Articles in the Fiction Category
66 Results

Corona Halal Meats

By Bushra Rehman | October 13, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The masjid wasn’t even close to finished, but our fathers were starting from the top and were building their way down.

The Quiet Ones

By Glenn Diaz | October 11, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

They always had us at hello, the Americans.

All My Grandmother’s Birds

By Moez Surani | September 26, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘I ventured out one morning and, from the lawn, I stared at all of the green beaks. I tried to count all of them but there were more buried, slumbering birds in our garden than I knew numbers for. And I remembered how in winter they left us and the air was so quiet and empty.’

Bona Fide Relationships

By AAWW | September 26, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Through stories, essays, and poems, writers imagine new narratives that speak to Trump’s Muslim ban

Sisters

By Do Jae Kim | April 14, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Scotch-taped at the mirrors’ edges were photographs of birthdays, family vacations, running in the rain. Their edges had curled from sixteen years of steam from hot showers and baths.

Funeral by the Arcade

By Leland Cheuk | December 9, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

In video games, the fear of the sudden propels you forward. Not so in life.

AMPLIFY(HER): Raising the Counter-Narrative

By AMPLIFY(HER) | November 4, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

From comfort food to college applications, this zine showcases the stories of undocumented women from the Asian Diaspora

Mr. Nadaraja’s Boy

By Dinesh McCoy | October 28, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Did she look up, see the lettering on his nametag, N-A-D-A-R-A-J-A, and think to herself, “A Tamil I don’t know? In Findlay, Ohio?”

The Great Abramovich

By George Gao | October 14, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘I glanced curiously at the stranger. He looked old and frail. The sky outside the window seemed darker with his figure in profile. Though he was sitting next to us, he appeared to be somewhere else entirely.’

Tickets to Disneyland

By Fan Wu | September 16, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘Bonita, that engineer from Spain who always worked late, must have gone home already. Yong looked down at his ironed shirt and felt disappointed—if he had done the third floor half an hour earlier he might have seen her.’

Liked by Few, Hated by Most, Feared by All

By Vt Hung | September 2, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

I see my forebears, warriors in retirement, laboring in endless fields, bustling markets, and desolate seas. One by one they all stop, turn to me, and say: “If you have good hands, anything can happen.”

An Artificial Organ

By Sarah Wang | August 19, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘What else was contained within the pages? What had come before the tofu boxes and dusty scrolls, the grumpy old man who spent his last two decades in America cloistered in my uncle’s back house?’

Pacita

By Melissa R. Sipin | August 5, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘I am, I want to be, the rain, I want to be the ocean, just so I could say back to her: I am home now.’

Blue Skies

By Sobia Khan | July 1, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘That first day in America, she didn’t know the difference between police officers and immigration officers, or between waiting rooms and holding cells.’

Reunion

By Denis Wong | June 17, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘Danny’s hands dropped to his knees as he gasped. He felt something…a fist pressed against his face. I’m being punched, he thought as he fell. This is me being punched. It was a familiar feeling. Almost nostalgic.’

All This Paper

By Joseph Han | June 3, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘The signs were like a collective raft, keeping them afloat as they waited on responses to their calls of distress.’

Horror Story

By Rachel Rostad | May 24, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘In my favorite fiction about us, I would see you and some bell within me would toll—the way an elephant will walk over the bones of its own kind, know it instantly, and fall down and mourn. Instead, I looked away. What struck me was not like lightning or love, and so I wept.’

Kareem: An Excerpt from Technologies of the Self

By Haris A. Durrani | April 15, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘He lingered on the edges of my social field of view, here in the basement lab where it was hot and loud’

Ochazuke

By Mike Fu | April 8, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘He doubts he has the capacity to uproot himself and start over in a foreign land at this age. But times of war and revolution have a tendency to embolden the meek, to electrify the confident.’

A Penny Short

By Peter HZ Hsu | March 18, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘I left them both at the wedding reception. The best man was toasting the groom by listing all the women he’d given up for his new bride, and I’d had about enough.’

Ghost Forest

By Pik-Shuen Fung | March 4, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘Say, I’m here, Dad, my mom said. I’m here, Dad, I said. You have to say it louder so he can hear you.’

My Family Was Under Threat

By Meiko Ko | February 19, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘I’m conducting an experiment for escape.’

Foraging

By Aditya Desai | February 5, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

He’d gotten used to the routine of filling out the job applications: name, address, past positions, done. But then came that deadly box, ‘Have you ever been convicted of a crime or felony?’

History Through Invention: Iksaka Banu’s “Farewell to Hindia”

By Iksaka Banu | January 29, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘When the Japanese were in power, I realized that the Dutch East Indies with all of its aristocratic ways, was finished. I must have the guts to say goodbye to it. And whatever fate befalls me, I will remain here.’

The Starfruit Tree

By Ashwak Fardoush | December 25, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘Because she had saved my sister once, when my mother tried to pound out the wildness from my sister’s body with both words and sticks, no one ever came to rescue her.’

Bad Women: Intan Paramaditha’s “Apple and Knife”

By Intan Paramaditha | December 10, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘In this way, people kept talking about her, and she continued to come to family gatherings. In the eyes of my relatives, she remained a problem that refused to be simplified.’

Terrorist-ish

By Shymala Dason | December 4, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘Shouldn’t be singing such a song, Ravi knew. But what to do? Inspiration, that was what was happening to him. He couldn’t help it. Had to let it out. He was artist. Couldn’t be always thinking about wars and horrors.’

Everyday Islam: Abidah El Khalieqy’s Mataraisa

By Abidah El Khalieqy | November 6, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘But what has happened in our era? If just one vocal daring woman steps forth and speaks of the inequalities of the age and criticizes the establishment, especially those who hold authority, then she is immediately muzzled!’

Bardo

By Muna Gurung | October 23, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘I wonder what happens to skin when it is robbed of touch. Does it break? Does it know to breathe? Does it forget the painful sweetness of a tickle?’

You are Nothing But a Dog

By Vt Hung | October 9, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“When she began crying, I thought about the rainfall in Viet Nam, how she said it was so heavy a person could hide in it.”

The Night Suzy Link Goes Missing

By Lisa Ko | September 24, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘Last week some of the other kids dug a hole to China in the dirt lot behind the Purtells’ house. Down at the end of Locust Street, that swampy neverland that reeked of skunk cabbage.’

Rewriting History: Leila S. Chudori’s Home

By Leila S. Chudori | September 24, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘Where was Mas Han? What was he running from? And why hadn’t he called or tried to get in contact with me? These were my questions, those of a wife, a woman, who had no idea how what had happened would affect the fate of the Indonesian people.’

While We Slept

By Muna Gurung | September 10, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘We pulled together as much of our body parts as we could. We collected everything we lost in sleep, everything we gained, as a three hour-long silence spread over Kathmandu.’

Indexing a Life

By Swati Khurana | September 10, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘The bags of paper are bodies, sitting on ledges, tucking their legs into themselves, folding smaller, hugging themselves for comfort.’

The Degenerates

By Hari Kunzru | September 10, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘Whether they know it or not, they are Middle-English archetypes, judges of good taste. Self appointed gatekeepers. In a word, critics. They know art when they see it and frankly it’s not brown.’

At the Queens Museum

By Amitava Kumar | September 10, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘Here in New York, however, the boat had a different meaning: a migrant who, despite all the baggage he must carry, is still afloat.’

Watch Amitav Ghosh Talk about the Ibis Trilogy

By AAWW Staff | September 7, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Brooklyn, Opium, Diaspora, Imodium. The celebrated writer in conversation on the release of River of Smoke in 2011

Night Garden: An Excerpt from Bright Lines

By Tanwi Nandini Islam | August 21, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘She planted the tiny sleeping nuggets into the ground, as a small prayer. One day, they would metamorphose, escape into the world as something altogether different.’

The Sad Ambassador

By Ananda Devi | August 7, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘What he saw in this other world was the dust on men, not men themselves. It was the color of the land, not a history the land told.’

Not My Father’s Equal

By Julie Wu | July 24, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

I didn’t expect him to smile and say, “I love you,” as Americans did. I had never seen him smile and I would never expect him to embrace me; he never had. But perhaps there was some way—some subtle, casual way—that he could acknowledge my worth.

The Opposite of a Train

By Jennifer Tseng | July 10, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘The image of my small life without the young man was one of a library with its doors locked, or simpler and more terrifying, that of a book with half its pages missing.’

The Suitcase

By Sung Woo | July 3, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘Our apartment, our home, became an unfamiliar space. We still slept in the same queen bed, but no longer did we speak of upgrading to the capacious king. We could now easily fit two additional people in the valley of the bedsheet between us.’

An Excerpt from Viet Thanh Nguyen’s The Sympathizer

By Viet Thanh Nguyen | June 26, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“The month in question was April, the cruelest month. It was the month in which a war that had run on for a very long time would lose its limbs, as is the way of wars.”

The Last Living Aztec

By Lisa Chen | June 12, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘Perhaps it was not what he did so much as how he put it. He insisted on “killed” not “terminated.” He refused “vertical chamber apparatus” in favor of the lurid “pit of despair.” But he also called love “love.” What reason was there to pretend otherwise?’

Quandary (1943-1945)

By Gene Oishi | June 5, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘Over the past three years, the desert had become Hiroshi’s home. Hacienda seemed very far away to him, both in terms of time and distance, and he didn’t want to go back.’ An excerpt from Gene Oishi’s Fox Drum Bebop

I See My Eye in Your Eye

By Bonnie Chau | May 29, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘As children, she liked purple, I liked pink. She liked turkey, I liked ham. She liked American cheese, I liked Swiss.’

Fortune and Riot

By MK Hall | May 8, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘The Korean community has a special name for the LA riots: Sa-I-Gu, Four-Two-Nine, the day it all began.’

Then I Was Blue

By Rowan Hisayo Buchanan | April 1, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

One night, I said, I wish I could tattoo myself onto you.

Blessed Bodies

By Dorothy Tse | March 30, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“The mother, seeing her one-armed son standing in the doorway, was not surprised. It was as she had foreseen.”

Bangladesh: A Thousand Words

By AAWW | April 25, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

In a collection of poetry and prose, writers respond to the work of Bengali photographers exhibited in Eyes on Bangladesh

The Bodyguard

By Tom Cho | April 14, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“Someone is stalking Whitney Houston and I have been hired to be her bodyguard”—an excerpt from Tom Cho’s Look Who’s Morphing

Brother-life by Akhil Sharma

By Akhil Sharma | April 7, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“While a part of me was glad I wasn’t like my brother, no part of me wished to be more fortunate than my mother.”

Where We Live Now Was Once Mourned

By Chang-rae Lee | February 13, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

An excerpt from Chang-rae Lee’s On Such A Full Sea

Einstein Saves Hiroshima

By Phong Nguyen | January 23, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

We were both Ahab; the difference was that Einstein, when he set out on the ink-black sea, knew not what monster he had been pursuing.

Sea Time | from The People in the Trees by Hanya Yanagihara

By Hanya Yanagihara | October 16, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“It had always been that one of Norton’s fondest dreams—the dream, I think, of many brilliant and overextended men—was that one month, or one year, he’d find himself in a warm place with absolutely no commitments.”

Two Truths, Many Lies, and a Novel

By Swati Marquez | September 10, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Swati Marquez interviews Bushra Rehman on her new work of fiction, Corona.

If Death Is a Postman

By Sinan Antoon | August 21, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

An excerpt from Sinan Antoon’s novel, “The Corpse Washer”

The City of Devi: Jaz

By Manil Suri | June 19, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

A man in search of his ex-lover looks back on his coming of age—from Manil Suri’s pre-apocalyptic novel set in Mumbai

Excerpt: ‘The Last Hour of the Bengal Tiger’ from Revenge

By Yoko Ogawa | March 22, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“I suddenly noticed an odor in the air. It was sweet and persistent but not at all unpleasant. I took a deep breath and let myself be guided by the smell.”

Excerpt: H.T. Tsiang’s The Hanging on Union Square

By H.T. Tsiang | March 15, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“Nut was hungry. Nut had to move.” Originally self-published in 1935, this hallucinatory, quasi-experimental novel follows the peripatetic musings of a young man throughout a single day in Depression-era New York.

Excerpt: Lament in the Night

By Shōson Nagahara | December 6, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Originally published in Japanese in 1925, this naturalist noir masterpiece follows itinerant day laborer Ishikawa Sazuko as he prowls the back alleys of Los Angeles, looking for a meal, a job, or just some companionship. With an introduction by translator Andrew Leong.

Cobra Notes for Ban

By Bhanu Kapil | October 17, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“I want a literature that is not made from literature.”

A (2012) Midsummer History Lesson

By Negin Farsad | October 5, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

It’s the year 2352, and the Walrusoids are at it again, speculating over divorce, SB 1070, some tall Asian guy named Jeremy Lin, and movie theater masturbation.

EXCERPT: The Story of My Assassins

By Tarun Tejpal | September 27, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“Our Mordor was the same. Our Frankenstein was the same. Our Tinker Bell was the same. We didn’t have to imagine Davy Jones—a graphics company in Silicon Valley was manufacturing him for us. We all picked our visuals from the universal pool. The individual monster was dead.”

Excerpt: Qiu Miaojin’s Notes of a Crocodile

By Qiu Miaojin | September 5, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Qiu Miaojin—one of the first openly lesbian writers in ’90s post-martial-law Taiwan—committed suicide at the age of 26. What follows is an excerpt from her “survival manual” for a younger generation. With an introduction by translator Bonnie Huie.

Excerpt: Gun Dealers’ Daughter

By Gina Apostol | July 16, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“My father’s warehouse was close to the decayed parts of the harbor, which rambled on into the slums built by smugglers and sailors.”

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