Articles tagged poetry
35 Results

JFK Airport

By Celina Su | September 26, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘As if I could get un-situated / this airport a bubble hovering / in a void between celestial bodies / in but not of / the country I stand in.’

AAWWTV: Poetry Poetry V

By AAWW | September 7, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Kimiko Hahn, Monica Youn, Sally Wen Mao and Emily Yoon joined us for a night of poetry.

accent

By ko ko thett | September 5, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

People judge me by my skin. My skin’s purpose in life is to prove them wrong.

Keeping Tabs: A Critical Eye

By AAWW | August 29, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

This week’s articles are about the current U.S. political climate–but don’t worry, we have some new tunes for you to enjoy, too!

Ghosts in the War Machine: Jane Wong’s Overpour

By Sally Wen Mao | June 6, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The poet talks about her debut collection, sharing silenced histories in her writing, and being a “wild girl poet.”

Silence and Breath: Kaveh Akbar and Kazim Ali

By Kaveh Akbar and Kazim Ali | June 2, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The two poets talk about their literary family trees, poetry as a protective force, and the changing landscape for Muslim American writers.

宇多田 ヒカル and the Huntsman: Poems by Kazumi Chin

By Kazumi Chin | May 23, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘This drought of silence / that does not feed me. I mean, I refuse / to hold his vanity. And demand to know / myself better. Cull his soul but only / for memory, carve a history / for myself in which my reflection / alone can be seen.’

Salome Dances the Seven Veils, Asks for the Head of a Baptist in Return

By Nina Li Coomes | April 18, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘No words of a Savior are news to a Woman. / No words of a resurrection sound gospel[-enough] / when you are both the Crucifixion and the Crowd.’

The Dirt Will Wash Us Clean: Poems by Hari Alluri

By Hari Alluri | April 4, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘We do not want to hover like a line of fog, a river’s shadow, but slower: shadows in conversation, gentle only when we don’t bother expecting to be heard.’

Keeping Tabs: An American Story

By Yasmin Majeed | February 3, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Muslim Ban CliffsNotes, honoring the late, great Bharati Mukherjee, why Fred Korematsu’s story still matters today, and more.

“Nautical Shrouds”

By Vi Khi Nao | January 24, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘I roam. Sometimes in solitude; sometimes in a crowd. But unlike a dog, I do not die a little each day, subdued to the loyalty of my master. I die all at once if it must be.’

The Pentagram Discovery by W. Todd Kaneko

By W. Todd Kaneko | January 3, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘If you spark a flame and turn / it upside down, / you will find it is still / a flame.’

Moment of Explosion: On Solmaz Sharif’s ‘Look’

By Yasmin Majeed | November 30, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Dissecting the violence of state, warfare, and language

AAWW TV: Microagressions (& Other Poems)

By AAWW | November 17, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Poets Claudia Rankine and Hoa Nguyen speak with Rigoberto Gonzalez about the urgent need for poetry as a force for political change.

Mg Roberts: “Displacement Is a Moment of Translation”

By Maw Shein Win | September 26, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

An interview with Bay Area poet, teacher, and artist Mg Roberts on interpreting graffiti, fragmented immigrant narratives, and how everyday is an opportunity to revise

AAWW TV: Remixing Guantanamo Bay

By AAWW | March 23, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Poet Philip Metres talks about why he chose to create an opera from a redacted history of torture

After Yi-Fen Chou: A Forum

By AAWW | September 15, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

19 writers respond to Michael Derrick Hudson’s yellowface

Your Closest Relative is a TV Set

By David Foote | July 8, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Writer-artist-professor Tan Lin talks fictive relatives, the narrative of an immigrant TV culture, and ‘becoming Chinese’ in America

Authenticity Obsession, or Conceptualism as Minstrel Show

By Ken Chen | June 11, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

What recent race scandals by avant-garde poets Kenneth Goldsmith and Vanessa Place have to do with sunglasses, the invention of the fingerprint, and the atom bomb.

Writing Into Silence

By Bushra Rehman | October 16, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Cathy Linh Che talks about her debut collection of poems, Split, and what it means to mimic flashbacks of war, immigration, and sexual violence.

Body Plus Poem

By Yasmin Majeed | August 12, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

An interview with spoken word duo DarkMatter on radical desis, the legacy of Partition, Twitter poems and The Perks of Being a Wallflower

Apiology, with Stigma and Other Poems

By Sally Wen Mao | June 13, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

I don’t teach my girls / to brave the violence of sun, sons, or stings. / When resources run out, don’t sit there and behave. / Abandon hive.

A Cupcake Is Identity As Much As Syntax Is Identity

By Abeer Hoque | May 28, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

A review of Tarfia Faizullah’s debut poetry collection Seam, and an interview with the poet

Refusal=Intervention

By Eunsong K. & Don Mee Choi | March 7, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“Asian American Poetry” is not a manageable category—it is not a list.

“Stet” and Other Poems

By Tamiko Beyer | January 13, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

My palms cannot hold back the shifting currents. / They can slap a rhythm, hoist / a banner, hold / your face tenderly between them

“I’m Really Sorry for That Horrible Line Break”

By Henry W. Leung | December 6, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

An interview with poet Tung-Hui Hu

9/11/11

By April Naoko Heck | November 20, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

I hate you, poem, for wanting to know the truth. / The truth is, I trusted the sky. / Trusted it wouldn’t throw things at us

Two Poems by R.A. Villanueva

By R.A. Villanueva | November 20, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The rivers / and trenches glossed with light / know we are so relentless as to plan / for catastrophe

Illiteracy

By Feng Sun Chen | November 6, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The key to enjoying the jubilant, fleshy dread of Feng Sun Chen’s supercut poem is appreciating what one might call the bodily turn in poetry.

Songs of Revolt

By Ali Mir, Bushra Rehman, Purvi Shah, and Syed Mohammed Shahed | October 29, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Poetic responses to the literature of the Ghadar movement

Studio Visit | Page Turner Edition: Victoria Chang

By Victoria Chang | October 3, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The author of The Boss thinks she might be the only person left on this planet without an iPod—but her poems are certianly full of music.

Studio Visit: Meena Alexander

By Meena Alexander | August 23, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

This New York-based poet once dreamt of being a trapeze artist.

The Boss

By Victoria Chang | July 31, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Four Poems by Victoria Chang

Monday Clicks: Lunar New Year, Celine Dion and Other Forms of “Poetry”

By Anne Ishii | February 11, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Link-bait for the Monday-challenged.

Speaker in a Future Age: Ed Bok Lee on Poetry, Places and the Death of Tongues

By Sueyeun Juliette Lee | November 28, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“I have a mole on the bottom of my foot, and some of my more superstitious relatives told me that if you have a mole on the sole of one foot, you’ll always yearn to visit new places more than most.”

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