the horizon and say this is the color / of our grandfather, we do not know for how long // the night will carry your shade or what winds / brought you here.

Kareem: An Excerpt from Technologies of the Self

By Haris A. Durrani | April 15, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘He lingered on the edges of my social field of view, here in the basement lab where it was hot and loud’

Hasanthika Sirisena’s Country Surrealism

By Leland Cheuk | April 13, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The author talks about her award-winning collection of short stories, which takes us on a contemporary Sri Lankan’s global journey

The Clouds Followed Us: Two Poems by Hala Alyan

By Hala Alyan | April 12, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘We begged our bodies for / alchemy, death into new lungs, we fed bread / to the jinn’

Only the Clotheslines Knew: Poems by Zeina Hashem Beck

By Zeina Hashem Beck | April 12, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘You’ve memorized its bends like a prayer, / its long silver-gray hair, / its cigarettes, its favorite / songs and curse words, / the holes in its shirts.’

Ochazuke

By Mike Fu | April 8, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘He doubts he has the capacity to uproot himself and start over in a foreign land at this age. But times of war and revolution have a tendency to embolden the meek, to electrify the confident.’

The End of History

By Kristine Sloan | April 5, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘The right to hxstory is the right to know. / I need to know how my mind is theft. / My body is property because my mind is theft. / I say “woman” and I can still move my mouth.’

Hour of the Ox: Poems by Marci Calabretta Cancio-Bello

By Marci Calabretta Cancio-Bello | March 29, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

We graze our fingers through damselfish schools, // but our appetites are as insatiate as the sea is for land. / We gnaw the shore, legs wound in seaweed, / skin flayed by the tongues of clams, pulling, pushing.

Meet AAWW’s 2016 Open City and Margins Fellows

By AAWW | March 25, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Follow the work of these ten writers in our online magazines.

AAWW TV: Remixing Guantanamo Bay

By AAWW | March 23, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Poet Philip Metres talks about why he chose to create an opera from a redacted history of torture

Chinese Dreams: Two Poems by Timothy Yu

By Timothy Yu | March 22, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘At Downtown Crossing // he trail the shoppers, buying nothing, & rub / his rented nose. He know: myself am hell. / His feet unmoved in the snow.’

A Penny Short

By Peter HZ Hsu | March 18, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘I left them both at the wedding reception. The best man was toasting the groom by listing all the women he’d given up for his new bride, and I’d had about enough.’

Each seed a set of rules growing apart: A Poem by Kenji Liu

By Kenji C. Liu | March 15, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘How many times in the dark? A brick for every freedom to hold its dream in. Will the Sun make his own grim entrance?’

Matt Huynh Inks Stories of an Inherited War

By Michelle Chen | March 11, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The artist’s interactive graphic novel adaptation of Nam Le’s “The Boat” is an entry point to a conversation about refugees today

Edge of a Time Zone: Two Poems by Ae Hee Lee

By Ae Hee Lee | March 8, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

You said you were an ant, eyes frozen / on an indigo wave looming over the world. / (You reset every time / you move forward.)

Ghost Forest

By Pik-Shuen Fung | March 4, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘Say, I’m here, Dad, my mom said. I’m here, Dad, I said. You have to say it louder so he can hear you.’

High-Wire Acts: An Interview with Alexander Chee

By Catherine Chung | March 2, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The author of the The Queen of the Night talks about being possessed by a woman who never lived and how writing fiction is all about bringing to life the thing you see that nobody else can

March First Movement: Korean Translations

By Kim Kirim, Im Hwa, and Kim So-wŏl | March 1, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘All the bitter things, one by one, in a rush, / She wants to swallow. Clothed in blueblack scales in a forest of iodine-colored seaweeds, / She wants to be chased by a shark.’

Ashok and Hua Freestyle in a Freezing Greenpoint Park

By Ashok Kondabolu | February 25, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Journalist and music critic Hua Hsu talks to Ashok Kondabolu about the best and worst of his dad’s record collection and how his fascination with rap beef inspired his upcoming book

To an Unknown Passenger

By Phinder Dulai | February 23, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘my hulled hands crash against the tide / to the unloved I will offer / a part of me / in hope my wards will be made complete / for another life’

My Family Was Under Threat

By Meiko Ko | February 19, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘I’m conducting an experiment for escape.’

The Fates: Two Poems by Eddie Kim

By Eddie Kim | February 16, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘There’s a piece of me / that has never been / to this country and another that never left. // I stare at strangers as if they might be friends. // It took three weeks of traveling / before anywhere looked like home.’

Death is a Festival

By Anis Shivani | February 9, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘He knew the genealogies and coats of arms of / all his neighbors, with pride at its right hand and / cruelty at its left’

Foraging

By Aditya Desai | February 5, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

He’d gotten used to the routine of filling out the job applications: name, address, past positions, done. But then came that deadly box, ‘Have you ever been convicted of a crime or felony?’

Bite Hard: Three Poems by Justin Chin (1969-2015)

By Justin Chin | February 2, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘when I am dark/ when I am no more light/ when I am no / more an abomination/ when I am no more shame/ when I am face / again/ when the collective being of me worships god, family, / education and the collective administrative silver spoon, / then I will be back in the fold.’

History Through Invention: Iksaka Banu’s “Farewell to Hindia”

By Iksaka Banu | January 29, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘When the Japanese were in power, I realized that the Dutch East Indies with all of its aristocratic ways, was finished. I must have the guts to say goodbye to it. And whatever fate befalls me, I will remain here.’

Another Kind of Death

By Lillian Kalish | January 28, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

It was just the right and wrong moment to leave, to go to China, to live in a country where the weight of blackness might not hinder your breathing. And yet, there were things you were afraid of losing.

What I Saw Through The Telescope

By Jess X. Chen | January 26, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘We are given a face, / which means we are given / a vessel of blood to call body, / & lungs–that know the alchemy / of altering wind into breath–the way / plants are always transforming / someone’s last words / into oxygen.’

Now Alive, Now Burning: Three Poems by Yuki Tanaka

By Yuki Tanaka | January 19, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘We melted in amnesia, bubbled up / from the ocean, rinsed clean / of appetite, all healed, / all negated, a sequence of two spines / imitating an arrow. A jaguar loved us. / He licked where our hips had been, / and we cucooked in reply.’

Digging a Hole to China

By Michelle Chen | January 15, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

In Huan Hsu’s The Porcelain Thief, the search for a family treasure unearths the spell of nostalgia

Letters for __________you.

By Esther Lee | January 12, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘You brace yourself against the oncoming. But today the sea glistens like the fish you used to scale.’

Line Break Courage and Other Poems by Zhou Sivan

By Zhou Sivan | January 5, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘we need to reinvent the image of tragedy for the nation everyday / or even in the everyday / get incensed or pretend to be so or else there is no exit and no future’

Chopped: Four Sections

By Wo Chan | December 29, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘All your potatoes on the ground—you were never meant for this. The camerawoman tiptoes around spilled tubers as she zooms in on your front teeth, tearing open a parcel of dried shrimp. ‘

Five Boroughs, Seven Killings

By Rishi Nath | December 28, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

New York City through Marlon James’ Booker Prize-winning novel

The Starfruit Tree

By Ashwak Fardoush | December 25, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘Because she had saved my sister once, when my mother tried to pound out the wildness from my sister’s body with both words and sticks, no one ever came to rescue her.’

Flowers of Yarn

By Rowan Hisayo Buchanan | December 16, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

A graphic memoir on ritual and mourning

No Need for the Moon to Shine in It

By Jane Wong | December 15, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘Murder is to mitosis is to mercy. / We are mostly legs too: part tendon, part pardon, kicking / or curling.’

I am a Slave to Narrative

By Melani Budianta and Yvonne Michalik | December 10, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The Indonesian fiction writer Intan Paramaditha on the political potential of horror and writing as a feminist practice

Bad Women: Intan Paramaditha’s “Apple and Knife”

By Intan Paramaditha | December 10, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘In this way, people kept talking about her, and she continued to come to family gatherings. In the eyes of my relatives, she remained a problem that refused to be simplified.’

Solar Maximum: Poems by Sueyeun Juliette Lee

By Sueyeun Juliette Lee | December 8, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘Being alive has again made something new, something that may not be true of justice but is a basic commonplace in evolutionary theory. To forebear is one attitude, rising in an infinite return another.’

Terrorist-ish

By Shymala Dason | December 4, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘Shouldn’t be singing such a song, Ravi knew. But what to do? Inspiration, that was what was happening to him. He couldn’t help it. Had to let it out. He was artist. Couldn’t be always thinking about wars and horrors.’

Returning: Two Poems by Wendy Chin-Tanner

By Wendy Chin-Tanner | December 1, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘If not agates, then barnacles, if not / sweet-smelling seaweed, then shattered shells./ The traveler need not journey on. // If not mussels, then sea glass, if not // smooth surfaces, then rocks pocked by anemones. / The traveler’s journey is one of return.’

Until the Red Runs Out: Two Poems by Muriel Leung

By Muriel Leung | November 24, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘Match lit by a shadow’s curiosity. / Though I was not there for it, I still tasted their meat // and their marrow held a sweetness.’

Lycoris Radiata

By Kou Sugita | November 17, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘Do you hear / the rainfall beating / on cowhide skin / father? It is the life / of autumn, / supernova / booming’

Why I Set My Novel in an Unnamed Country

By Chaitali Sen | November 12, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

An imaginary setting gave me, a child of immigrants, the authority to write about belonging unquestionably to one’s surroundings

Great Object of the Ocean: Poems by B.B.P. Hosmillo

By B.B.P. Hosmillo | November 10, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘Your mouth a little wound with a little reason to be / involved is why alienation is a body part, which moves / you to harshly ask if death really wanted what it wanted, / if its sole duty is to be observed all the time.’

Everyday Islam: Abidah El Khalieqy’s Mataraisa

By Abidah El Khalieqy | November 6, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘But what has happened in our era? If just one vocal daring woman steps forth and speaks of the inequalities of the age and criticizes the establishment, especially those who hold authority, then she is immediately muzzled!’

miki endo as flint marko (a.k.a. sandman)

By Lee Ann Roripaugh | November 3, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘but what if it was something once / vulnerable, downy, and warm? // something severed or stillborn? // something with pulse and blood / and breath bitten right out of it?’

Nonstop Mixing: The Bay Area’s First Filipino Mobile DJ Crew

By Oliver Wang | November 2, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

In the mid-1970s, with a DIY fog machine and light stands made of tire rims, Sound Explosion brought the experience of the discotheque back to garage parties, school dances, and weddings.

Setting a Place

By Rohan Kamicheril | October 28, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Sustainable eating can often feel like the privilege of a well-heeled elite, but how do the appetites and labor of New York City’s immigrant communities fit into the picture?

And If There Was No Country by J. Mae Barizo

By J. Mae Barizo | October 27, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘And they were a solemn people: naming / the world, mapping it out, arguing about what it meant. Clandestine as / husbands’

Bardo

By Muna Gurung | October 23, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘I wonder what happens to skin when it is robbed of touch. Does it break? Does it know to breathe? Does it forget the painful sweetness of a tickle?’

Pray Away from Our Adolescence: Poems by J.H. Yun

By J.H. Yun | October 20, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘Pastor says / abstain, says sins of the flesh, says hell. But when we see the boys / with their strong corded necks that make us crazy, we want and we do not.’

57+ Moves in Contemporary Flash Fiction

By Matthew Salesses | October 19, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Fabulism as conflict, punchlines, symbolic white space, and more

Getting to Know You: Broadway Meets Heart Mountain

By Hana C. Maruyama | October 15, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

As George Takei’s Allegiance makes its way to Broadway, a look back at how choreographer and dancer Michiko Iseri went from the Heart Mountain incarceration camp to the first production of The King and I in 1951

I’m Nature Boy: Two Poems by Albert Saijo

By Albert Saijo | October 13, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“ALL WILL COME BACK FROM ROOTS – NOTHING KILLS BLACKBERRY – BUT WHERE ARE ALL THE SPARROWS”

You are Nothing But a Dog

By Vt Hung | October 9, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“When she began crying, I thought about the rainfall in Viet Nam, how she said it was so heavy a person could hide in it.”

Red Squiggle

By Rowan Hisayo Buchanan | October 8, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

When spell check doesn’t recognize your name

Over the Fields: Two Poems by Angela Peñaredondo

By Angela Peñaredondo | October 6, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘They love long hours of blackout. / They love this snuffed out match / of a little city. To the dust that separates // stained lace. To the poor / thrum of humidity.’

Samira en Moses: A Story of [the] Lesser Pilgrimage

By Mariam Bazeed

Illustrations by Mariah Scee

| September 29, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘My father had seen us wrestle the men, had seen our bodies thrown into the sea of their desires, had seen my mother part the waves: Samira en Moses, minus divine intervention.’

Beaching: Two Poems by Jenna Le

By Jenna Le | September 29, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘The first boy that I dated weighted down his coif / with so much hair gel that the crest atop his pate / was hard as horses’ teeth’

The Night Suzy Link Goes Missing

By Lisa Ko | September 24, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘Last week some of the other kids dug a hole to China in the dirt lot behind the Purtells’ house. Down at the end of Locust Street, that swampy neverland that reeked of skunk cabbage.’

Why I Wrote a Novel About Indonesian Political Exiles

By Leila S. Chudori | September 24, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘For me, who grew up and became an adult during the New Order period, I was conscious of a historical and political absurdity. I began to feel that there were some Indonesians who had become invisible.’

Rewriting History: Leila S. Chudori’s Home

By Leila S. Chudori | September 24, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘Where was Mas Han? What was he running from? And why hadn’t he called or tried to get in contact with me? These were my questions, those of a wife, a woman, who had no idea how what had happened would affect the fate of the Indonesian people.’

Private Manning by Kazim Ali

By Kazim Ali | September 23, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘On the radio they are playing a record that is skipping. A deep-voiced woman joyfully sings, “My life has just begun– gun– gun–”’

Immigrant Cartography by Cathy Guo

By Cathy Guo | September 22, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘No others no-place/what to do but hoard the remaining solaces’

Yellow Peril: 19th-Century Scapegoating

By John Kuo Wei Tchen and Dylan Yeats | March 5, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

How fear of the “the mob” turned into racial exclusion. Excerpts from a recently published archive of anti-Asian fear

Timothy McVeigh and our “Buried History”

By Manan Ahmed | June 27, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

On the domestic terror of the 1990s, and avoiding cultural amnesia.

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