Articles in the Everything Category
124 Results

A Picture of Us

By Mia Kang | July 16, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Mia Kang interviews filmmaker J.P Chan about his latest film, and casting Asian actors in lead roles

May You Never Find Such Music Again

By Nicole Sealey | July 11, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

A review of Matthew Olzmann’s Mezzanines

Serve the People at the Bottom: Yuri Kochiyama

By Scott Kurashige | July 9, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Yuri’s indefatigable effort to build solidarity among all activists and oppressed people is what many will likely see as the hallmark of her legacy.

An Impossible Present: Five Poets from Nanjing

By Dong Sun | July 2, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

What time and place can call you home? are you an epiphany? a question? / Is it something / you only pretended to welcome, something you’ve come to regret?

Ashok and Mary Talk Chapstick, Hipster Racism, and Korean Names

By Ashok Kondabolu | June 20, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

An interview with writer and former editor-in-chief of Missbehave magazine Mary H.K. Choi

The Dream of Shoji – Poems by Kimiko Hahn

By Kimiko Hahn | June 17, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

How to say milk? How to say sand, snow, sow, / linen, cloud, cocoon, or albino?

Apiology, with Stigma and Other Poems

By Sally Wen Mao | June 13, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

I don’t teach my girls / to brave the violence of sun, sons, or stings. / When resources run out, don’t sit there and behave. / Abandon hive.

There Was Cesar Chavez, and There Was Carlos Bulosan

By Nita Noveno | June 11, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

When Stockton, California was the capital of Filipina/o America. An interview with Dawn Mabalon on the lost history of Filipinos in the organized labor movement, and the stories of women that went untold.

Poems for Tiananmen by Liu Xia and Liao Yiwu

By Liu Xia and Liao Yiwu | June 4, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“Eyes will return tonight / with their ghosts / in the shape of tombstones.” On the 25th anniversary of June 4th, 1989.

Letters to Doc

By Cathy Linh Che | June 3, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

I look up at the trees. / Like me, they have disrobed. / They have disarmed me

25 Years After the Tiananmen Crackdown

By Mel Chin and Bob Lee | June 2, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

In response to the Tiananmen Square protests and crackdown of 1989, the Asian American Arts Centre organized a landmark exhibition of artworks. To commemorate the protest’s 25th anniversary, The Margins partnered with Creative Time Reports to interview the artists involved.

A Cupcake Is Identity As Much As Syntax Is Identity

By Abeer Hoque | May 28, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

A review of Tarfia Faizullah’s debut poetry collection Seam, and an interview with the poet

All The Colors of Life: A Celebration of Fred Ho

By Marie Incontrera | May 21, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“…I was more apprentice than student, and he was more family than friend. Our time together bridged the waters of music and delved into politics, healing, life, and death.”

Beyond Asian American Jazz

By Fred Ho | May 19, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

In 1999, Fred Ho reflected on his political and musical evolution, from the Asian American Movement on.

From Banana to Third World Marxist

By Fred Ho | May 16, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“Spock was good in math and science; so was I. Spock tended to suppress his emotions (his human side), and so did I.” Fred Ho on coming of age.

To Walk the Gauntlet of Fire: Remembering a Mentor

By Kanya D'Almeida | May 14, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

A former student recalls the ups-and-downs of Ho’s cult of personality.

Remembrance/Revolution: A Tribute to Fred Ho

By AAWW | May 14, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Colleagues, collaborators, and friends remember political and musical visionary Fred Ho.

Our Complicity With Excess

By Vijay Iyer | May 7, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

To succeed in America means that at some level you’ve made peace with its rather ugly past. Vijay Iyer’s speech to Yale’s Asian American alumni

Known Unknowns of the Class War

By Naeem Mohaiemen | May 2, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

A review of Zia Haider Rahman’s In the Light of What We Know

Bangladesh: A Thousand Words

By AAWW | April 25, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

In a collection of poetry and prose, writers respond to the work of Bengali photographers exhibited in Eyes on Bangladesh

Munem Wasif: Learning How to Look

By Abeer Hoque | April 16, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Abeer Hoque interviews a celebrated Bangladeshi documentary photographer whose work recently made its way to an exhibit in New York City

A Global Jim Crow

By Vijay Prashad | April 15, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Vijay Prashad at the Brecht Forum. Plus, how Kumar Goshal (1899-1971) carved out a theory of US imperialism in the African American press.

The Bodyguard

By Tom Cho | April 14, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“Someone is stalking Whitney Houston and I have been hired to be her bodyguard”—an excerpt from Tom Cho’s Look Who’s Morphing

The Swamp of this Moment

By Jyothi Natarajan | April 11, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

An interview with Akhil Sharma, author of Family Life, on how to write a novel that has no plot, literary modernism’s influence, and remembering India

Brother-life by Akhil Sharma

By Akhil Sharma | April 7, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“While a part of me was glad I wasn’t like my brother, no part of me wished to be more fortunate than my mother.”

A Coolie Woman’s Work is Never Done

By Annie Paul | March 31, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Gaiutra Bahadur unearths buried stories of indenture—those of women who battled rigid patriarchy on either side of the black water.

First Days in Radical America

By Vijay Prashad | March 18, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Lessons on how life in the US was worth much more if spent in solidarity with those who suffer at its heel

Break the Silence

By Aziz Rana | March 18, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Cultural critic Vijay Prashad and legal scholar Aziz Rana discuss the legacy of multiculturalism, and what’s left of third-world solidarities.

Studio Visit: Eugenia Kim

By Eugenia Kim | March 14, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

With the novelist who long thought she was a Korean American impostor

Studio Visit: Marie Mockett

By Marie Mockett | March 7, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The author of Picking Bones from Ash on Japanese Buddhism, tsunami survivors, and her trip into the “exclusion zone”

Yellow Peril: 19th-Century Scapegoating

By John Kuo Wei Tchen and Dylan Yeats | March 5, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

How fear of the “the mob” turned into racial exclusion. Excerpts from a recently published archive of anti-Asian fear

Ashok and Randall Park Celebrate Father’s Day

By Ashok Kondabolu | July 26, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Actor, writer, and father Randall Park shares an hour on the phone with Ashok Kondabolu, recalling his childhood in LA and how he stumbled into acting.

Ashok and Annie Hit the Backyard

By Ashok Kondabolu | April 23, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Ashok Kondabolu of Das Racist catches up with documentary photographer Annie Ling at her Brooklyn apartment.

Dennis Hopper Estate Sale: “Chinese” Warrior. Hey man, he’s Japanese, man.

By Anne Ishii | February 25, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Easy Rider and recently deceased Dennis Hopper apparently had a collection of “Chinese” warrior prints that went up for bidding. Except that the warrior is not Chinese… or a warrior…

The Skin I’m In

By Naeem Mohaiemen | February 20, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Scholar Vivek Bald chronicles an early lost history of a time of Black-Bengali racial solidarity

Straddling Convention: The Erotic in Asian American Poetry

By Ocean Vuong | February 14, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Ocean Vuong, in search of the “new erotic,” guest-curates a portfolio of poems in time for Valentine’s Day.

Monday Clicks: Lunar New Year, Celine Dion and Other Forms of “Poetry”

By Anne Ishii | February 11, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Link-bait for the Monday-challenged.

Letter From a Hotel Room in Centum City

By Alex Jung | February 7, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“I logged onto the Internet and searched for others like me. I never found them, but I invited them over to my hotel room anyway.”

Zany, Cute, Interesting: Sianne Ngai on Our Aesthetic Categories

By Sianne Ngai | February 7, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“The commodity aesthetic of cuteness, the discursive aesthetic of the interesting, and the performative aesthetic of zaniness help us get at some of the most important social dynamics underlying life in late capitalist society today.”

Minority Rules: 2050, According to Jeff Ng

By Jeff Ng | February 5, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

In three decades, the United States will have a “majority-minority” population. We asked four artists to consider this demographic shift. Sharing his vision of 2050 is Jeff Ng, a designer better known as jeffstaple and the founder of Staple Design.

Minority Rules: 2050, According to Jaret Vadera

By Jaret Vadera | January 31, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

In three decades, the United States will have a “majority-minority” population. We asked four artists to consider this demographic shift. Here is Jaret Vadera, an interdisciplinary artist based in New York and interested in the hidden structures of power.

Superman Versus Yellow-face

By Anne Ishii | January 30, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Remember those “Asian thug” villains from the earliest Detective Comics?

Fresh Off the Boat, Fresh Off the Shelf: Eddie Huang at B&N Tonight

By | January 29, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Baohaus bad boy and Workshop board member Eddie Huang reads from his new memoir tonight. Where will you be?

Monday Clicks: Trained Monkeys, Sylvia Plath as Chick Lit, “Racist” Kodak Film

By Anne Ishii | January 28, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Link bait for the Monday-challenged.

The Children of 1965

By Min Song | January 24, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

In an excerpt from a forthcoming book, English professor Min Song reflects on undergraduate “Great Books” courses, the Helen Vendler-Rita Dove debate, and the first time he read a Siu Sin Far story.

Unacceptable Suffering: Rey Chow on Michael Haneke and Pornography

By Jennifer Pan | January 24, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Cultural critic Rey Chow discusses her new book—including how the acclaimed Austrian filmmaker’s “staging of the extreme” gestures toward the pornographic.

Minority Rules: 2050, According to An Xiao Mina

By An Xiao Mina | January 23, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

In three decades, the United States will have a “majority-minority” population. We asked four artists to consider this demographic shift. First up is An Xiao Mina, a designer and artist who focuses on the role of technology in building communities.

Scattered Sand: China’s Migrant Workers Get a Voice

By RYAN WONG | January 9, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

An interview with journalist Hsiao-Hung Pai, whose book Scattered Sand tells the stories of Chinese migrant workers—direct from their mouths.

Happy Controversy: Danish Ali and Ali Gul Pir on Their First US Comedy Tour

By Jen Kwok | December 12, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The two comics chat with fellow comedian Jen Kwok about emergency generators, censorship, and the most-viewed YouTube video in Pakistan.

Excerpt: Lament in the Night

By Shōson Nagahara | December 6, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Originally published in Japanese in 1925, this naturalist noir masterpiece follows itinerant day laborer Ishikawa Sazuko as he prowls the back alleys of Los Angeles, looking for a meal, a job, or just some companionship. With an introduction by translator Andrew Leong.

Writing Tips: “Acquire a cat.”

By Emma Straub | December 3, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Emma Straub, author of Laura Lamont’s Life in Pictures, on why a feline companion might make you a better writer.

Writing Tips: “Focus on the things you can control.”

By Catherine Chung | December 3, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Advice from Catherine Chung, a fiction editor at Guernica and author of Forgotten Country.

Speaker in a Future Age: Ed Bok Lee on Poetry, Places and the Death of Tongues

By Sueyeun Juliette Lee | November 28, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“I have a mole on the bottom of my foot, and some of my more superstitious relatives told me that if you have a mole on the sole of one foot, you’ll always yearn to visit new places more than most.”

Live From East Shore: Xia Jia, Jazz Heavyweight

By Terry Hsieh | November 28, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“Stay with the music, that’s all it’s about anyways.” A night with legendary Chinese jazz pianist Xia Jia.

Writing Tips: “Style without story is an empty suit.”

By Alexander Chee | November 20, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Whiting Award-winner Alexander Chee on post-its, the virtues of retyping, and committing to the process.

Spiritual Suicide in Pema Tseden’s Contemporary Tibet

By Tingting Wei | November 14, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The director’s slow-moving films about Tibetan life may feel like documentaries, but according to him, they aren’t.

Meet Hualing Nieh, Mo Yan’s “Literary Mother”

By Jeff Tompkins | November 9, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Orhan Pamuk and Mo Yan, Noble Prize winners in Literature, were both writers-in-residence at the prestigious International Writing Program. An interview with IWP’s current director about one of the program’s founders, the remarkable Chinese novelist Hualing Nieh.

I Am Your Mirror: O Zhang’s Blank, Visionary Billboards

By Gaiutra Bahadur | November 7, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Following in the footsteps of Dorothea Lange, who photographed stoic, suffering faces during the Depression, the Chinese-born artist traveled across recession-worn America, capturing a different sort of face.

Red-Cooked Meat and Table Manners: Decoding How to Cook and Eat in Chinese

By Phyllis Fong | November 7, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Buwei Yang Chao’s famed 1945 cookbook helped coined the phrase “stir-fry.” “Wrapling” and “rambling,” her words for the simple and ruffle-edged dumplings, were less successful.

Cobra Notes for Ban

By Bhanu Kapil | October 17, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“I want a literature that is not made from literature.”

Long Live Emoji (´•ω•`)

By Anne Ishii | October 9, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Make no mistake, the pinnacle of all graphic notation is emoji.

Ashok and Amrit Go to the Movies

By Ashok Kondabolu | October 8, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Stereogum editor Amrit Singh has a hang with Das Racist hypeman Ashok Kondabolu. Proper nouns mentioned: George Washington, Britney Spears, Jenny Slate (a.k.a. the “Marcel the Shell” girl), and C. Mohan (Bollywood’s most iconic designer).

A (2012) Midsummer History Lesson

By Negin Farsad | October 5, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

It’s the year 2352, and the Walrusoids are at it again, speculating over divorce, SB 1070, some tall Asian guy named Jeremy Lin, and movie theater masturbation.

The Occasional Writer: An Interview with Science Fiction Author Ted Chiang

By Vandana Singh | October 3, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Fellow sci-fi writer Vandana Singh quizzes the award-winning, short-fiction master on his axiomatic approaches, paradigm shifts, and whether he would ever own a digient.

EXCERPT: The Story of My Assassins

By Tarun Tejpal | September 27, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“Our Mordor was the same. Our Frankenstein was the same. Our Tinker Bell was the same. We didn’t have to imagine Davy Jones—a graphics company in Silicon Valley was manufacturing him for us. We all picked our visuals from the universal pool. The individual monster was dead.”

Fear Itself: The Hysterics of Death by China

By Ryan Lee Wong | September 25, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

An alarming new documentary blames China for America’s woes.

Rogue State: Jeff Biggers on the Arizonification of America

By Michelle Chen | September 20, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

In an interview about his new book, State Out of the Union, author Jeff Biggers examines Arizona, the so-called “meth lab of democracy,” and the rogue state’s cycles of repression and resistance.

From Laundromats to Radiolab: Jad Abumrad Peers into Thao Nguyen’s Old Soul

By Jad Abumrad | September 19, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“The first real song I wrote was a book report for Lord of the Flies.”

YA Fiction and Issues that Aren’t Fictitious: A Q&A with Adaptation Author Malinda Lo

By Phyllis Fong | September 18, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“I absolutely did not set out to write a lesbian Cinderella. It wasn’t the story I intended to tell, so it took me a while to come around to the idea of telling it.”

Catch Me Online: The Dead Do Not Improve’s Jay Caspian Kang

By Hua Hsu | September 14, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The journalist and debut fiction writer chats with fellow Grantland writer Hua Hsu about his new neo-noir novel, grading papers, and Duck Down videos.

Ashok and Anil Go to the Cafe

By Ashok Kondabolu | September 11, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Ashok Kondabolu of Das Racist interviews Anil Dash, the blogger and technologist, at Financier Patisserie, near Astor Place.

Excerpt: Qiu Miaojin’s Notes of a CrocodileFic

By Qiu Miaojin | September 5, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Qiu Miaojin—one of the first openly lesbian writers in ’90s post-martial-law Taiwan—committed suicide at the age of 26. What follows is an excerpt from her “survival manual” for a younger generation. With an introduction by translator Bonnie Huie.

The Ghosts of Omonia Square

By Ranbir Sidhu | August 29, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

In Athens, an historic square and neighborhood now home to porno theaters, sex stores, and “café” brothels, is alive with immigrants—until it isn’t.

Muslim Self-Portraits (and Accusations) at Heart Mountain

By Hana Maruyama | August 22, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

At the Japanese American internment camp site, an art exhibit featuring photographs of Muslims has been the subject of complaints.

Nonsense Made Sense: The Downside Up World of Stephen Chow

By La Frances Hui | August 16, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The veteran comedian, actor and director was the epitome of Hong Kong’s ’90s-era mo lei tau subculture.

What’s the best pitch you’ve ever gotten?

By Agony Agent | August 16, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Our mystery veteran agents answer your questions about the book industry.

Zen Fishing, or What You Catch Can Catch You, Too

By Luis H. Francia | August 14, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Poet and journalist Luis H. Francia journeys through Japan, bearing witness to the devastation wrought by the 2011 earthquake and tsunami—and to the creativity arising from these very areas.

London Olympics, 1948: Her Name Meant Double Victory

By Hana Maruyama | August 10, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Diver Vicki Manalo Draves won two gold medals in rations-enforced London. To celebrate, she ate horse.

Near To The Alien: Katie Kitamura on Gone To The Forest

By Hermione Hoby | August 7, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Kitamura chats with Hermione Hoby about her new novel, a “collage of colonialism.”

What I Have Learned About the World from Books, and What the World Could Stand to Learn from the Shooting at the Sikh Temple

By Matthew Salesses | August 7, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Matthew Salesses on the power of words and appearances.

Hello World: How Nike Sold Tiger Woods

By Hiram Perez | August 2, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

How did a multinational corporation like Nike appeal to diverse markets without violating the principle of colorblindness that became increasingly and insidiously sacrosanct in the U.S. in the 1990s? A deconstruction of two infamous Tiger Woods ads sheds some light.

Cindy Sherman Plays Wolf (To Nikki S. Lee’s Chameleon)

By Sylvia Kwon | August 1, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

How do you get from Cindy Sherman, to Nikki S. Lee, and back?

Ching-In Chen: Zuihitsu to An Earlier Self

By Hana Maruyama | July 25, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Queer poet Ching-In Chen’s letter to her younger self procures its epistolary strength from the loosely connected ideas of the zuihitsu.

WATCH: Junot Diaz and Min Jin Lee on Writer Origins

By Lali Foster | July 25, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“They say to write something new you’ve got to be lost.” An excerpted video conversation featuring the Pulitzer Prize winner and the author of Free Food for Millionaires.

Ashok and Sheng Go on the Kiddie Ride

By Ashok Kondabolu | July 19, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Part two of an epic conversation between Ashok Kondabolu of Das Racist and Comedy Central comedian Sheng Wang.

Tsai Ming-Liang’s Wayward Boundaries

By Jennifer Pan | July 18, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Can a movie that explicitly demonstrates the darkest grotesqueries of pornography actually function as a refusal to condemn it? Tsai Ming-Liang’s The Wayward Cloud hints at this possibility.

Here We Are Becoming Champs

By Melissa Chadburn | July 17, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“Pacquiao became the second man in boxing history to win world titles in six different weight divisions. There he was: our uncle, our Tito, our brother, our kuya.”

Mountain Brothers: Winning Voices

By Oliver Wang | July 16, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“Since their submission was purely auditory, no one at Sprite realized they were Asian American.”

Excerpt: Gun Dealers’ Daughter

By Gina Apostol | July 16, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“My father’s warehouse was close to the decayed parts of the harbor, which rambled on into the slums built by smugglers and sailors.”

Sea Salty: The Man and the Crab

By Harley Spiller | July 13, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Former Marine mess cook John Gun Pin knew how to handle a cleaver. Harley Spiller (a.k.a. Inspector Collector) remembers his old friend, and the last dish he prepared: cured crab, or ha cha.

Ashok and Sheng Take Cover

By Ashok Kondabolu | July 12, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

In the first installment of his interview column, “The Cornering,” Ashok Kondabolu of Das Racist chats it up with Comedy Central comedian Sheng Wang. They also traipse the streets of Chinatown. Look out for part deux of this interview next week.

Rewatching A Beijinger in New York

By Ying Li | July 12, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Ying Li talks to her novelist mother, Lin Chang, about the first Chinese-language TV show to be shot in the United States.

Chasing Down the #Ghandifoul

By Siddhartha Mitter | July 11, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

A new Twitter feed goes after those who commit the common crime of misspelling Mahatma Gandhi’s last name.

R.I.P. Isuzu Yamada

By Anne Ishii | July 10, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The Tokyo New Wave actress featured brilliantly in films by Ozu, Mizoguchi, and Kurosawa.

Behind This Photo Is a Woman Crying

By Melissa Chadburn | July 10, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

A writer joins a protest against a proposed Walmart in L.A.’s Chinatown.

Bands of Brothers

By Oliver Wang | July 2, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Over the course of the ’90s, Filipino American scratch crews transformed the realm of hip-hop DJing.

Timothy McVeigh and our “Buried History”

By Manan Ahmed | June 27, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

On the domestic terror of the 1990s, and avoiding cultural amnesia.

Xu Xi is my name.

By Ken Chen | June 27, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The transnational writer dishes about Law and Order, her favorite drinks, and less-than-romantic writing habits.

Party with DREAMer Julio Salgado at our Launch Celebration

By AAWW Staff | June 27, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

A round-up of articles, interviews and videos featuring Salgado, who was recently among the first undocumented immigrants to be featured on the cover of TIME magazine. The artist and activist will be screenprinting at AAWW’s launch party tonight.

When Your Video Game Gets You Branded a Spy

By Anne Ishii | June 25, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

A former Rockstar Games developer’s new project about the Iranian Revolution has gotten him labeled a spy.

Danny Boyle’s Eighty-Six Flavors

By Siddhartha Mitter | June 25, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop
Tags:

The leaked playlist for the London Olympics opening ceremony is almost absurdly eclectic, and includes the bhangra track, “Nachna Onda Nei.”

Contest: Hao Nao, Gaokao?

By AAWW Staff | June 22, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Compared to China’s national university entrance exam, the gaokao (lit., “test you must ace or work as a menial laborer for the rest of your life”), the SATs are a stroll in the park.

Rescripting Armageddon in Tropic of Orange

By Warren Liu | June 19, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Karen Tei Yamashita’s novel of a dystopic ’90s L.A. tangles with both disasters and distractions.

Tailor-Made: Hollywood Tries to Suit China

By Shining Li and Katherine Zhang | June 19, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

But the media bungles it up with an overly simplistic “Red China” narrative.

The Writing on the Shirt: Nirvana and the Politics of Selling Out

By Hua Hsu | June 19, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

A Grantland writer and Nirvana fan ponders the quintessential ’90s question.

How soon can I write my memoir?

By Agony Agent | June 18, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The inaugural installment of our publishing advice column. Send our Agony Agents your most pressing book industry questions!

With Grain: A Q&A with Apichatpong Weerasethakul

By Katie Kitamura | June 15, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The acclaimed Thai filmmaker sits down with novelist Katie Kitamura for a conversation about narrative vs. storytelling, black magic, and migrant populations.

Magic Mediation: Wu-Tang’s Kung Fu Zeal

By Sophia Chang | June 13, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

An up-close and personal take on the hip-hop group’s love of kung fu.

Nick Carter: Killmaster, Yogi, Lover.

By Anne Ishii | June 13, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Spy novels as Asian kitsch.

Stay Sassy

By Jamia Wilson | June 12, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

A love letter to the magazine that defined a generation.

Class of 1997

By Oliver Wang | June 12, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

It was a banner year for Asian American narrative films.

Takeshi Miyakawa’s “Arresting” Creations

By Katherine Zhang | June 11, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The artist’s plastic-bag installations caught the attention of the NYPD.

Tania James doesn’t want to read your mind.

By Ken Chen | June 11, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The Aerogrammes author chats about her preferred superpower and her love of Norton Anthologies.

History Lessons, Walrusoid Style

By Negin Farsad | June 11, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

In the year 2352, they scratch their heads over Instagram, Mitt Romney, Kony, and Siri.

WATCH: Celebrating the Lifetime Achievements of Jessica Hagedorn at PageTurner 2011

By Jessica Wang | June 9, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Ma-Yi Theater Company pays tribute to Jessica Hagedorn with a special performance.

Don Lee on how to smooth out your jibes. A Q&A.

By Ken Chen | June 8, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The author of The Collective chats with AAWW executive director Ken Chen about windsurfing, his writing chair, and the best way to eat eggs.

Born in the U.S.A.: Cornershop’s “Brimful of Asha”

By Manan Desai | June 7, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The British desi band’s kitschy, three-chord hit appeared on episodes of Friends and in a Gap commercial.

Idées Vagues, Images Claires

By Anne Ishii | June 7, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

On rural Chinese costume jewelry, and eerily quiet portraits.

Asian Chic

By Thuy Linh Tu | June 6, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The ‘90s saw Western designers outsourcing not just manufacturing, but inspiration, to Asia.

“Where is your ‘White literature’ section?”

By Amitava Kumar | June 4, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Author, professor, and provocateur Amitava Kumar has a very specific question for New York City book clerks.

The Revolution of Word Sound Power

By Siddhartha Mitter | June 3, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Delhi-based reggae MC Taru Dalmia travels to villages in India to record songs that speak truth to power.

Rihanna’s Orientalist Turn

By Katherine Zhang | June 3, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The singer stars in Coldplay’s perplexing (and embarrassing) “Princess of China” music video.

Pen and Paper. . . on Paper

By Anne Ishii | June 3, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

In Japan, stationery magazines repopulate like bunnies.

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