A notebook on the fiftieth anniversary of martial law being declared in the Philippines

By The Asian American Writers’ Workshop
Essays    Reportage    Marginalia    Interviews    Poetry    Fiction    Videos    Everything   
Essays

The “New Society” had its own tricks. Billions disappeared from the nation’s coffers, clowns filled legislative positions.

Fiction

Kay hirap maging mahirap, kung hindi ka pa manginig sa galit ay hindi ka pa iintindihin.
| It’s so hard to be poor. If you don’t tremble with rage, they won’t try to understand you.

Poetry

How does it feel to watch / the seeds of your destruction / walk away from you?

Essays

We walked uphill where tall cogon grasses were already starting to don their silver shade.

Poetry

“@nature, i avoid you,” “my life newly painted is well,” and “@nature, teach me things”

Essays

I became a full-time community organizer in 1971. The Marcos government declared martial law in September 1972. A month later, the Marcos military came and arrested me.

Essays

Marcos knew that power rested not just on fear and terror, but also censorship and propaganda.

Essays

On the urgency of remembering the fourteen years of Ferdinand E. Marcos, Sr.’s military-backed dictatorship in the Philippines

Fifteen pieces on the places that have held us

Essays

Creating a life in the shadow of the martial law years

Essays

The United States would support the Marcos dictatorship disguised as a “constitutional coup d’etat”

Essays

It was Imelda as much as Ferdinand who brought about the country’s ruination

Essays

The Marcoses have always been the masters of myth-making

Rebolusyonaryong panulaan noong panahon ng batas militar |
Revolutionary poetry during the martial law years

Fiction

I wondered if Pia was right, then, if I was seeking something too dangerous to be handled, a bomb that would kill me someday.

Essays

The minute I arrived at the University of the Philippines as a freshman, I joined the marches.

Essays

A brief history lesson on the fourteen-year military-backed dictatorship in the Philippines

Poetry

Still, I am begging to be forgiven for the love / of my life

Pieces on the art and politics of translation

Essays

Creating a life in the shadow of the martial law years

Essays

The “New Society” had its own tricks. Billions disappeared from the nation’s coffers, clowns filled legislative positions.

Essays

The United States would support the Marcos dictatorship disguised as a “constitutional coup d’etat”

Fiction

Kay hirap maging mahirap, kung hindi ka pa manginig sa galit ay hindi ka pa iintindihin.
| It’s so hard to be poor. If you don’t tremble with rage, they won’t try to understand you.

Essays

It was Imelda as much as Ferdinand who brought about the country’s ruination

Poetry

How does it feel to watch / the seeds of your destruction / walk away from you?

Essays

The Marcoses have always been the masters of myth-making

Essays

We walked uphill where tall cogon grasses were already starting to don their silver shade.

Rebolusyonaryong panulaan noong panahon ng batas militar |
Revolutionary poetry during the martial law years

Poetry

“@nature, i avoid you,” “my life newly painted is well,” and “@nature, teach me things”

Fiction

I wondered if Pia was right, then, if I was seeking something too dangerous to be handled, a bomb that would kill me someday.

Essays

I became a full-time community organizer in 1971. The Marcos government declared martial law in September 1972. A month later, the Marcos military came and arrested me.

Essays

The minute I arrived at the University of the Philippines as a freshman, I joined the marches.

Essays

Marcos knew that power rested not just on fear and terror, but also censorship and propaganda.

Essays

A brief history lesson on the fourteen-year military-backed dictatorship in the Philippines

Essays

On the urgency of remembering the fourteen years of Ferdinand E. Marcos, Sr.’s military-backed dictatorship in the Philippines

Poetry

Still, I am begging to be forgiven for the love / of my life

Fifteen pieces on the places that have held us

Pieces on the art and politics of translation