Articles tagged Immigration
34 Results

Immigration in A

By Kristin Chang | March 23, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘When I held him in my palm, I learned to love what made me. From time to time, I think about my father, his country, clean hands. I like to think of his hands as clean. I like to think I owe nothing to his body.’

What Solidarity Looks Like After the Women’s March

By Aber Kawas | January 27, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Palestinian American community organizer Aber Kawas reflects on #IMarchWithLinda and putting the spotlight on those who are less visible

Lessons of Our Recent Past

By Julie Shiroishi | November 7, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

As Election Day approaches, remembering the story of my parents’ immigrant survival, from Japanese internment to community activism, proves more important than ever.

Mr. Nadaraja’s Boy

By Dinesh McCoy | October 28, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Did she look up, see the lettering on his nametag, N-A-D-A-R-A-J-A, and think to herself, “A Tamil I don’t know? In Findlay, Ohio?”

Mg Roberts: “Displacement Is a Moment of Translation”

By Maw Shein Win | September 26, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

An interview with Bay Area poet, teacher, and artist Mg Roberts on interpreting graffiti, fragmented immigrant narratives, and how everyday is an opportunity to revise

Tickets to Disneyland

By Fan Wu | September 16, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘Bonita, that engineer from Spain who always worked late, must have gone home already. Yong looked down at his ironed shirt and felt disappointed—if he had done the third floor half an hour earlier he might have seen her.’

Why I Write in English

By Yang Huang | August 22, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘Wanting privacy in a police state was sheer stupidity’—to tell the stories of her family in China without the threat of censorship, Yang Huang had to look beyond Mandarin.

Blue Skies

By Sobia Khan | July 1, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘That first day in America, she didn’t know the difference between police officers and immigration officers, or between waiting rooms and holding cells.’

Islamophobia in the Bible Belt

By Deepa Iyer | May 4, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

As immigrant communities reshape Tennessee’s racial landscape, how the state has become a breeding ground for anti-Muslim sentiment

Hasanthika Sirisena’s Country Surrealism

By Leland Cheuk | April 13, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The author talks about her award-winning collection of short stories, which takes us on a contemporary Sri Lankan’s global journey

Ochazuke

By Mike Fu | April 8, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘He doubts he has the capacity to uproot himself and start over in a foreign land at this age. But times of war and revolution have a tendency to embolden the meek, to electrify the confident.’

To an Unknown Passenger

By Phinder Dulai | February 23, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘my hulled hands crash against the tide / to the unloved I will offer / a part of me / in hope my wards will be made complete / for another life’

Bite Hard: Three Poems by Justin Chin (1969-2015)

By Justin Chin | February 2, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘when I am dark/ when I am no more light/ when I am no / more an abomination/ when I am no more shame/ when I am face / again/ when the collective being of me worships god, family, / education and the collective administrative silver spoon, / then I will be back in the fold.’

I am a Slave to Narrative

By Melani Budianta and Yvonne Michalik | December 10, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The Indonesian fiction writer Intan Paramaditha on the political potential of horror and writing as a feminist practice

Bad Women: Intan Paramaditha’s “Apple and Knife”

By Intan Paramaditha | December 10, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘In this way, people kept talking about her, and she continued to come to family gatherings. In the eyes of my relatives, she remained a problem that refused to be simplified.’

Terrorist-ish

By Shymala Dason | December 4, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘Shouldn’t be singing such a song, Ravi knew. But what to do? Inspiration, that was what was happening to him. He couldn’t help it. Had to let it out. He was artist. Couldn’t be always thinking about wars and horrors.’

Why I Set My Novel in an Unnamed Country

By Chaitali Sen | November 12, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

An imaginary setting gave me, a child of immigrants, the authority to write about belonging unquestionably to one’s surroundings

Setting a Place

By Rohan Kamicheril | October 28, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Sustainable eating can often feel like the privilege of a well-heeled elite, but how do the appetites and labor of New York City’s immigrant communities fit into the picture?

I’m Nature Boy: Two Poems by Albert Saijo

By Albert Saijo | October 13, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“ALL WILL COME BACK FROM ROOTS – NOTHING KILLS BLACKBERRY – BUT WHERE ARE ALL THE SPARROWS”

You are Nothing But a Dog

By Vt Hung | October 9, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“When she began crying, I thought about the rainfall in Viet Nam, how she said it was so heavy a person could hide in it.”

Immigrant Cartography by Cathy Guo

By Cathy Guo | September 22, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘No others no-place/what to do but hoard the remaining solaces’

The Sad Ambassador

By Ananda Devi | August 7, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘What he saw in this other world was the dust on men, not men themselves. It was the color of the land, not a history the land told.’

Not My Father’s Equal

By Julie Wu | July 24, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

I didn’t expect him to smile and say, “I love you,” as Americans did. I had never seen him smile and I would never expect him to embrace me; he never had. But perhaps there was some way—some subtle, casual way—that he could acknowledge my worth.

The Suitcase

By Sung Woo | July 3, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘Our apartment, our home, became an unfamiliar space. We still slept in the same queen bed, but no longer did we speak of upgrading to the capacious king. We could now easily fit two additional people in the valley of the bedsheet between us.’

Writing Into Silence

By Bushra Rehman | October 16, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Cathy Linh Che talks about her debut collection of poems, Split, and what it means to mimic flashbacks of war, immigration, and sexual violence.

ABCD: Who Are You Calling Confused?

By Kishwer Vikaas | July 24, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

A look back at the history behind ‘American Born Confused Desi’ and where it’s gone since

Letters to Doc

By Cathy Linh Che | June 3, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

I look up at the trees. / Like me, they have disrobed. / They have disarmed me

The Swamp of this Moment

By Jyothi Natarajan | April 11, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

An interview with Akhil Sharma, author of Family Life, on how to write a novel that has no plot, literary modernism’s influence, and remembering India

Yellow Peril: 19th-Century Scapegoating

By John Kuo Wei Tchen and Dylan Yeats | March 5, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

How fear of the “the mob” turned into racial exclusion. Excerpts from a recently published archive of anti-Asian fear

Minority Rules: 2050, According to Oyama Enrico Isamu Letter

By Oyama Enrico Isamu Letter | April 17, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

In three decades, the United States will have a “majority-minority” population. We asked four artists to consider this demographic shift. Here is Oyama Enrico Isamu Letter, an abstract artist and painter who draws on the visual elements of graffiti culture.

Rogue State: Jeff Biggers on the Arizonification of America

By Michelle Chen | September 20, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

In an interview about his new book, State Out of the Union, author Jeff Biggers examines Arizona, the so-called “meth lab of democracy,” and the rogue state’s cycles of repression and resistance.

The Ghosts of Omonia Square

By Ranbir Sidhu | August 29, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

In Athens, an historic square and neighborhood now home to porno theaters, sex stores, and “café” brothels, is alive with immigrants—until it isn’t.

Rewatching A Beijinger in New York

By Ying Li | July 12, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Ying Li talks to her novelist mother, Lin Chang, about the first Chinese-language TV show to be shot in the United States.

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