Articles in the Everything Category
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A (2012) Midsummer History Lesson

By Negin Farsad | October 5, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

It’s the year 2352, and the Walrusoids are at it again, speculating over divorce, SB 1070, some tall Asian guy named Jeremy Lin, and movie theater masturbation.

The Occasional Writer: An Interview with Science Fiction Author Ted Chiang

By Vandana Singh | October 3, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Fellow sci-fi writer Vandana Singh quizzes the award-winning, short-fiction master on his axiomatic approaches, paradigm shifts, and whether he would ever own a digient.

EXCERPT: The Story of My Assassins

By Tarun Tejpal | September 27, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“Our Mordor was the same. Our Frankenstein was the same. Our Tinker Bell was the same. We didn’t have to imagine Davy Jones—a graphics company in Silicon Valley was manufacturing him for us. We all picked our visuals from the universal pool. The individual monster was dead.”

Fear Itself: The Hysterics of Death by China

By Ryan Lee Wong | September 25, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

An alarming new documentary blames China for America’s woes.

Rogue State: Jeff Biggers on the Arizonification of America

By Michelle Chen | September 20, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

In an interview about his new book, State Out of the Union, author Jeff Biggers examines Arizona, the so-called “meth lab of democracy,” and the rogue state’s cycles of repression and resistance.

From Laundromats to Radiolab: Jad Abumrad Peers into Thao Nguyen’s Old Soul

By Jad Abumrad | September 19, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“The first real song I wrote was a book report for Lord of the Flies.”

YA Fiction and Issues that Aren’t Fictitious: A Q&A with Adaptation Author Malinda Lo

By Phyllis Fong | September 18, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“I absolutely did not set out to write a lesbian Cinderella. It wasn’t the story I intended to tell, so it took me a while to come around to the idea of telling it.”

Catch Me Online: The Dead Do Not Improve’s Jay Caspian Kang

By Hua Hsu | September 14, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The journalist and debut fiction writer chats with fellow Grantland writer Hua Hsu about his new neo-noir novel, grading papers, and Duck Down videos.

Ashok and Anil Go to the Cafe

By Ashok Kondabolu | September 11, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Ashok Kondabolu of Das Racist interviews Anil Dash, the blogger and technologist, at Financier Patisserie, near Astor Place.

Excerpt: Qiu Miaojin’s Notes of a Crocodile

By Qiu Miaojin | September 5, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Qiu Miaojin—one of the first openly lesbian writers in ’90s post-martial-law Taiwan—committed suicide at the age of 26. What follows is an excerpt from her “survival manual” for a younger generation. With an introduction by translator Bonnie Huie.

The Ghosts of Omonia Square

By Ranbir Sidhu | August 29, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

In Athens, an historic square and neighborhood now home to porno theaters, sex stores, and “café” brothels, is alive with immigrants—until it isn’t.

Muslim Self-Portraits (and Accusations) at Heart Mountain

By Hana Maruyama | August 22, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

At the Japanese American internment camp site, an art exhibit featuring photographs of Muslims has been the subject of complaints.

Nonsense Made Sense: The Downside Up World of Stephen Chow

By La Frances Hui | August 16, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The veteran comedian, actor and director was the epitome of Hong Kong’s ’90s-era mo lei tau subculture.

What’s the best pitch you’ve ever gotten?

By Agony Agent | August 16, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Our mystery veteran agents answer your questions about the book industry.

Zen Fishing, or What You Catch Can Catch You, Too

By Luis H. Francia | August 14, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Poet and journalist Luis H. Francia journeys through Japan, bearing witness to the devastation wrought by the 2011 earthquake and tsunami—and to the creativity arising from these very areas.

London Olympics, 1948: Her Name Meant Double Victory

By Hana Maruyama | August 10, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Diver Vicki Manalo Draves won two gold medals in rations-enforced London. To celebrate, she ate horse.

Near To The Alien: Katie Kitamura on Gone To The Forest

By Hermione Hoby | August 7, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Kitamura chats with Hermione Hoby about her new novel, a “collage of colonialism.”

What I Have Learned About the World from Books, and What the World Could Stand to Learn from the Shooting at the Sikh Temple

By Matthew Salesses | August 7, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Matthew Salesses on the power of words and appearances.

Hello World: How Nike Sold Tiger Woods

By Hiram Perez | August 2, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

How did a multinational corporation like Nike appeal to diverse markets without violating the principle of colorblindness that became increasingly and insidiously sacrosanct in the U.S. in the 1990s? A deconstruction of two infamous Tiger Woods ads sheds some light.

Cindy Sherman Plays Wolf (To Nikki S. Lee’s Chameleon)

By Sylvia Kwon | August 1, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

How do you get from Cindy Sherman, to Nikki S. Lee, and back?

Youth Fiction Undone: R. Zamora Linmark’s Debut

By Roopika Risam | July 30, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The Leche author’s first novel—set in Hawaii and replete with lush pop-cultural references—can be read as a postmodern YA gem.

Portrait of the Artist as an Activist | Ai Weiwei: Never Sorry

By Ryan Lee Wong | July 27, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

A new documentary about the famed Chinese artist and dissident focuses on his activism more than it does his art.

GAOKAO NAO: The Winners of Our “Hao Nao, Gao Kao” Contest!

By | July 26, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Drum roll, please. The results of our “Gao Kao” contest, co-hosted by Wall Street Journal “Tao Jones” columnist Jeff Yang, are in.

Honorable Mention: Tze-Ming Mok, “Pants, Too, Should Be Optional”

By Tze-Ming Mok | July 26, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“Only when the Imperial Wang—or as they say in English, “The Wang of Wangs,” is shoved directly in the face of the public, will the Emperor’s potency be fully apparent.”

Third Place: Laura Chu, “Clean or Cloudy, It’s All Relative”

By Laura Chu | July 26, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“Fry these days! Maybe he had been exposed to too many pesticides as an egg.”

Second Place: Alice Yen, “The Evolution of [Love] Letters”

By Alice Yen | July 26, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Various communications methods are being developed: email, SMS, etc. Do you think the letter is replaceable?

First Place: Mic Nguyen, “Supplemental Instructions”

By Mic Nguyen | July 26, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“Assume the fish are swimming in clean, pollution-free water. Assume any cloudiness to be a consequence of naturally occurring solvents or debris.”

Ching-In Chen: Zuihitsu to An Earlier Self

By Hana Maruyama | July 25, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Queer poet Ching-In Chen’s letter to her younger self procures its epistolary strength from the loosely connected ideas of the zuihitsu.

WATCH: Junot Diaz and Min Jin Lee on Writer Origins

By Lali Foster | July 25, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“They say to write something new you’ve got to be lost.” An excerpted video conversation featuring the Pulitzer Prize winner and the author of Free Food for Millionaires.

Reading: Alif the Unseen

By Hana Maruyama | July 20, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

A new novel, written just before the Arab Spring, tells the story of a hacker turned revolutionary.

Ashok and Sheng Go on the Kiddie Ride

By Ashok Kondabolu | July 19, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Part two of an epic conversation between Ashok Kondabolu of Das Racist and Comedy Central comedian Sheng Wang.

Tsai Ming-Liang’s Wayward Boundaries

By Jennifer Pan | July 18, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Can a movie that explicitly demonstrates the darkest grotesqueries of pornography actually function as a refusal to condemn it? Tsai Ming-Liang’s The Wayward Cloud hints at this possibility.

Here We Are Becoming Champs

By Melissa Chadburn | July 17, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“Pacquiao became the second man in boxing history to win world titles in six different weight divisions. There he was: our uncle, our Tito, our brother, our kuya.”

Mountain Brothers: Winning Voices

By Oliver Wang | July 16, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“Since their submission was purely auditory, no one at Sprite realized they were Asian American.”

Excerpt: Gun Dealers’ Daughter

By Gina Apostol | July 16, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“My father’s warehouse was close to the decayed parts of the harbor, which rambled on into the slums built by smugglers and sailors.”

Sea Salty: The Man and the Crab

By Harley Spiller | July 13, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Former Marine mess cook John Gun Pin knew how to handle a cleaver. Harley Spiller (a.k.a. Inspector Collector) remembers his old friend, and the last dish he prepared: cured crab, or ha cha.

Ashok and Sheng Take Cover

By Ashok Kondabolu | July 12, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

In the first installment of his interview column, “The Cornering,” Ashok Kondabolu of Das Racist chats it up with Comedy Central comedian Sheng Wang. They also traipse the streets of Chinatown. Look out for part deux of this interview next week.

Rewatching A Beijinger in New York

By Ying Li | July 12, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Ying Li talks to her novelist mother, Lin Chang, about the first Chinese-language TV show to be shot in the United States.

Chasing Down the #Ghandifoul

By Siddhartha Mitter | July 11, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

A new Twitter feed goes after those who commit the common crime of misspelling Mahatma Gandhi’s last name.

R.I.P. Isuzu Yamada

By Anne Ishii | July 10, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The Tokyo New Wave actress featured brilliantly in films by Ozu, Mizoguchi, and Kurosawa.

Behind This Photo Is a Woman Crying

By Melissa Chadburn | July 10, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

A writer joins a protest against a proposed Walmart in L.A.’s Chinatown.

Bands of Brothers

By Oliver Wang | July 2, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Over the course of the ’90s, Filipino American scratch crews transformed the realm of hip-hop DJing.

Timothy McVeigh and our “Buried History”

By Manan Ahmed | June 27, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

On the domestic terror of the 1990s, and avoiding cultural amnesia.

Xu Xi is my name.

By Ken Chen | June 27, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The transnational writer dishes about Law and Order, her favorite drinks, and less-than-romantic writing habits.

Party with DREAMer Julio Salgado at our Launch Celebration

By AAWW Staff | June 27, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

A round-up of articles, interviews and videos featuring Salgado, who was recently among the first undocumented immigrants to be featured on the cover of TIME magazine. The artist and activist will be screenprinting at AAWW’s launch party tonight.

When Your Video Game Gets You Branded a Spy

By Anne Ishii | June 25, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

A former Rockstar Games developer’s new project about the Iranian Revolution has gotten him labeled a spy.

Danny Boyle’s Eighty-Six Flavors

By Siddhartha Mitter | June 25, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop
Tags:

The leaked playlist for the London Olympics opening ceremony is almost absurdly eclectic, and includes the bhangra track, “Nachna Onda Nei.”

Contest: Hao Nao, Gaokao?

By AAWW Staff | June 22, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Compared to China’s national university entrance exam, the gaokao (lit., “test you must ace or work as a menial laborer for the rest of your life”), the SATs are a stroll in the park.

Rescripting Armageddon in Tropic of Orange

By Warren Liu | June 19, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Karen Tei Yamashita’s novel of a dystopic ’90s L.A. tangles with both disasters and distractions.

Tailor-Made: Hollywood Tries to Suit China

By Shining Li and Katherine Zhang | June 19, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

But the media bungles it up with an overly simplistic “Red China” narrative.

The Writing on the Shirt: Nirvana and the Politics of Selling Out

By Hua Hsu | June 19, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

A Grantland writer and Nirvana fan ponders the quintessential ’90s question.

How soon can I write my memoir?

By Agony Agent | June 18, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The inaugural installment of our publishing advice column. Send our Agony Agents your most pressing book industry questions!

With Grain: A Q&A with Apichatpong Weerasethakul

By Katie Kitamura | June 15, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The acclaimed Thai filmmaker sits down with novelist Katie Kitamura for a conversation about narrative vs. storytelling, black magic, and migrant populations.

Magic Mediation: Wu-Tang’s Kung Fu Zeal

By Sophia Chang | June 13, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

An up-close and personal take on the hip-hop group’s love of kung fu.

Nick Carter: Killmaster, Yogi, Lover.

By Anne Ishii | June 13, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Spy novels as Asian kitsch.

Stay Sassy

By Jamia Wilson | June 12, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

A love letter to the magazine that defined a generation.

Class of 1997

By Oliver Wang | June 12, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

It was a banner year for Asian American narrative films.

Takeshi Miyakawa’s “Arresting” Creations

By Katherine Zhang | June 11, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The artist’s plastic-bag installations caught the attention of the NYPD.

Tania James doesn’t want to read your mind.

By Ken Chen | June 11, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The Aerogrammes author chats about her preferred superpower and her love of Norton Anthologies.

History Lessons, Walrusoid Style

By Negin Farsad | June 11, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

In the year 2352, they scratch their heads over Instagram, Mitt Romney, Kony, and Siri.

WATCH: Celebrating the Lifetime Achievements of Jessica Hagedorn at PageTurner 2011

By Jessica Wang | June 9, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Ma-Yi Theater Company pays tribute to Jessica Hagedorn with a special performance.

Don Lee on how to smooth out your jibes. A Q&A.

By Ken Chen | June 8, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The author of The Collective chats with AAWW executive director Ken Chen about windsurfing, his writing chair, and the best way to eat eggs.

Born in the U.S.A.: Cornershop’s “Brimful of Asha”

By Manan Desai | June 7, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The British desi band’s kitschy, three-chord hit appeared on episodes of Friends and in a Gap commercial.

Idées Vagues, Images Claires

By Anne Ishii | June 7, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

On rural Chinese costume jewelry, and eerily quiet portraits.

Asian Chic

By Thuy Linh Tu | June 6, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The ‘90s saw Western designers outsourcing not just manufacturing, but inspiration, to Asia.

“Where is your ‘White literature’ section?”

By Amitava Kumar | June 4, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Author, professor, and provocateur Amitava Kumar has a very specific question for New York City book clerks.

The Revolution of Word Sound Power

By Siddhartha Mitter | June 3, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Delhi-based reggae MC Taru Dalmia travels to villages in India to record songs that speak truth to power.

Rihanna’s Orientalist Turn

By Katherine Zhang | June 3, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The singer stars in Coldplay’s perplexing (and embarrassing) “Princess of China” music video.

Pen and Paper. . . on Paper

By Anne Ishii | June 3, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

In Japan, stationery magazines repopulate like bunnies.

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