Media Gallery

This was the last week for many of our summer 2015 interns at the Workshop (We miss you all!). Thankfully, they left us with some great links for this week’s Link Roundup. Enjoy!



Professor Jennifer Lee “debunks” the “model minority myth” in an interview about her book The Asian American Achievement Paradox. She delves deeper into immigrants’ processes of assimilation to American culture, factoring in the “starting points” for immigrant families. Though this stereotype still persists, there are many immigrant communities in the US that aren’t as privileged and are in need of community support. Organizations like the Los Angeles Asian Pacific Giving Circle and the Japanese American Cultural & Community Center seek to provide that. While doing so, they break down the myth of Asian American immunity to “setbacks,” illness, and poverty.

More happenings in LA, World War II veteran Susumu “Sus” Ito reflects on his photographs taken during the war, now exhibited at the Japanese American National Museum in Little Tokyo. To add, soldiers were prohibited from documenting the experience, but he “like[s] to break the rules.” (We love rebels!)

In lighter news, WeLove founder Keira Peng reconstructs online dating. She provides a service for Asian women, intending to reform “cultural practices that keep [them] from dating successfully.” Speaking of dating, desi actress Kiran Rai debuted her web series “Anarkali” last Thursday. It delves into South Asian dating experiences of the title character. Here’s the second episode!

More on the the cultural practices of love and marriage (and sex), a New Yorker writer observes the Chinese lingerie business in Upper Egypt. He explores the business’s role–the place sexy clothing has–in the conservative culture among Muslims and Coptic Christians, post-Mubarak.



This week’s Link Roundup is curated by Editorial intern Holly Hensley. She is a student, poet, and memoirist at New Jersey City University who loves Twin Peaks waaay too much (and often wishes she was the vivacious Audrey Horne). Her poetry is published in PATHS, NJCU’s student-run literary journal.

Comments are closed.