Articles tagged poetry
91 Results

Two Poems by Sawako Nakayasu

By Sawako Nakayasu | November 16, 2018 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Taking advantage of opacity, Girl E goes for it and punches indiscriminately.

“L’Heure Vert”

By Monica Ferrell | November 13, 2018 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Near the bottom of your hollow mouth, / Your cut tongue gathers lizard scales / Like a sunken bucket in an algal well.

Playing with white dust from Mongolia, always unfinished

By Tse Hao Guang (謝皓光) | November 5, 2018 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

into such sen / sitivity of it / such sense / could not say

The Age of Plastic

By Craig Santos Perez | November 1, 2018 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Ultrasound waves / pulse between fluid, tissue, and bone一 / the embryo echoes.

Photograph Curling

By Aldrin Valdez | October 30, 2018 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

She’s here to see us off. / Her voice is the softest ligature, unthreading. / Why are you saying goodbye to everyone except for me who raised you?

Water

By Divya Victor | October 25, 2018 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

After a sperm whale sucks in a squid, it will vomit out its beak.

Apple: Two Poems by Ayesha Raees

By Ayesha Raees | October 23, 2018 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

There was a longing / in the carvings of the / knife my mother held / against the fruit. She / peels with quiet / permission.

Wild Girls Seek Justice Through Writing Poetry: A Conversation with Marilyn Chin

By Jane Wong | October 17, 2018 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Marilyn Chin talks bad girl haikus, pissing off your ancestors, and her new career-spanning collection, A Portrait of the Self as Nation.

The Radical Metaphor of If They Come For Us

By Yasmin Adele Majeed | October 15, 2018 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Fatimah Asghar’s insistence on joy is a refusal of the demand that marginalized writers flatten trauma for the white gaze

Generation

By Ahmed Bouanani, translated by Emma Ramadan | October 12, 2018 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

May our dead no longer speak to us / Our language now kneaded into other woes / with rancid stars a meager pittance / and false kingdoms rich in violent blows

Object Permanence: Two Poems by Constance Chan

By Constance Chan | October 9, 2018 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

I always thought I’d find you / throned in the moon-drenched water my wonder / woman your palms curled upward like lotus skins

Chinatown Diptych: Two Poems by Jenny Xie

By Jenny Xie | October 2, 2018 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Who’s keeping count of what’s given against what’s stolen? / There’s nothing I can’t trace back to my coarse immigrant blood.

How I Wait for You to Return from Your Naturalization Ceremony

By Maddie Kim | September 25, 2018 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Tonight, when you return, you / will be an American and I will still be a girl who needs / a translator to read in my mother’s language, my mouth full / of so few shapes. I fall into the habits of my mother, it’s true.

Immigrant’s Lament

By Phuong T. Vuong | September 18, 2018 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

This is my small sphere. / I’ll make good, stay folded in myself. I promise / to memorize the bramble and texture of garden walls.

A Cruelty Special to Our Species

By Emily Jungmin Yoon | September 18, 2018 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

She is girl. She is gravel. She is grabbed. She is grabbed like handfuls of gravel.

Cherrystone, For Us

By Andrea Juele | September 11, 2018 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Fingers caked with wet / rice break backs and bellies, / pluck gills, / scrape eggs, tear limbs / Tita takes our legs– / cracks them / under a glass jar for us. / We suck shells ’til twilight.

When the Moon is Your Mother’s Lost Comb: Two Poems by Asa Drake

By Asa Drake | September 4, 2018 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Woman who puts up her hair comb holds / up the sky. There is the legend and probably a lie.

Our Wholeness, Our Togetherness: A Conversation with Aimee Nezhukumatathil & Ross Gay

By Aimee Nezhukumatathil and Ross Gay | August 29, 2018 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The poets talk creative collaboration, gardening, epistolary poetry, and the intimacy of sentences.

To Whom I Could Give This Pain: Three Poems by Lee Seong-Bok

By Lee Seong-Bok | August 28, 2018 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

From a crevice in a severed rock / birds with long beaks were tearing out earthworms. / My pain was without a wound / and in the bodies of the frayed, torn-out worms / there was no pain.

Still, Somehow: Two Poems by Hieu Minh Nguyen

By Hieu Minh Nguyen | August 21, 2018 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

because I love you, I will gut this distance / with nostalgia, because grief can taste of sugar if you run / your tongue along the right edge

Rainbow

By Eileen Chong | August 7, 2018 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Not all rainbow: here, tender orange, / there, rusted brown, the underside / gelatinous and white. Then the bones.

Disorder: Two Poems by Adeeba Talukder

By Adeeba Talukder | July 31, 2018 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

There is uncertainty in your future, a woman on the street told me. I can see it. You will be very unhappy, very soon.

Minoru

By Michael Prior | July 24, 2018 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The stallion: one win short / of the triple crown. My intonation: / one stress too many for an apology— / all the times I got it wrong. Minoru, / Minoru—both are gone.

narrowed lust

By Inam Kang | July 17, 2018 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

i say i’ll be / dressless, skinless, curated / and pickled. i say i’ll give it / all up for a chance to be warm.

Sugar on the Gash

By Divya Victor | July 12, 2018 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

We are our skins; we are our hides. But my skin, and the skin of others like me, has been torn. It is at the site of this gash that our identity coheres, that our identity is espied.

You Will Always Be Someone From Somewhere Else

By Dao Strom | July 10, 2018 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Mythologies have their way of explaining the basic human condition: that there will always be some where or thing you wish to get to or back to.

Wounded Elders: On Racial Identity and Reviewing

By Paisley Rekdal | July 5, 2018 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

What a review of Ocean Vuong’s Night Sky with Exit Wounds tells us about critics’ narrow perceptions of immigrant and war-affected identities

Swallow

By Geramee Hensley | June 26, 2018 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Ask if he knows, what the first champagne mango of the summer / tastes like, its golden juices flowing over some farmer’s / cigar paper skin.

Apo

By Cornell Pineda | June 19, 2018 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

A policeman found the boy minutes later. A shaman, / a monk, a priest, and a poet are still pouring over / his soul.

Wild Geese Sorrow: The Chinese Wall Inscriptions at Angel Island

By Jeffrey Thomas Leong and David Wojahn | June 12, 2018 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Against the hills, a tall building with plank-walled rooms. / I, wishing for my wife and son like clouds far away, / My night is even longer under the bright moon.

Marianna’s Beauty Salon: Two Poems by Bushra Rehman

By Bushra Rehman | June 5, 2018 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The moon appears / the small clip of a nail a paring knife / a chalk mark / left to linger in the sky

My Mother Tells Me About Lolo

By Marianne Chan | May 29, 2018 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

We prayed for resurrections, / but the dead remain as memories that / seemed to shrink in the mind, / like an airplane appearing smaller / the further it gets from the ground.

A Beautiful Child

By Omar Sakr | May 22, 2018 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

I should say kholo, my mother’s brother. / I should say umja, my father’s brother / so you know which branch of the tree to cut. Or / cherish.

Litany for the Long Moment

By Mary-Kim Arnold | May 15, 2018 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

If I can learn its grammar and alphabet / hold its vocabulary in my mouth / then perhaps I can know something of history—my history.

Face | Off

By Su Hwang | May 8, 2018 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Pipedream: / I wondered what it would be like to strip away / slit eyes—sick of assimilation; the debilitating / task of tireless reinvention.

A Woman May Not Be a Safe Place: Two Poems by Diana Khoi Nguyen

By Diana Khoi Nguyen | April 30, 2018 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

When I was born, my parents put me on a rug on the ground and stood / staring at me until the light outside dimmed and then there in the / darkening we three were quiet for a while

Sadakichi Hartmann, a “Missing Link” of American Poetry

By Floyd Cheung | April 30, 2018 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

How the Japanese American poet, art critic, and performer helped shape Modernist poetry as he brought Japanese poetic forms into English

The New Song of Myself: An Interview with Jennifer Crandall

By Liz Hildreth and Jennifer Crandall | April 24, 2018 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Journalist Jennifer Crandall is re-claiming Walt Whitman’s “Song of Myself” through the voices and stories of the South.

Elegy Ending in the Sound of a Sewing Machine: Two Poems by Cindy Tran

By Cindy Tran | April 24, 2018 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

I could live like this, I thought, lie here / and have my own kind of drifting blue.

Ten Enduring Statements from Lost or Forgotten Films

By John Yau | April 17, 2018 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

We wonder if this is what heaven is like—an old movie theater with thick velvet curtains that part, as the lights dim and the naked cherubs peering down from the blue and gold ceiling vanish, like comets.

Driving Lessons

By Michelle Tong | April 10, 2018 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

I want to make / change and am ready / for new challenge. / I can stay between white white lines.

I Just Want to Write: An Interview with Wawa

By Tammy Lai-Ming Ho | April 10, 2018 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The Hong Kong poet talks the Umbrella movement, being an outsider and an insider in Hong Kong, and how she translates the world.

Ars Poetica in a Dream Language

By Anni Liu | April 3, 2018 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

I dream my mother / unravels / hair out of my mouth / in English / she asks me / to speak Chinese / coils the hair / into a dark gloss / whorled / in her palm

recollect

By Lawrence Ypil | March 27, 2018 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

How do I tell you that I have done this before? / How to build a diorama of what I am not.

Moments

By Ayesha Raees | March 20, 2018 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The floor broke apart / the tasbeeh into ninety / nine beady reflections / and my mother is still / able to fake a surprise / when she can’t locate / them all.

in the end we are humanlike (Blade Runner 2049)

By Nina Powles | March 9, 2018 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

I am the last of them—a woman with her own dreams, not salvaged from the cloud-based data lake that I created.

Three Tongue Twisters: Poems by Duy Doan

By Duy Doan | March 6, 2018 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

One lover was bold and touched / me once behind a door, but it was her cousin / Vandie, the one who never looked at me, that I loved. // One lover was kind, so kind, in kissing / me at all.

40 Years: Poems by Rami Karim

By Rami Karim | February 27, 2018 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Older immigrants talk as if Reagan invited them to dinner. / The dream never showed, but we can paint chain link white.

All About the Birds

By Li-Young Lee | February 20, 2018 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

They might spend most of their days in the sky, / but every evening they remember / to come back to earth.

Dreams and Divination

By Xiao Yue Shan | February 13, 2018 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

I lay my head down on a pillow pilled / with characters, yellow tracks and traces / of the name I was given.

Filipino time

By Janelle Marie Salanga | January 23, 2018 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

but really every word sounds like the sun/ sweltering in the middle of Santacruzan

I Wore My Blackest Hair: Two Poems by Carlina Duan

By Carlina Duan | January 9, 2018 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

I was her American / daughter, my tongue / my hardest muscle / forced to swallow / a muddy alphabet.

Body, Reconfigurations, glass

By Teng Qian Xi | January 2, 2018 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The world held us / In glass circles

Writing the Families We Want: An Interview with Chen Chen

By Yanyi | December 19, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Poet Chen Chen talks finding your family, queer Asian American poetry, and Journey to the West.

A History-to-Come of Helmbrellas: Their Features and Fates

By Norman Erikson Pasaribu | December 13, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Think about it: if rain accumulating above someone / resumes descent, where does it fall?

This is Not a Poem About My Mother

By Sreshtha Sen | December 12, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

I tell C no one loves me like a mother would. / C says no one loves a fragile queer. I choke / on the thread as it slices words out:/ Say Ma say Mother America say Mother India say love me like a mother won’t.

JFK Airport

By Celina Su | September 26, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘As if I could get un-situated / this airport a bubble hovering / in a void between celestial bodies / in but not of / the country I stand in.’

AAWWTV: Poetry Poetry V

By AAWW | September 7, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Kimiko Hahn, Monica Youn, Sally Wen Mao and Emily Yoon joined us for a night of poetry.

accent

By ko ko thett | September 5, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

People judge me by my skin. My skin’s purpose in life is to prove them wrong.

Keeping Tabs: A Critical Eye

By AAWW | August 29, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

This week’s articles are about the current U.S. political climate–but don’t worry, we have some new tunes for you to enjoy, too!

Ghosts in the War Machine: Jane Wong’s Overpour

By Sally Wen Mao | June 6, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The poet talks about her debut collection, sharing silenced histories in her writing, and being a “wild girl poet.”

Silence and Breath: Kaveh Akbar and Kazim Ali

By Kaveh Akbar and Kazim Ali | June 2, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The two poets talk about their literary family trees, poetry as a protective force, and the changing landscape for Muslim American writers.

宇多田 ヒカル and the Huntsman: Poems by Kazumi Chin

By Kazumi Chin | May 23, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘This drought of silence / that does not feed me. I mean, I refuse / to hold his vanity. And demand to know / myself better. Cull his soul but only / for memory, carve a history / for myself in which my reflection / alone can be seen.’

Salome Dances the Seven Veils, Asks for the Head of a Baptist in Return

By Nina Li Coomes | April 18, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘No words of a Savior are news to a Woman. / No words of a resurrection sound gospel[-enough] / when you are both the Crucifixion and the Crowd.’

The Dirt Will Wash Us Clean: Poems by Hari Alluri

By Hari Alluri | April 4, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘We do not want to hover like a line of fog, a river’s shadow, but slower: shadows in conversation, gentle only when we don’t bother expecting to be heard.’

Keeping Tabs: An American Story

By Yasmin Majeed | February 3, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Muslim Ban CliffsNotes, honoring the late, great Bharati Mukherjee, why Fred Korematsu’s story still matters today, and more.

“Nautical Shrouds”

By Vi Khi Nao | January 24, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘I roam. Sometimes in solitude; sometimes in a crowd. But unlike a dog, I do not die a little each day, subdued to the loyalty of my master. I die all at once if it must be.’

The Pentagram Discovery by W. Todd Kaneko

By W. Todd Kaneko | January 3, 2017 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

‘If you spark a flame and turn / it upside down, / you will find it is still / a flame.’

Moment of Explosion: On Solmaz Sharif’s ‘Look’

By Yasmin Majeed | November 30, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Dissecting the violence of state, warfare, and language

AAWW TV: Microagressions (& Other Poems)

By AAWW | November 17, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Poets Claudia Rankine and Hoa Nguyen speak with Rigoberto Gonzalez about the urgent need for poetry as a force for political change.

Mg Roberts: “Displacement Is a Moment of Translation”

By Maw Shein Win | September 26, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

An interview with Bay Area poet, teacher, and artist Mg Roberts on interpreting graffiti, fragmented immigrant narratives, and how everyday is an opportunity to revise

AAWW TV: Remixing Guantanamo Bay

By AAWW | March 23, 2016 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Poet Philip Metres talks about why he chose to create an opera from a redacted history of torture

After Yi-Fen Chou: A Forum

By AAWW | September 15, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

19 writers respond to Michael Derrick Hudson’s yellowface

Your Closest Relative is a TV Set

By David Foote | July 8, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Writer-artist-professor Tan Lin talks fictive relatives, the narrative of an immigrant TV culture, and ‘becoming Chinese’ in America

Authenticity Obsession, or Conceptualism as Minstrel Show

By Ken Chen | June 11, 2015 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

What recent race scandals by avant-garde poets Kenneth Goldsmith and Vanessa Place have to do with sunglasses, the invention of the fingerprint, and the atom bomb.

Writing Into Silence

By Bushra Rehman | October 16, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Cathy Linh Che talks about her debut collection of poems, Split, and what it means to mimic flashbacks of war, immigration, and sexual violence.

Body Plus Poem

By Yasmin Majeed | August 12, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

An interview with spoken word duo DarkMatter on radical desis, the legacy of Partition, Twitter poems and The Perks of Being a Wallflower

Apiology, with Stigma and Other Poems

By Sally Wen Mao | June 13, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

I don’t teach my girls / to brave the violence of sun, sons, or stings. / When resources run out, don’t sit there and behave. / Abandon hive.

A Cupcake Is Identity As Much As Syntax Is Identity

By Abeer Hoque | May 28, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

A review of Tarfia Faizullah’s debut poetry collection Seam, and an interview with the poet

Refusal=Intervention

By Eunsong K. & Don Mee Choi | March 7, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“Asian American Poetry” is not a manageable category—it is not a list.

“Stet” and Other Poems

By Tamiko Beyer | January 13, 2014 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

My palms cannot hold back the shifting currents. / They can slap a rhythm, hoist / a banner, hold / your face tenderly between them

“I’m Really Sorry for That Horrible Line Break”

By Henry W. Leung | December 6, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

An interview with poet Tung-Hui Hu

9/11/11

By April Naoko Heck | November 20, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

I hate you, poem, for wanting to know the truth. / The truth is, I trusted the sky. / Trusted it wouldn’t throw things at us

Two Poems by R.A. Villanueva

By R.A. Villanueva | November 20, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The rivers / and trenches glossed with light / know we are so relentless as to plan / for catastrophe

Illiteracy

By Feng Sun Chen | November 6, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The key to enjoying the jubilant, fleshy dread of Feng Sun Chen’s supercut poem is appreciating what one might call the bodily turn in poetry.

Songs of Revolt

By Ali Mir, Bushra Rehman, Purvi Shah, and Syed Mohammed Shahed | October 29, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Poetic responses to the literature of the Ghadar movement

Studio Visit | Page Turner Edition: Victoria Chang

By Victoria Chang | October 3, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

The author of The Boss thinks she might be the only person left on this planet without an iPod—but her poems are certianly full of music.

Studio Visit: Meena Alexander

By Meena Alexander | August 23, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

This New York-based poet once dreamt of being a trapeze artist.

The Boss

By Victoria Chang | July 31, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Four Poems by Victoria Chang

Monday Clicks: Lunar New Year, Celine Dion and Other Forms of “Poetry”

By Anne Ishii | February 11, 2013 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

Link-bait for the Monday-challenged.

Speaker in a Future Age: Ed Bok Lee on Poetry, Places and the Death of Tongues

By Sueyeun Juliette Lee | November 28, 2012 | Asian American Writers' Workshop

“I have a mole on the bottom of my foot, and some of my more superstitious relatives told me that if you have a mole on the sole of one foot, you’ll always yearn to visit new places more than most.”

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