Articles tagged language
17 Results

Magic / Dawn: Two Poems by Sahar Romani

By Sahar Romani | February 21, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘First memory of English: my father orders spaghetti from a waitress. / Foreign flowers blossom in his mouth and I’m spellbound in Urdu. // On Friday afternoons, cars spill across a bleached suburb. / Not far from the mosque, look! Crooked lines of devout Urdu.’

Uncertified

By Mehrnoosh Torbatnejad | February 14, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘did I ever tell the teacher / we invented a new language that a pair of six year olds spoke fluent / appeasement she pointed to the globe told me to tell him / this is the world and that is America’

Orphan: The Plural Form by Sun Yung Shin

By Sun Yung Shin | October 18, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘A family as triangle. Drifting lines. This [mother- father-child] triangle will never be reassembled.’

Why I Write in English

By Yang Huang | August 22, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘Wanting privacy in a police state was sheer stupidity’—to tell the stories of her family in China without the threat of censorship, Yang Huang had to look beyond Mandarin.

But Who Is Listening Now?

By Nancy Jooyoun Kim | August 3, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

What the painful process of learning Korean, the language spoken by those who love me, has taught me about facing rejection as a writer

Poetry From the Schoolyard: A-Z American Born Chinese

By Sophia Huynh | July 19, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘I remember when I first learned my ABCs. A is for apple, B is for bird, and C is for cat, but further experience taught me, that ABC means American Born Chinese.’

Letting the Dogs Out: Two Poems by Carlina Duan

By Carlina Duan | July 5, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘there was / my mother packaging miàn tiáo by the sink. / breath in the morning. breath in the afternoon. / the way history comes back to haunt me with / a plump fist. the way my mouth, a cave, opened / and closed.’

A Tongue I Can Use: Two Poems by Hayun Cho

By Hayun Cho | June 28, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘You hold the knife, you drink the sorrows. / You burn your hands making tea. / When something hurts, / You no longer feel rage. / You wipe up the mess. / Outside, dusk is the color of Violet and ash.’

Blank, White Spaces: An Interview with Esmé Weijun Wang

By Larissa Pham | May 9, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Writer and mental health advocate Esmé Weijun Wang talks about languages, love, immigrant children, and her debut novel, The Border of Paradise

Indonesia on the Global Literary Stage

By Margaret Scott and Jyothi Natarajan | August 27, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

What does it mean to be a guest of honor at the Frankfurt Book Fair? John McGlynn talks about the Lontar Foundation’s role in bringing Indonesian literature to the world and his own path from puppet maker to translator.

The Dirt in My Knees: Two Poems by Wendy Xu

By Wendy Xu | August 25, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘The world has a sleek, hot belly / A cue of white space, an inch or several yawning before the drop, towards volta’

“Stet” and Other Poems

By Tamiko Beyer | January 13, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

My palms cannot hold back the shifting currents. / They can slap a rhythm, hoist / a banner, hold / your face tenderly between them

Illiteracy

By Feng Sun Chen | November 6, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The key to enjoying the jubilant, fleshy dread of Feng Sun Chen’s supercut poem is appreciating what one might call the bodily turn in poetry.

Minority Rules: 2050, According to Jeff Ng

By Jeff Ng | February 5, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

In three decades, the United States will have a “majority-minority” population. We asked four artists to consider this demographic shift. Sharing his vision of 2050 is Jeff Ng, a designer better known as jeffstaple and the founder of Staple Design.

Minority Rules: 2050, According to An Xiao Mina

By An Xiao Mina | January 23, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

In three decades, the United States will have a “majority-minority” population. We asked four artists to consider this demographic shift. First up is An Xiao Mina, a designer and artist who focuses on the role of technology in building communities.

Speaker in a Future Age: Ed Bok Lee on Poetry, Places and the Death of Tongues

By Sueyeun Juliette Lee | November 28, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“I have a mole on the bottom of my foot, and some of my more superstitious relatives told me that if you have a mole on the sole of one foot, you’ll always yearn to visit new places more than most.”

Chasing Down the #Ghandifoul

By Siddhartha Mitter | July 11, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

A new Twitter feed goes after those who commit the common crime of misspelling Mahatma Gandhi’s last name.

Show Buttons
Hide Buttons