Articles in the Everything Category
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Keeping Tabs: Gridded Space

By AAWW | September 23, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Urban university politics, labor strikes, skateboard tricks, probably-canned broth, and more.

Self-Portrait as GPS

By Steven Chung | September 20, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

How the steering wheel / points nowhere except towards itself. / And such is the spinning of the mind: / everywhere. When we drove into new / cities it was only a different shape of haze.

Keeping Tabs: Covering Ground

By AAWW | September 16, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Growing into community action, genealogy, dystopia, and more.

Tickets to Disneyland

By Fan Wu | September 16, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘Bonita, that engineer from Spain who always worked late, must have gone home already. Yong looked down at his ironed shirt and felt disappointed—if he had done the third floor half an hour earlier he might have seen her.’

Ashok and Ayesha Take a Break from the American Dream

By Ashok Kondabolu | September 16, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Writer Ayesha Siddiqi talks to Ashok Kondabolu about growing anti-Muslim anxieties, her new job at Viceland and what keeps people up at night.

Still Dirty: Two Poems by David Lau

By David Lau | September 13, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘No motions./A tonic in page display tufts,/call me switch-foot, a check away from homeless./You get there. Intentional.’

Peter Ho Davies: Occupying the Space Between

By Lillian Li | September 12, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The author of The Fortunes talks about immigrant survival, our multiple selves, and who tells and receives the Chinese-American story

The Last Time I Saw Her: Poems by Mari L’Esperance

By Mari L'Esperance | September 6, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘Grief is deep green and carries a sharp scent./ Memory and rain are like nothing that keeps./ She disappeared in the season of roubai.’

Liked by Few, Hated by Most, Feared by All

By Vt Hung | September 2, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

I see my forebears, warriors in retirement, laboring in endless fields, bustling markets, and desolate seas. One by one they all stop, turn to me, and say: “If you have good hands, anything can happen.”

Growing Up in the 626

By Katie Salisbury | August 31, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Coming to terms with my mixed-race heritage as a kid in Southern California’s largest Asian enclave

Keeping Tabs: Retraced Steps

By AAWW | August 27, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Remembering family genealogies, the Asian American Movement, solidarity lines, and organizing for liberation.

Ashok and Riz the Day Of

By Ashok Kondabolu | August 25, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘The Night Of’ star Riz Ahmed talks to Ashok Kondabolu about cricket jerseys, patriotism, acting while brown, and race in the UK.

Hong Gildong: Classic Korean Fiction’s Number One Hero

By Minsoo Kang | August 23, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The frustrations and aspirations of the most famous outlaw from Korean pre-modern literature echo a story of modern Korea.

Why I Write in English

By Yang Huang | August 22, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘Wanting privacy in a police state was sheer stupidity’—to tell the stories of her family in China without the threat of censorship, Yang Huang had to look beyond Mandarin.

Keeping Tabs: Sport in Translation

By AAWW | August 20, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Lost memories of India’s Olympic team, transversal writing, translation and multilingualism, the necropastoral, vampires, and more.

An Artificial Organ

By Sarah Wang | August 19, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘What else was contained within the pages? What had come before the tofu boxes and dusty scrolls, the grumpy old man who spent his last two decades in America cloistered in my uncle’s back house?’

When the Chant Comes: Two Poems by Kay Ulanday Barrett

By Kay Ulanday Barrett | August 16, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘After midnight you assemble your limbs back to / their rightful place as you rid the pressure formed / by all day heat and no privacy.’

None of the Furniture Fits: Two Poems by Sunu Chandy

By Sunu P. Chandy | August 9, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘I lifted / an arm, to signify the range / of human voice. Somewhere in the week, / a detour from grief.’

Pacita

By Melissa R. Sipin | August 5, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘I am, I want to be, the rain, I want to be the ocean, just so I could say back to her: I am home now.’

But Who Is Listening Now?

By Nancy Jooyoun Kim | August 3, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

What the painful process of learning Korean, the language spoken by those who love me, has taught me about facing rejection as a writer

Letters to Mao: Two Poems by Jennifer S. Cheng

By Jennifer S. Cheng | August 2, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘How to measure my body home, which is to say, how many names can you give to an immigrant’s geography? Delta Court, Tai Tam, Outer Sunset; finally, a dream to reach the edge of the sea.’

How to Fly While Arab

By Randa Jarrar | July 27, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

A guide to help you get from here to there while Arab — from speaking Arabic to passing the salt

Pei Pei Wept by Lo Mei Wa

By Lo Mei Wa | July 26, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘That day, I came of age / And became a child.’

The Misadventures of Asian Americans

By Leland Cheuk | July 20, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Leland Cheuk and YiShun Lai discuss their debut novels, dysfunctional families, and writing the Asian American antihero

Poetry From the Schoolyard: A-Z American Born Chinese

By Sophia Huynh | July 19, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘I remember when I first learned my ABCs. A is for apple, B is for bird, and C is for cat, but further experience taught me, that ABC means American Born Chinese.’

Chris Jackson Accepts AAWW’s Editorial Achievement Award

By Chris Jackson | July 19, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

To get free, to tell the truth, sometimes requires new language that might not fit through that narrow channel of the dominant culture.

The Day: Poetry by Barbara Jane Reyes

By Barbara Jane Reyes | July 12, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘Sometimes you are damaged. You think poetry will repair you. You think poetry should repair you. You shake your fist at it when it doesn’t. You walk hand-in-hand with your damage, into the world. You do not speak. You are surprised when people register you are there.’

Letting the Dogs Out: Two Poems by Carlina Duan

By Carlina Duan | July 5, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘there was / my mother packaging miàn tiáo by the sink. / breath in the morning. breath in the afternoon. / the way history comes back to haunt me with / a plump fist. the way my mouth, a cave, opened / and closed.’

Hong Kong vs. Goliath

By Elaine Yu and Jeffrey Wasserstrom | July 2, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

With Canto-pop star Denise Ho and bookseller-turned-whistleblower Lam Wing-Kee, Hong Kong’s pro-democracy movement is putting the old tactic of boycotts to new use

Blue Skies

By Sobia Khan | July 1, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘That first day in America, she didn’t know the difference between police officers and immigration officers, or between waiting rooms and holding cells.’

The Fiction of Our Experiences: An Interview with Mia Alvar

By Melissa Sipin | June 30, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘Imagination can make things more real than they would be if they were just reported from real life’—the author of In the Country speaks on writing stories of south-south migration and when not to be faithful to a map.

A Tongue I Can Use: Two Poems by Hayun Cho

By Hayun Cho | June 28, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘You hold the knife, you drink the sorrows. / You burn your hands making tea. / When something hurts, / You no longer feel rage. / You wipe up the mess. / Outside, dusk is the color of Violet and ash.’

AAWW TV: Archive Seance with M. NourbeSe Philip and Phinder Dulai

By | June 23, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

From the slave ship Zong to the Japanese steamship Komagata Maru, two experimental poets draw on legal papers and ship records as they raise spirits from the sea

The Vanishing Point: Writers Speak to Kim Hyesoon’s Poetry in Translation

By Joyelle McSweeney and Johannes Göransson | June 23, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“It seems that reading Kim Hyesoon in English and from the United States entails a radical re-positioning of one’s reading perspective, from imperial center to the vanishing point.”

Nostalgia Is Your Sibling: Two Poems by Michelle Peñaloza

By Michelle Peñaloza | June 21, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘I wanted to be the last of my people, / a girl without mother, father, sister, brother— / a girl belonging to no one, / my only belongings a cormorant skirt / and a cage of tiny birds.’

Reunion

By Denis Wong | June 17, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘Danny’s hands dropped to his knees as he gasped. He felt something…a fist pressed against his face. I’m being punched, he thought as he fell. This is me being punched. It was a familiar feeling. Almost nostalgic.’

AAWW TV: Poetry & Politics

By AAWW | June 16, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Poets Monica Sok, Aimee Suzara, and David Mura explore their political landscapes through poems on the Khmer Rouge, the 1904 St. Louis World’s Fair, family, and antiblackness.

Pitch and Frequency by Sun Yung Shin

By Sun Yung Shin | June 14, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

My shadow turned to rust / …dust at the first strong wind / … the lungs of others / …hard to breathe / …to follow me / No one to lick out your lungs? / – sweep out the curious orange flakes?

Ventricles Embrace: Three Poems by Jen Hyde

By Jen Hyde | June 7, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘I am looking at pictures on a very large / chair in a room with white / walls my mother wipes daily. / Her shoulder is a shelter on which I arrange / rock formations to resemble skin burdens.’

China in the American Imagination: A Survey of Ephemera

By Hua Hsu | June 7, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

From Pearl Buck’s “The Good Earth” to the FBI files of HT Tsiang, a journey into the archives with Hua Hsu

All This Paper

By Joseph Han | June 3, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘The signs were like a collective raft, keeping them afloat as they waited on responses to their calls of distress.’

Why I Will Never Celebrate Indian Arrival Day

By Rajiv Mohabir | June 2, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Indentured labor in the Caribbean marked the beginning of disease, dependencies, prejudices, and ills that continue to plague Indo-Caribbean communities

By the River: Two Poems by Bing Li

By Bing Li | May 31, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop
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‘I told, my dear, I was living living living in the river. / I told, her then, I was dying dying dying not to shiver.’

Horror Story

By Rachel Rostad | May 24, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘In my favorite fiction about us, I would see you and some bell within me would toll—the way an elephant will walk over the bones of its own kind, know it instantly, and fall down and mourn. Instead, I looked away. What struck me was not like lightning or love, and so I wept.’

What Makes Pussy So Problematic?

By Rokudenashiko | May 18, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The story behind Japanese artist Rokudenashiko’s arrest for her vagina-inspired sculptures

Lavender Town: Three Poems by Sally Wen Mao

By Sally Wen Mao | May 17, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘When you climb the stairway, / don’t shield your eyes / from the pixels, 30 hertz heat— / don’t shield your awe / from the ghosts of pretty prey’

Kate Gavino’s ABCs of Being an Asian American Writer

By Kate Gavino | May 13, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

From Ann M. Martin’s Claudia Kishi to intersectionality, SPAM, and The Woman Warrior

The Next Bruce Lee and Other Poems by Kien Lam

By Kien Lam | May 10, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘I’ve heard the way some people breathe / at night and it made me want / to close their mouths. I think / inside of all of us lies / an animal trying its best to escape.’

Blank, White Spaces: An Interview with Esmé Weijun Wang

By Larissa Pham | May 9, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Writer and mental health advocate Esmé Weijun Wang talks about languages, love, immigrant children, and her debut novel, The Border of Paradise

Lives You Never Had: Two Poems by Tyler Tsay

By Tyler Tsay | May 3, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop
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‘the games you played as a child: / cracks breaking bones with every step. alive because / that’s your job.’

dear Bambi: Three Poems by Kristin Chang

By Kristin Chang | April 26, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘So be / domestic, Bambi / no one kills a pet / So sell your flesh / for fabric, Bambi. Leash / your skin to a lawn / meat yourself.’

Two Mothers: A Comic Based on Interviews with the Mothers of Akai Gurley and Peter Liang

By Asians4Peace | April 20, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘How should I feel after bringing someone into the world to them have them unjustly taken from me?’

A House Made of Flames: Two Poems by Albert Abonado

By Albert Abonado | April 19, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

When we point towards the horizon and say this is the color / of our grandfather, we do not know for how long // the night will carry your shade or what winds / brought you here.

Kareem: An Excerpt from Technologies of the Self

By Haris A. Durrani | April 15, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘He lingered on the edges of my social field of view, here in the basement lab where it was hot and loud’

Hasanthika Sirisena’s Country Surrealism

By Leland Cheuk | April 13, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The author talks about her award-winning collection of short stories, which takes us on a contemporary Sri Lankan’s global journey

The Clouds Followed Us: Two Poems by Hala Alyan

By Hala Alyan | April 12, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘We begged our bodies for / alchemy, death into new lungs, we fed bread / to the jinn’

Only the Clotheslines Knew: Poems by Zeina Hashem Beck

By Zeina Hashem Beck | April 12, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘You’ve memorized its bends like a prayer, / its long silver-gray hair, / its cigarettes, its favorite / songs and curse words, / the holes in its shirts.’

Ochazuke

By Mike Fu | April 8, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘He doubts he has the capacity to uproot himself and start over in a foreign land at this age. But times of war and revolution have a tendency to embolden the meek, to electrify the confident.’

The End of History

By Kristine Sloan | April 5, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘The right to hxstory is the right to know. / I need to know how my mind is theft. / My body is property because my mind is theft. / I say “woman” and I can still move my mouth.’

Hour of the Ox: Poems by Marci Calabretta Cancio-Bello

By Marci Calabretta Cancio-Bello | March 29, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

We graze our fingers through damselfish schools, // but our appetites are as insatiate as the sea is for land. / We gnaw the shore, legs wound in seaweed, / skin flayed by the tongues of clams, pulling, pushing.

Meet AAWW’s 2016 Open City and Margins Fellows

By AAWW | March 25, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Follow the work of these ten writers in our online magazines.

AAWW TV: Remixing Guantanamo Bay

By AAWW | March 23, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Poet Philip Metres talks about why he chose to create an opera from a redacted history of torture

Chinese Dreams: Two Poems by Timothy Yu

By Timothy Yu | March 22, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘At Downtown Crossing // he trail the shoppers, buying nothing, & rub / his rented nose. He know: myself am hell. / His feet unmoved in the snow.’

A Penny Short

By Peter HZ Hsu | March 18, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘I left them both at the wedding reception. The best man was toasting the groom by listing all the women he’d given up for his new bride, and I’d had about enough.’

Each seed a set of rules growing apart: A Poem by Kenji Liu

By Kenji C. Liu | March 15, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘How many times in the dark? A brick for every freedom to hold its dream in. Will the Sun make his own grim entrance?’

Matt Huynh Inks Stories of an Inherited War

By Michelle Chen | March 11, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The artist’s interactive graphic novel adaptation of Nam Le’s “The Boat” is an entry point to a conversation about refugees today

Edge of a Time Zone: Two Poems by Ae Hee Lee

By Ae Hee Lee | March 8, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

You said you were an ant, eyes frozen / on an indigo wave looming over the world. / (You reset every time / you move forward.)

Ghost Forest

By Pik-Shuen Fung | March 4, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘Say, I’m here, Dad, my mom said. I’m here, Dad, I said. You have to say it louder so he can hear you.’

High-Wire Acts: An Interview with Alexander Chee

By Catherine Chung | March 2, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The author of the The Queen of the Night talks about being possessed by a woman who never lived and how writing fiction is all about bringing to life the thing you see that nobody else can

March First Movement: Korean Translations

By Kim Kirim, Im Hwa, and Kim So-wŏl | March 1, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘All the bitter things, one by one, in a rush, / She wants to swallow. Clothed in blueblack scales in a forest of iodine-colored seaweeds, / She wants to be chased by a shark.’

Ashok and Hua Freestyle in a Freezing Greenpoint Park

By Ashok Kondabolu | February 25, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Journalist and music critic Hua Hsu talks to Ashok Kondabolu about the best and worst of his dad’s record collection and how his fascination with rap beef inspired his upcoming book

To an Unknown Passenger

By Phinder Dulai | February 23, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘my hulled hands crash against the tide / to the unloved I will offer / a part of me / in hope my wards will be made complete / for another life’

My Family Was Under Threat

By Meiko Ko | February 19, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘I’m conducting an experiment for escape.’

The Fates: Two Poems by Eddie Kim

By Eddie Kim | February 16, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘There’s a piece of me / that has never been / to this country and another that never left. // I stare at strangers as if they might be friends. // It took three weeks of traveling / before anywhere looked like home.’

Death is a Festival

By Anis Shivani | February 9, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘He knew the genealogies and coats of arms of / all his neighbors, with pride at its right hand and / cruelty at its left’

Foraging

By Aditya Desai | February 5, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

He’d gotten used to the routine of filling out the job applications: name, address, past positions, done. But then came that deadly box, ‘Have you ever been convicted of a crime or felony?’

Bite Hard: Three Poems by Justin Chin (1969-2015)

By Justin Chin | February 2, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘when I am dark/ when I am no more light/ when I am no / more an abomination/ when I am no more shame/ when I am face / again/ when the collective being of me worships god, family, / education and the collective administrative silver spoon, / then I will be back in the fold.’

History Through Invention: Iksaka Banu’s “Farewell to Hindia”

By Iksaka Banu | January 29, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘When the Japanese were in power, I realized that the Dutch East Indies with all of its aristocratic ways, was finished. I must have the guts to say goodbye to it. And whatever fate befalls me, I will remain here.’

Another Kind of Death

By Lillian Kalish | January 28, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

It was just the right and wrong moment to leave, to go to China, to live in a country where the weight of blackness might not hinder your breathing. And yet, there were things you were afraid of losing.

What I Saw Through The Telescope

By Jess X. Chen | January 26, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘We are given a face, / which means we are given / a vessel of blood to call body, / & lungs–that know the alchemy / of altering wind into breath–the way / plants are always transforming / someone’s last words / into oxygen.’

Now Alive, Now Burning: Three Poems by Yuki Tanaka

By Yuki Tanaka | January 19, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘We melted in amnesia, bubbled up / from the ocean, rinsed clean / of appetite, all healed, / all negated, a sequence of two spines / imitating an arrow. A jaguar loved us. / He licked where our hips had been, / and we cucooked in reply.’

Digging a Hole to China

By Michelle Chen | January 15, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

In Huan Hsu’s The Porcelain Thief, the search for a family treasure unearths the spell of nostalgia

Letters for __________you.

By Esther Lee | January 12, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘You brace yourself against the oncoming. But today the sea glistens like the fish you used to scale.’

Line Break Courage and Other Poems by Zhou Sivan

By Zhou Sivan | January 5, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘we need to reinvent the image of tragedy for the nation everyday / or even in the everyday / get incensed or pretend to be so or else there is no exit and no future’

Chopped: Four Sections

By Wo Chan | December 29, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘All your potatoes on the ground—you were never meant for this. The camerawoman tiptoes around spilled tubers as she zooms in on your front teeth, tearing open a parcel of dried shrimp. ‘

Five Boroughs, Seven Killings

By Rishi Nath | December 28, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

New York City through Marlon James’ Booker Prize-winning novel

The Starfruit Tree

By Ashwak Fardoush | December 25, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘Because she had saved my sister once, when my mother tried to pound out the wildness from my sister’s body with both words and sticks, no one ever came to rescue her.’

Flowers of Yarn

By Rowan Hisayo Buchanan | December 16, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

A graphic memoir on ritual and mourning

No Need for the Moon to Shine in It

By Jane Wong | December 15, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘Murder is to mitosis is to mercy. / We are mostly legs too: part tendon, part pardon, kicking / or curling.’

I am a Slave to Narrative

By Melani Budianta and Yvonne Michalik | December 10, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The Indonesian fiction writer Intan Paramaditha on the political potential of horror and writing as a feminist practice

Bad Women: Intan Paramaditha’s “Apple and Knife”

By Intan Paramaditha | December 10, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘In this way, people kept talking about her, and she continued to come to family gatherings. In the eyes of my relatives, she remained a problem that refused to be simplified.’

Solar Maximum: Poems by Sueyeun Juliette Lee

By Sueyeun Juliette Lee | December 8, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘Being alive has again made something new, something that may not be true of justice but is a basic commonplace in evolutionary theory. To forebear is one attitude, rising in an infinite return another.’

Terrorist-ish

By Shymala Dason | December 4, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘Shouldn’t be singing such a song, Ravi knew. But what to do? Inspiration, that was what was happening to him. He couldn’t help it. Had to let it out. He was artist. Couldn’t be always thinking about wars and horrors.’

Returning: Two Poems by Wendy Chin-Tanner

By Wendy Chin-Tanner | December 1, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘If not agates, then barnacles, if not / sweet-smelling seaweed, then shattered shells./ The traveler need not journey on. // If not mussels, then sea glass, if not // smooth surfaces, then rocks pocked by anemones. / The traveler’s journey is one of return.’

Until the Red Runs Out: Two Poems by Muriel Leung

By Muriel Leung | November 24, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘Match lit by a shadow’s curiosity. / Though I was not there for it, I still tasted their meat // and their marrow held a sweetness.’

Lycoris Radiata

By Kou Sugita | November 17, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘Do you hear / the rainfall beating / on cowhide skin / father? It is the life / of autumn, / supernova / booming’

Why I Set My Novel in an Unnamed Country

By Chaitali Sen | November 12, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

An imaginary setting gave me, a child of immigrants, the authority to write about belonging unquestionably to one’s surroundings

Great Object of the Ocean: Poems by B.B.P. Hosmillo

By B.B.P. Hosmillo | November 10, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘Your mouth a little wound with a little reason to be / involved is why alienation is a body part, which moves / you to harshly ask if death really wanted what it wanted, / if its sole duty is to be observed all the time.’

Everyday Islam: Abidah El Khalieqy’s Mataraisa

By Abidah El Khalieqy | November 6, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘But what has happened in our era? If just one vocal daring woman steps forth and speaks of the inequalities of the age and criticizes the establishment, especially those who hold authority, then she is immediately muzzled!’

miki endo as flint marko (a.k.a. sandman)

By Lee Ann Roripaugh | November 3, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘but what if it was something once / vulnerable, downy, and warm? // something severed or stillborn? // something with pulse and blood / and breath bitten right out of it?’

Nonstop Mixing: The Bay Area’s First Filipino Mobile DJ Crew

By Oliver Wang | November 2, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

In the mid-1970s, with a DIY fog machine and light stands made of tire rims, Sound Explosion brought the experience of the discotheque back to garage parties, school dances, and weddings.

Setting a Place

By Rohan Kamicheril | October 28, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Sustainable eating can often feel like the privilege of a well-heeled elite, but how do the appetites and labor of New York City’s immigrant communities fit into the picture?

And If There Was No Country by J. Mae Barizo

By J. Mae Barizo | October 27, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘And they were a solemn people: naming / the world, mapping it out, arguing about what it meant. Clandestine as / husbands’

Bardo

By Muna Gurung | October 23, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘I wonder what happens to skin when it is robbed of touch. Does it break? Does it know to breathe? Does it forget the painful sweetness of a tickle?’

I’m Nature Boy: Two Poems by Albert Saijo

By Albert Saijo | October 13, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“ALL WILL COME BACK FROM ROOTS – NOTHING KILLS BLACKBERRY – BUT WHERE ARE ALL THE SPARROWS”

You are Nothing But a Dog

By Vt Hung | October 9, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“When she began crying, I thought about the rainfall in Viet Nam, how she said it was so heavy a person could hide in it.”

Over the Fields: Two Poems by Angela Peñaredondo

By Angela Peñaredondo | October 6, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘They love long hours of blackout. / They love this snuffed out match / of a little city. To the dust that separates // stained lace. To the poor / thrum of humidity.’

Beaching: Two Poems by Jenna Le

By Jenna Le | September 29, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘The first boy that I dated weighted down his coif / with so much hair gel that the crest atop his pate / was hard as horses’ teeth’

Private Manning by Kazim Ali

By Kazim Ali | September 23, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘On the radio they are playing a record that is skipping. A deep-voiced woman joyfully sings, “My life has just begun– gun– gun–”’

In Memoriam: An Interview with Prashant Bhargava

By Ashok Kondabolu | June 25, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Bhargava, the late director of award-winning film Patang, reminisces about growing up in Chicago and his fascination with India’s festival of kites.

Fred Ho’s Radical Imagination

By Diane Fujino | October 17, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“I fear that we’ll remember Fred’s evocative style, but forget his penetrating political substance.” On remembering what not to forget.

Writing Into Silence

By Bushra Rehman | October 16, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Cathy Linh Che talks about her debut collection of poems, Split, and what it means to mimic flashbacks of war, immigration, and sexual violence.

Jillian Tamaki’s Eileen Fisher Armor

By Anne Ishii | October 9, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The artist and illustrator of Skim and This One Summer talks about the tension of tween-hood, body types in mainstream comics, and why purple is the warmest color.

A GIF Is a Moment’s Monument

By Hossannah Asuncion | September 30, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

An interview with R.A. Villanueva on getting published, what a good GIF and a good poem have in common, and the right way to pronounce GIF

Bavarian Forest

By Humera Afridi | September 13, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Killed by the Gestapo 70 years ago, today, special agent Noorunisa Inayat Khan inspires with messages in code. A reflection and poem.

Michael DeForge Is Not the Weirdo His Characters Are

By Anne Ishii | September 3, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

I interviewed Michael DeForge and all I got was a story about needles in a urethra.

Outside the Margins: Weekly Link Roundup

By AAWW staff | August 22, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Ferguson and readings on anti-black racism, Asian Americans, and complicity

Koyama Press: Saving Artists, One Canadian at a Time

By Anne Ishii | August 19, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Resident comics expert Anne Ishii hangs out with kickass Toronto-based comics publisher Annie Koyama.

Outside the Margins: A Weekly Link Roundup

By AAWW staff | August 15, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Superheroes of color, Arabelle Sicardi, sci-fi films from the global south, Molly Crabapple’s Abu Dhabi, Ferguson, n+1 takes on Tao Lin, and more.

Body Plus Poem

By Yasmin Majeed | August 12, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

An interview with spoken word duo DarkMatter on radical desis, the legacy of Partition, Twitter poems and The Perks of Being a Wallflower

A Hundred Flowers of Revolutionary Hope

By Bill V. Mullen | August 10, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“Fred Ho flooded my ears with essential facts about the history of Afro-Asian political and cultural struggle”

The Ghosts They Carried

By Kitana Ananda | August 6, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Shyam Selvadurai’s latest novel reckons with the violence that haunts the lives of many in post-war Sri Lanka.

(Un)American, (Un)Cool

By Kavita Das | August 4, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

What the marginalization of Asian Americans in an exhibition at the National Portrait Gallery says about the appropriation of “cool.”

Acid House Was Born in a Mumbai Basement

By Ryan Wong | July 31, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

How Bollywood demo musician Charanjit Singh peered into the future of electronic music

A Soundtrack to Ed Lin’s New Novel, Ghost Month

By Ed Lin | July 30, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The sounds of Taipei, from farting mopeds to bustling night markets, unfold through tracks by Joy Division, Asobi Sekksu, Dum Dum Girls and more

Reading Kazim Ali’s Fasting for Ramadan

By Nadia Q. Ahmad | July 25, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“It’s always easier to fast with another person. We feed each other our hunger.”

ABCD: Who Are You Calling Confused?

By Kishwer Vikaas | July 24, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

A look back at the history behind ‘American Born Confused Desi’ and where it’s gone since

Studio Visit: Kelly Zen-Yie Tsai

By Ryan Wong | July 22, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

A group of artists, writers, and musicians led by Kelly Tsai is teaming up to put on a multi-media performance based on the work of Ai Weiwei

A Picture of Us

By Mia Kang | July 16, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Mia Kang interviews filmmaker J.P Chan about his latest film, and casting Asian actors in lead roles

May You Never Find Such Music Again

By Nicole Sealey | July 11, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

A review of Matthew Olzmann’s Mezzanines

Serve the People at the Bottom: Yuri Kochiyama

By Scott Kurashige | July 9, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Yuri’s indefatigable effort to build solidarity among all activists and oppressed people is what many will likely see as the hallmark of her legacy.

An Impossible Present: Five Poets from Nanjing

By Dong Sun | July 2, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

What time and place can call you home? are you an epiphany? a question? / Is it something / you only pretended to welcome, something you’ve come to regret?

Ashok and Mary Talk Chapstick, Hipster Racism, and Korean Names

By Ashok Kondabolu | June 20, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

An interview with writer and former editor-in-chief of Missbehave magazine Mary H.K. Choi

The Dream of Shoji – Poems by Kimiko Hahn

By Kimiko Hahn | June 17, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

How to say milk? How to say sand, snow, sow, / linen, cloud, cocoon, or albino?

Apiology, with Stigma and Other Poems

By Sally Wen Mao | June 13, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

I don’t teach my girls / to brave the violence of sun, sons, or stings. / When resources run out, don’t sit there and behave. / Abandon hive.

There Was Cesar Chavez, and There Was Carlos Bulosan

By Nita Noveno | June 11, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

When Stockton, California was the capital of Filipina/o America. An interview with Dawn Mabalon on the lost history of Filipinos in the organized labor movement, and the stories of women that went untold.

Poems for Tiananmen by Liu Xia and Liao Yiwu

By Liu Xia and Liao Yiwu | June 4, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“Eyes will return tonight / with their ghosts / in the shape of tombstones.” On the 25th anniversary of June 4th, 1989.

Letters to Doc

By Cathy Linh Che | June 3, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

I look up at the trees. / Like me, they have disrobed. / They have disarmed me

25 Years After the Tiananmen Crackdown

By Mel Chin and Bob Lee | June 2, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

In response to the Tiananmen Square protests and crackdown of 1989, the Asian American Arts Centre organized a landmark exhibition of artworks. To commemorate the protest’s 25th anniversary, The Margins partnered with Creative Time Reports to interview the artists involved.

A Cupcake Is Identity As Much As Syntax Is Identity

By Abeer Hoque | May 28, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

A review of Tarfia Faizullah’s debut poetry collection Seam, and an interview with the poet

All The Colors of Life: A Celebration of Fred Ho

By Marie Incontrera | May 21, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“…I was more apprentice than student, and he was more family than friend. Our time together bridged the waters of music and delved into politics, healing, life, and death.”

Beyond Asian American Jazz

By Fred Ho | May 19, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

In 1999, Fred Ho reflected on his political and musical evolution, from the Asian American Movement on.

From Banana to Third World Marxist

By Fred Ho | May 16, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“Spock was good in math and science; so was I. Spock tended to suppress his emotions (his human side), and so did I.” Fred Ho on coming of age.

To Walk the Gauntlet of Fire: Remembering a Mentor

By Kanya D'Almeida | May 14, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

A former student recalls the ups-and-downs of Ho’s cult of personality.

Remembrance/Revolution: A Tribute to Fred Ho

By AAWW | May 14, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Colleagues, collaborators, and friends remember political and musical visionary Fred Ho.

Our Complicity With Excess

By Vijay Iyer | May 7, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

To succeed in America means that at some level you’ve made peace with its rather ugly past. Vijay Iyer’s speech to Yale’s Asian American alumni

Known Unknowns of the Class War

By Naeem Mohaiemen | May 2, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

A review of Zia Haider Rahman’s In the Light of What We Know

Bangladesh: A Thousand Words

By AAWW | April 25, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

In a collection of poetry and prose, writers respond to the work of Bengali photographers exhibited in Eyes on Bangladesh

Munem Wasif: Learning How to Look

By Abeer Hoque | April 16, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Abeer Hoque interviews a celebrated Bangladeshi documentary photographer whose work recently made its way to an exhibit in New York City

A Global Jim Crow

By Vijay Prashad | April 15, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Vijay Prashad at the Brecht Forum. Plus, how Kumar Goshal (1899-1971) carved out a theory of US imperialism in the African American press.

The Bodyguard

By Tom Cho | April 14, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“Someone is stalking Whitney Houston and I have been hired to be her bodyguard”—an excerpt from Tom Cho’s Look Who’s Morphing

The Swamp of this Moment

By Jyothi Natarajan | April 11, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

An interview with Akhil Sharma, author of Family Life, on how to write a novel that has no plot, literary modernism’s influence, and remembering India

Brother-life by Akhil Sharma

By Akhil Sharma | April 7, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“While a part of me was glad I wasn’t like my brother, no part of me wished to be more fortunate than my mother.”

A Coolie Woman’s Work is Never Done

By Annie Paul | March 31, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Gaiutra Bahadur unearths buried stories of indenture—those of women who battled rigid patriarchy on either side of the black water.

First Days in Radical America

By Vijay Prashad | March 18, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Lessons on how life in the US was worth much more if spent in solidarity with those who suffer at its heel

Break the Silence

By Aziz Rana | March 18, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Cultural critic Vijay Prashad and legal scholar Aziz Rana discuss the legacy of multiculturalism, and what’s left of third-world solidarities.

Studio Visit: Eugenia Kim

By Eugenia Kim | March 14, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

With the novelist who long thought she was a Korean American impostor

Studio Visit: Marie Mockett

By Marie Mockett | March 7, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The author of Picking Bones from Ash on Japanese Buddhism, tsunami survivors, and her trip into the “exclusion zone”

Yellow Peril: 19th-Century Scapegoating

By John Kuo Wei Tchen and Dylan Yeats | March 5, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

How fear of the “the mob” turned into racial exclusion. Excerpts from a recently published archive of anti-Asian fear

Ashok and Randall Park Celebrate Father’s Day

By Ashok Kondabolu | July 26, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Actor, writer, and father Randall Park shares an hour on the phone with Ashok Kondabolu, recalling his childhood in LA and how he stumbled into acting.

Ashok and Annie Hit the Backyard

By Ashok Kondabolu | April 23, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Ashok Kondabolu of Das Racist catches up with documentary photographer Annie Ling at her Brooklyn apartment.

Dennis Hopper Estate Sale: “Chinese” Warrior. Hey man, he’s Japanese, man.

By Anne Ishii | February 25, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Easy Rider and recently deceased Dennis Hopper apparently had a collection of “Chinese” warrior prints that went up for bidding. Except that the warrior is not Chinese… or a warrior…

The Skin I’m In

By Naeem Mohaiemen | February 20, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Scholar Vivek Bald chronicles an early lost history of a time of Black-Bengali racial solidarity

Straddling Convention: The Erotic in Asian American Poetry

By Ocean Vuong | February 14, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Ocean Vuong, in search of the “new erotic,” guest-curates a portfolio of poems in time for Valentine’s Day.

Monday Clicks: Lunar New Year, Celine Dion and Other Forms of “Poetry”

By Anne Ishii | February 11, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Link-bait for the Monday-challenged.

Letter From a Hotel Room in Centum City

By Alex Jung | February 7, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“I logged onto the Internet and searched for others like me. I never found them, but I invited them over to my hotel room anyway.”

Zany, Cute, Interesting: Sianne Ngai on Our Aesthetic Categories

By Sianne Ngai | February 7, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“The commodity aesthetic of cuteness, the discursive aesthetic of the interesting, and the performative aesthetic of zaniness help us get at some of the most important social dynamics underlying life in late capitalist society today.”

Minority Rules: 2050, According to Jeff Ng

By Jeff Ng | February 5, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

In three decades, the United States will have a “majority-minority” population. We asked four artists to consider this demographic shift. Sharing his vision of 2050 is Jeff Ng, a designer better known as jeffstaple and the founder of Staple Design.

Minority Rules: 2050, According to Jaret Vadera

By Jaret Vadera | January 31, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

In three decades, the United States will have a “majority-minority” population. We asked four artists to consider this demographic shift. Here is Jaret Vadera, an interdisciplinary artist based in New York and interested in the hidden structures of power.

Superman Versus Yellow-face

By Anne Ishii | January 30, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Remember those “Asian thug” villains from the earliest Detective Comics?

Fresh Off the Boat, Fresh Off the Shelf: Eddie Huang at B&N Tonight

By | January 29, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Baohaus bad boy and Workshop board member Eddie Huang reads from his new memoir tonight. Where will you be?

Monday Clicks: Trained Monkeys, Sylvia Plath as Chick Lit, “Racist” Kodak Film

By Anne Ishii | January 28, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Link bait for the Monday-challenged.

The Children of 1965

By Min Song | January 24, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

In an excerpt from a forthcoming book, English professor Min Song reflects on undergraduate “Great Books” courses, the Helen Vendler-Rita Dove debate, and the first time he read a Siu Sin Far story.

Unacceptable Suffering: Rey Chow on Michael Haneke and Pornography

By Jennifer Pan | January 24, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Cultural critic Rey Chow discusses her new book—including how the acclaimed Austrian filmmaker’s “staging of the extreme” gestures toward the pornographic.

Minority Rules: 2050, According to An Xiao Mina

By An Xiao Mina | January 23, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

In three decades, the United States will have a “majority-minority” population. We asked four artists to consider this demographic shift. First up is An Xiao Mina, a designer and artist who focuses on the role of technology in building communities.

Scattered Sand: China’s Migrant Workers Get a Voice

By RYAN WONG | January 9, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

An interview with journalist Hsiao-Hung Pai, whose book Scattered Sand tells the stories of Chinese migrant workers—direct from their mouths.

Happy Controversy: Danish Ali and Ali Gul Pir on Their First US Comedy Tour

By Jen Kwok | December 12, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The two comics chat with fellow comedian Jen Kwok about emergency generators, censorship, and the most-viewed YouTube video in Pakistan.

Excerpt: Lament in the Night

By Shōson Nagahara | December 6, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Originally published in Japanese in 1925, this naturalist noir masterpiece follows itinerant day laborer Ishikawa Sazuko as he prowls the back alleys of Los Angeles, looking for a meal, a job, or just some companionship. With an introduction by translator Andrew Leong.

Writing Tips: “Acquire a cat.”

By Emma Straub | December 3, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Emma Straub, author of Laura Lamont’s Life in Pictures, on why a feline companion might make you a better writer.

Writing Tips: “Focus on the things you can control.”

By Catherine Chung | December 3, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Advice from Catherine Chung, a fiction editor at Guernica and author of Forgotten Country.

Speaker in a Future Age: Ed Bok Lee on Poetry, Places and the Death of Tongues

By Sueyeun Juliette Lee | November 28, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“I have a mole on the bottom of my foot, and some of my more superstitious relatives told me that if you have a mole on the sole of one foot, you’ll always yearn to visit new places more than most.”

Live From East Shore: Xia Jia, Jazz Heavyweight

By Terry Hsieh | November 28, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“Stay with the music, that’s all it’s about anyways.” A night with legendary Chinese jazz pianist Xia Jia.

Writing Tips: “Style without story is an empty suit.”

By Alexander Chee | November 20, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Whiting Award-winner Alexander Chee on post-its, the virtues of retyping, and committing to the process.

Spiritual Suicide in Pema Tseden’s Contemporary Tibet

By Tingting Wei | November 14, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The director’s slow-moving films about Tibetan life may feel like documentaries, but according to him, they aren’t.

Meet Hualing Nieh, Mo Yan’s “Literary Mother”

By Jeff Tompkins | November 9, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Orhan Pamuk and Mo Yan, Noble Prize winners in Literature, were both writers-in-residence at the prestigious International Writing Program. An interview with IWP’s current director about one of the program’s founders, the remarkable Chinese novelist Hualing Nieh.

I Am Your Mirror: O Zhang’s Blank, Visionary Billboards

By Gaiutra Bahadur | November 7, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Following in the footsteps of Dorothea Lange, who photographed stoic, suffering faces during the Depression, the Chinese-born artist traveled across recession-worn America, capturing a different sort of face.

Red-Cooked Meat and Table Manners: Decoding How to Cook and Eat in Chinese

By Phyllis Fong | November 7, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Buwei Yang Chao’s famed 1945 cookbook helped coined the phrase “stir-fry.” “Wrapling” and “rambling,” her words for the simple and ruffle-edged dumplings, were less successful.

Cobra Notes for Ban

By Bhanu Kapil | October 17, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“I want a literature that is not made from literature.”

Long Live Emoji (´•ω•`)

By Anne Ishii | October 9, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Make no mistake, the pinnacle of all graphic notation is emoji.

Ashok and Amrit Go to the Movies

By Ashok Kondabolu | October 8, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Stereogum editor Amrit Singh has a hang with Das Racist hypeman Ashok Kondabolu. Proper nouns mentioned: George Washington, Britney Spears, Jenny Slate (a.k.a. the “Marcel the Shell” girl), and C. Mohan (Bollywood’s most iconic designer).

A (2012) Midsummer History Lesson

By Negin Farsad | October 5, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

It’s the year 2352, and the Walrusoids are at it again, speculating over divorce, SB 1070, some tall Asian guy named Jeremy Lin, and movie theater masturbation.

The Occasional Writer: An Interview with Science Fiction Author Ted Chiang

By Vandana Singh | October 3, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Fellow sci-fi writer Vandana Singh quizzes the award-winning, short-fiction master on his axiomatic approaches, paradigm shifts, and whether he would ever own a digient.

EXCERPT: The Story of My Assassins

By Tarun Tejpal | September 27, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“Our Mordor was the same. Our Frankenstein was the same. Our Tinker Bell was the same. We didn’t have to imagine Davy Jones—a graphics company in Silicon Valley was manufacturing him for us. We all picked our visuals from the universal pool. The individual monster was dead.”

Fear Itself: The Hysterics of Death by China

By Ryan Lee Wong | September 25, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

An alarming new documentary blames China for America’s woes.

Rogue State: Jeff Biggers on the Arizonification of America

By Michelle Chen | September 20, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

In an interview about his new book, State Out of the Union, author Jeff Biggers examines Arizona, the so-called “meth lab of democracy,” and the rogue state’s cycles of repression and resistance.

From Laundromats to Radiolab: Jad Abumrad Peers into Thao Nguyen’s Old Soul

By Jad Abumrad | September 19, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“The first real song I wrote was a book report for Lord of the Flies.”

YA Fiction and Issues that Aren’t Fictitious: A Q&A with Adaptation Author Malinda Lo

By Phyllis Fong | September 18, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“I absolutely did not set out to write a lesbian Cinderella. It wasn’t the story I intended to tell, so it took me a while to come around to the idea of telling it.”

Catch Me Online: The Dead Do Not Improve’s Jay Caspian Kang

By Hua Hsu | September 14, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The journalist and debut fiction writer chats with fellow Grantland writer Hua Hsu about his new neo-noir novel, grading papers, and Duck Down videos.

Ashok and Anil Go to the Cafe

By Ashok Kondabolu | September 11, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Ashok Kondabolu of Das Racist interviews Anil Dash, the blogger and technologist, at Financier Patisserie, near Astor Place.

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