Articles tagged China
20 Results

To Forget the World, Only to Discover the World: A Conversation with Krys Lee

By Hannah Michell | February 27, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The author of How I Became a North Korean speaks about the power of fiction to give clarity to the world.

Why I Write in English

By Yang Huang | August 22, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘Wanting privacy in a police state was sheer stupidity’—to tell the stories of her family in China without the threat of censorship, Yang Huang had to look beyond Mandarin.

Hong Kong vs. Goliath

By Elaine Yu and Jeffrey Wasserstrom | July 2, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

With Canto-pop star Denise Ho and bookseller-turned-whistleblower Lam Wing-Kee, Hong Kong’s pro-democracy movement is putting the old tactic of boycotts to new use

We’re in the Room, Calvin Trillin

By AAWW | April 11, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Writers respond to Trillin’s doggerel “Have They Run Out of Provinces Yet?”

Digging a Hole to China

By Michelle Chen | January 15, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

In Huan Hsu’s The Porcelain Thief, the search for a family treasure unearths the spell of nostalgia

The Night Suzy Link Goes Missing

By Lisa Ko | September 24, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘Last week some of the other kids dug a hole to China in the dirt lot behind the Purtells’ house. Down at the end of Locust Street, that swampy neverland that reeked of skunk cabbage.’

Loyal Roads to Betrayal: An Interview with Ha Jin

By Anelise Chen | June 1, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The writer discusses China before and since Tiananmen, abandoned enemy spies, and how solidarity will build a nation.

Studio Visit: Kelly Zen-Yie Tsai

By Ryan Wong | July 22, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

A group of artists, writers, and musicians led by Kelly Tsai is teaming up to put on a multi-media performance based on the work of Ai Weiwei

An Impossible Present: Five Poets from Nanjing

By Dong Sun | July 2, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

What time and place can call you home? are you an epiphany? a question? / Is it something / you only pretended to welcome, something you’ve come to regret?

25 Years After the Tiananmen Crackdown

By Mel Chin and Bob Lee | June 2, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

In response to the Tiananmen Square protests and crackdown of 1989, the Asian American Arts Centre organized a landmark exhibition of artworks. To commemorate the protest’s 25th anniversary, The Margins partnered with Creative Time Reports to interview the artists involved.

Fu Manchu and Lao She

By Jeffrey Wasserstrom | February 4, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Where the “Yellow Peril incarnate” meets one novelist’s depictions of China and its diaspora in the early 20th century

Liao Yiwu: Four Years a Prisoner

By Jiayang Fan | January 28, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

An interview with the exiled Chinese poet on writing from prison, false patriotism, and the responsibility of intellectuals

Alan Chin’s Toishan

By Alan Chin | October 23, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

A photojournalist returns to his ancestral home to capture what is left of a long history of migration between China and the US.

Scattered Sand: China’s Migrant Workers Get a Voice

By RYAN WONG | January 9, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

An interview with journalist Hsiao-Hung Pai, whose book Scattered Sand tells the stories of Chinese migrant workers—direct from their mouths.

Meet Hualing Nieh, Mo Yan’s “Literary Mother”

By Jeff Tompkins | November 9, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Orhan Pamuk and Mo Yan, Noble Prize winners in Literature, were both writers-in-residence at the prestigious International Writing Program. An interview with IWP’s current director about one of the program’s founders, the remarkable Chinese novelist Hualing Nieh.

Fear Itself: The Hysterics of Death by China

By Ryan Lee Wong | September 25, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

An alarming new documentary blames China for America’s woes.

Zen Fishing, or What You Catch Can Catch You, Too

By Luis H. Francia | August 14, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Poet and journalist Luis H. Francia journeys through Japan, bearing witness to the devastation wrought by the 2011 earthquake and tsunami—and to the creativity arising from these very areas.

Portrait of the Artist as an Activist | Ai Weiwei: Never Sorry

By Ryan Lee Wong | July 27, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

A new documentary about the famed Chinese artist and dissident focuses on his activism more than it does his art.

Contest: Hao Nao, Gaokao?

By AAWW Staff | June 22, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Compared to China’s national university entrance exam, the gaokao (lit., “test you must ace or work as a menial laborer for the rest of your life”), the SATs are a stroll in the park.

Tailor-Made: Hollywood Tries to Suit China

By Shining Li and Katherine Zhang | June 19, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

But the media bungles it up with an overly simplistic “Red China” narrative.

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